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Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
he city of Augusta, I partly walked and partly rode to the town of Atlanta. I found the slaves in Georgia passively discontented. They did and without an aspiration. A sad, very sad condition of mind! Atlanta is a straggling business place, of about nine thousand inhabitants. I was there, I think, on New Year's Day, 1855. Atlanta has no beauty that we should desire it as a residence. It feebly supports two litanut Seller's Triumph. I heard a good story of Young America at Atlanta. It shows what manner of individual that young gentleman is. I beknives and pistols in the southern part of Georgia. One day, at Atlanta, a peanut and candy-selling urchin, at the railroad station, was r twenty-five cents and bought a piece of fat pork. The grade at Atlanta is very steep; and heavy freight trains, when going at full speed,me a godly city, Alabama. I walked the entire distance from Atlanta, Georgia to Montgomery, Alabama. As I intend to revisit that coun
Hanover Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
as the right to compel the owners of slaves, under a penalty, within a reasonable time, to remove the future increase out of the country. His speech is devoted to the discussion of this proposition, and in it he takes the most ultra positions. The Virginia slaveholder out-Garrisons Garrison. He even introduces the golden rule as an argument! In the opening paragraph, he says: It will be recollected, sir, that when the memorial from Charles City, was presented by the gentleman from Hanover, and when its reference was opposed, I took occasion to observe that I believed the people of Norfolk county would rejoice, could they even in the vista of time, see some scheme for the gradual removal of this curse from our land. I would have voted, sir, for its rejection, because I was desirous to see a report from the committee declaring the slave population an evil, and recommending to the people of this commonwealth the adoption of some plan for its riddance. The words italicized a
Jamaica, L. I. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ion of the South. I am sorry to say that the Irish population, with very few exceptions, are the devoted supporters of Southern slavery. They have acquired the reputation, both among the Southerners and Africans, of being the most merciless of negro task-masters. Englishmen, Scotchmen and Germans, with very few exceptions, are either secret abolitionists or silent neutrals. An Englishman is treated with far more and sincerer respect by the slaves than any American. They have heard of Jamaica; they have sighed for Canada. I have seen the eyes of the bondmen in the Carolinas sparkle as they talked of the probabilities of a war with the old British. A war with England Now, would, in all probability, extinguish Southern slavery forever. A Southern requiem. It is sad to hear a slaveholder, of the less educated class, speak in eulogy of a negro who has gone to the world where the weary are at rest. It is sickening to think, as he recounts their virtues, that he never could ha
Charles City (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
public uses, but this: Whether the Legislature has the right to compel the owners of slaves, under a penalty, within a reasonable time, to remove the future increase out of the country. His speech is devoted to the discussion of this proposition, and in it he takes the most ultra positions. The Virginia slaveholder out-Garrisons Garrison. He even introduces the golden rule as an argument! In the opening paragraph, he says: It will be recollected, sir, that when the memorial from Charles City, was presented by the gentleman from Hanover, and when its reference was opposed, I took occasion to observe that I believed the people of Norfolk county would rejoice, could they even in the vista of time, see some scheme for the gradual removal of this curse from our land. I would have voted, sir, for its rejection, because I was desirous to see a report from the committee declaring the slave population an evil, and recommending to the people of this commonwealth the adoption of some p
Augusta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
s to Columbus, or ten days from Wilmington to Augusta, I cannot now recall. I walked from Columbusman Yev got the Yellar fever! first view of Augusta the appearance of the city the negro of thel remember my first entrance into the city of Augusta. The yellow fever was raging there, as? wely was out of town! The nearer I approached Augusta, the more frequently was I asked, as I stoppewell. Where y‘ goina to? he snapped. Augusta. Must be a d — d fool, he jerked out, loo, came kindly forward and gave me a glass. Augusta. Opposite Augusta, on the other side of thAugusta, on the other side of the Savannah River, is the town of Hamburg, in South Carolina. Although the pestilence had raged in Augusta with terrible fatality for more than a month, no case of yellow fever had as yet occurred iin mourning. Perhaps the utter desolation of Augusta may best be inferred from the fact, that thisievish habits. In walking in the vicinity of Augusta one day, I came up to a negro, who was carryi[11 more...]<
