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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott). Search the whole document.

Found 364 total hits in 79 results.

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Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 45
Camp Taylor, Huntsville, Ala., May 15, 1862. Sir: For more than two weeks the enemy has been landing troops at several points below the mouth of Elk River, principally cavalry. Their headquarters were at Rogersville, near Lamb's Ferry, and at Bainbridge Ferry, below the mouth of Shoal Creek. From these points Morgan's, Helm's, Scott's, and the Texan Cavalry have started upon their marauding expeditions. On the very day I received command of the troops posted between this point and Nashville I ordered an expedition against Rogersville, to be commanded by General Negley, which was to rendezvous at Pulaski. Colonel Lytle, of the Seventeenth Brigade, was placed in command of a force to move from Athens and engage the attention of the enemy at the mouth of Elk River. The expedition has proved a success. General Negley, with the troops under his command, moved with the utmost celerity, and has won my thanks and admiration by the rapidity of his movements. Colonel Lytle's force
Tennessee River (United States) (search for this): chapter 45
9-30. Headquarters Brigade, Sweeden's Cove, East Tenn., May 30, 1862. General: Having received information from couriers sent by myself that Generals Smith and Evans were moving on Huntsville (and with your permission), I crossed the Tennessee River, with my command, at Lamb's Ferry, on the 9th instant. Obtaining reliable information that there were large wagon trains on the Pulaski and Elkton turnpike, I marched, on the evening of May 11th, with 850 men, toward Pulaski, but findingnth. If there is any truth in this report it explains General Mitchel's late movement. In compliance with General Beauregard's orders, which I received at Chattanooga, I moved my force over the mountain yesterday, intending to cross the Tennessee River to-day below Chattanooga, in the vicinity of Jasper. Colonel Wharton preceded me and has already crossed. After crossing the mountain I met a courier about 12 miles from Jasper, with a letter from General Leadbetter, inclosing a copy of
Rogersville, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 45
iver, and formed a junction with General Negley on the morning of the 14th, returning to Huntsville on the evening of the 15th. On the 18th 300 men from the Ninth Brigade, under command of Colonel Lytle, marched for Winchester, and arrived there on the morn ing of the 24th. After a skirmish, dispersed a body of rebel cavalry, and occupied the town, and returned to Huntsville May 24. No. 2.-report of Brig. Gen. James S. Negley, . S. Army. headquarters United States forces, Rogersville, Ala., May 14, 1862. General: I have the honor to report the result of an expedition to this point. The command-consisting of the Seventy-ninth and a detachment of the Seventy-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, Lieutenant Sypher's section of artillery, from Standart's battery; Major Owsley's battalion of Kentucky, and Captain Jennings' battalion, of the Seventh Pennsylvania Cavalry, forming the advance brigade, commanded by Col. H. A. Hambright, acting as brigadier-general, and the First Wi
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 45
ume the responsibility of the entire command, but wished merely to co-operate. To settle this matter, I proceeded to Chattanooga, and thence telegraphed you and the War Department relative to my rank and command, and also to you for orders relativanifested a desire to withdraw his regiment from the brigade, to which I acceded. While absent from my command, at Chattanooga, a superior force of the enemy, composed of cavalry, infantry, and artillery, made a forced march from Huntsville, andt it explains General Mitchel's late movement. In compliance with General Beauregard's orders, which I received at Chattanooga, I moved my force over the mountain yesterday, intending to cross the Tennessee River to-day below Chattanooga, in theChattanooga, in the vicinity of Jasper. Colonel Wharton preceded me and has already crossed. After crossing the mountain I met a courier about 12 miles from Jasper, with a letter from General Leadbetter, inclosing a copy of General Beauregard's permission to rema
Pulaski, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 45
p. m. on the 13th instant General Negley's expedition from Pulaski, supported by Colonel Lytle's expedition from Athens, entebe commanded by General Negley, which was to rendezvous at Pulaski. Colonel Lytle, of the Seventeenth Brigade, was placed intwo columnsone body, under command of General Negley, from Pulaski; the other, under command of Colonel Lytle, from Athens. , of the First Wisconsin, acting as brigadier-general-left Pulaski yesterday at 3 p. m., via the Lamb's Ferry road; encamped a few hours 12 miles from Pulaski; made a forced march of 21 miles in six hours; drove in the enemy's pickets, who gave the a0 men, toward Pulaski, but finding there were 2,500 men in Pulaski, I returned in the direction of my camps. At the forkschel was concentrating his forces on the line of road from Pulaski to Athens, Elkton, and Huntsville, and contemplated the speedy completion of the railroad from Pulaski to connect with the Memphis and Charleston Railroad, at the same time holding th