Southampton (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 5
speedily republished. It consists of a number of pamphlet speeches, bound together; most of them, as the title-page tells us, published by request. It is a genuine Virginia volume, as the names of the authors, printers, publishers, and the amazingly clumsy appearance of it, prove. These speeches were delivered in the House of Delegates of Virginia, in 1832, by the leading politicians of the State, shortly after the celebrated insurrection, or massacre (as the slaveholders style it) of Southampton — a period of intense excitement, when abolition was the order of the day, even in the stony-hearted Old Dominion. Is slavery a curse? Listen to the answer of Thomas Marshall, of Fauquier, then, as yet, one of the distinguished politicians of Virginia: Thomas Marshall's opinion. Slavery is ruinous to the whites; it retards improvement; roots out our industrious population; banishes the yeomanry of the country; deprives the spinner, the weaver, the smith, the shoemaker, the ca
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ished to find that there are advocates here for slavery with all its effects. Sir, this only proves how far — how very far-we may be carried by pecuniary interest; it proves what has been said by an immortal bard: That man is unco‘ weak, And little to be trusted; If self the wavering balance shake, 'Tis rarely right adjusted. Sir, I believe that no cancer on the physical body was ever more certain, steady, and fatal in its progress, than is this cancer on the political body of the State of Virginia. It is eating into her very vitals. Danger Ahead. And again: Like a mighty avalanche, the evil is rolling to-wards us, accumulating weight and impetus at every turn. And, sir, if we do nothing to avert its progress, it will ultimately overwhelm and destroy us forever. And again: Sir, although I have no fears for any general results from the efforts of this class of our population now, still, sir, the time will come when there will be imminent general danger. Pass a
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 5
numbers of them — who would return, if he could, to his old home and condition in the South. Treatment of Free negroes. I bliev dat, said the slave, I know if I could get away, I would n't come back. Mass'r, he added, I's heerd dat in England, a colored man is treated jest as well as dey do white folks. Is dat true, mass'r? I believe so, I replied. Is colored people treated as well as white folks at de North? Why, no, I was forced to reply, not quite. There is a little pret, etc. The negroes brought very high prices. It is interesting to observe how the enlargement of commercial relations makes the interest of one nation the interest of every one with which it has extended intercourse. The Eastern war, which England was waging at the time, was the immediate cause of these inhuman auctions. Cotton was selling at so very reduced a figure, that many of the planters were compelled to dispose of a portion of their human live stock, in order to provide subsisten
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
em to have been purposely and providentially designed to exhibit in their future histories, the difference which naturally results from a country free, and a country afflicted with the curse of slavery. The same may be said of the two States of Missouri and Illinois. Surely this is satisfactory testimony? Thomas J. Randolph spoke next, and in the same strain as the preceding speakers. Is slavery a curse? Marshall, Barry, Randolph, Faulkner, and Chandler answer in the affirmative; aurnished to the pro-slavery non-slaveholders who are invulnerable to all ideas of justice. Let the anti-slavery population of the South be associated by forming a secret society similar to the Odd Fellows, or the Masons, or the Blue Lodges of Missouri, and let this union be extended over the entire country. The societies could circulate tracts, assist slaves in escaping, and direct the movements of the agents of the Grand Lodge. Third. Begin at the borders. In every free border town and
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
t reverentially. In Georgia, Florida, and South Carolina, and even in some parts of Virginia and Noernal operation is frequently performed in South Carolina, still I cannot hear of it without a shuddook the branch to Columbus, the capital of South Carolina, I walked from there to Augusta--sixty milon both sides of the track until you enter South Carolina, when a pleasant change is visible. Ahere are thousands, both in this State and South Carolina, who believe in them as firmly as they beln and an evil? opinion of Gov. Wilson, of South Carolina forward! the Peanut Seller's Triumph, ive by a Personal Liberty Law! So, too, South Carolina. In 1830 she said: The government creaation of slaves! True!--very true! oh, South Carolina! Soon may the negroes utter and carry outankee renegade, for example, whom I met in South Carolina, and who told me that he had once been an majority, I believe, of the married men in South Carolina support colored mistresses also. A Fu[4 more...]
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