Salem (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 45
200 or 300) took refuge in the court-house, a brick building, and from this sheltered position kept up a warm fire on the reconnoitering party, killing 2 and wounding 6. The loss of the enemy was the prisoners before mentioned and 9 or 10 killed. The reconnoitering party would have carried the court-house by assault had they not feared the enemy would commence shelling the town with their artillery. The following morning (May 23) the enemy hastily evacuated the place, retreating toward Salem. I have since been reliably informed that General Mitchel has moved from Huntsville toward Shelbyville, with a force of about 1,000 infantry, 300 cavalry, and a large wagon train, the latter loaded in part with baggage. It is supposed this movement indicates the evacuation of Huntsville. Reports from Huntsville, brought by citizens and also obtained from prisoners, agree that the Federals say they have been whipped at Corinth. If there is any truth in this report it explains Genera
Sweeden's Cove (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 45
deserve especial notice, a large portion of their troops having marched 75 miles in less than three days time. While we failed to chastise the enemy, as was expected, we have added another instance of disgraceful flight. With every consideration of respect, I am, yours very truly, Jass. S. Negley, Brigadier-General, Commanding. General O. M. Mitchel. No. 3.-report of Col. John Adams C. S. Army, including the operations of his brigade, May 9-30. Headquarters Brigade, Sweeden's Cove, East Tenn., May 30, 1862. General: Having received information from couriers sent by myself that Generals Smith and Evans were moving on Huntsville (and with your permission), I crossed the Tennessee River, with my command, at Lamb's Ferry, on the 9th instant. Obtaining reliable information that there were large wagon trains on the Pulaski and Elkton turnpike, I marched, on the evening of May 11th, with 850 men, toward Pulaski, but finding there were 2,500 men in Pulaski, I retur
Bellefonte Station (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 45
ent from this brigade proceeded to Elk River, under command of Colonel Lytle, on the 12th, and returned on the 14th. The Ninth Brigade has been encamped at Huntsville, Ala., since date of last monthly return. The different regiments have been constantly in motion on the line of the Memphis and Charleston Railroad. The Second Ohio is now in camp at Huntsville; Twenty-first Ohio is now in camp at Athens; Thirty-third Ohio.is now in camp at Bellefonte; Tenth Wisconsin is now in camp at Bellefonte Station. The Seventeenth Brigade left Bridgeport May 1, and returned to Huntsville, from which place, on the 12th, it proceeded, with the Third and Tenth Ohio and Fifteenth Kentucky Volunteers, and detachments from the Eighth Brigade, to EJk River, and formed a junction with General Negley on the morning of the 14th, returning to Huntsville on the evening of the 15th. On the 18th 300 men from the Ninth Brigade, under command of Colonel Lytle, marched for Winchester, and arrived there on
Camp Taylor (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 45
Adams, C. S. Army, including operations of his brigade May 9-30. No. 1.-reports of Maj. Gen. Ormsby M. Mitchel, U. S. Army. headquarters Third Division, Camp Taylor, Huntsville, Ala., May 15, 1862. At 6 p. m. on the 13th instant General Negley's expedition from Pulaski, supported by Colonel Lytle's expedition from Athensastern side of this region under my command. O. M. Mitchel, Major-General, Commanding. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War. headquarters Third Division, Camp Taylor, Huntsville, Ala., May 15, 1862. Sir: For more than two weeks the enemy has been landing troops at several points below the mouth of Elk River, principally cfully, your obedient servant, O. M. Mitchel Major-General, Commanding. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War, Washington. headquarters Third Division, Camp Taylor, Huntsville, Ala., May 15, 1862. After long and continuous efforts to obtain reliable information of the forces of the enemy which had crossed the river at t
Bellefonte (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 45
etteville, Tenn., arriving on the 28th. A detachment from this brigade proceeded to Elk River, under command of Colonel Lytle, on the 12th, and returned on the 14th. The Ninth Brigade has been encamped at Huntsville, Ala., since date of last monthly return. The different regiments have been constantly in motion on the line of the Memphis and Charleston Railroad. The Second Ohio is now in camp at Huntsville; Twenty-first Ohio is now in camp at Athens; Thirty-third Ohio.is now in camp at Bellefonte; Tenth Wisconsin is now in camp at Bellefonte Station. The Seventeenth Brigade left Bridgeport May 1, and returned to Huntsville, from which place, on the 12th, it proceeded, with the Third and Tenth Ohio and Fifteenth Kentucky Volunteers, and detachments from the Eighth Brigade, to EJk River, and formed a junction with General Negley on the morning of the 14th, returning to Huntsville on the evening of the 15th. On the 18th 300 men from the Ninth Brigade, under command of Colonel Ly
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