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Jamaica, L. I. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
tion, slavery will soon be drowned by the advancing and increasing tide of Northern emigration. Neither will the mere prevention of the extension of slavery kill it. Within its present limits, it may live a thousand years. There is land enough to support the present races, and their increase, for that length of time there. Unless we strike a blow for the slaves — as Lafayette and his Frenchmen did for the revolutionary sires — or unless they strike a blow for themselves, as the negroes of Jamaica and Hayti, to their immortal honor, did--American slavery has a long and devastating future before it, in which, by the stern necessities of its nature, Freedom or the Union must crouch and die beneath its potent sceptre of death and desolation. II. The field negroes, as a class, are coarse, filthy, brutal, and lascivious; liars, parasites, hypocrites, and thieves; without self-respect, religious aspirations, or the nobler traits which characterize humanity. They are almost as degraded
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 7
y hate slavery and the race that upholds it, and are longing for an opportunity to display that hatred. Not far from this territory, in a neighboring province of Mexico, live a nation of trained negro soldiers — the far-famed Florida Indians, who, after baffling and defying the United States, and after having been treacherously ea Indians has made them the eternal enemies of the South. The nation will see this fact when the Texan struggle begins. Slavery can never be extended into Northern Mexico. The people hate it. Through all the multitudinous mutations of their history, this hatred has been the only established principle which pervaded the entire the Eastern world is hostile to it always. Can it extend Southward? It will look in vain to Central America. The same mixed races who hate the modern Norman in Mexico inhabit those regions, and are animated by the same true spirit; and the attempt, if ever made, to subdue this people, in order to extend the area of bondage, wil
Bunker Hill (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
g to the influence of prominent Republican statesmen, whose unfortunately conservative character of counsel — which it was impossible openly to resist-effectually baffled all our hopes: hopes which Democratic action was auspiciously promoting. Are we, then, without hope? No! and, while slaves live, and the God of justice is omnipotent, never will we be discouraged. Revolutions never go backward. The second American Revolution has begun. Kansas was its Lexington: Texas will be its Bunker Hill, and South Carolina its Yorktown. It is fashionable for our animalcule-statesmen to lament or affirm that slavery cannot speedily be abolished. It is so wrought and interwoven with the social system of the South--with its commercial, political, and religious organizations — that to root it out at once, they maintain, would be disastrous to the country and to the slave himself. Perish the country, then, and woe to the slave! Whatever falls, let slavery perish. Whoever suffers, let s
Kansas (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
gion, who distinguished themselves as the champions of the South in Kansas. Morally, they are on a level with the whites' around them. The sution by the Hon. J. C. Vaughan, formerly of South Carolina, now of Kansas: once a Southern slaveholder, now one of the truest champions of frtary conflict of the sections. Hence I left the South, and went to Kansas; and endeavored, personally and by my pen, to precipitate a revolutions never go backward. The second American Revolution has begun. Kansas was its Lexington: Texas will be its Bunker Hill, and South Carolin truth that they who take the sword shall perish by it. South of Kansas lies a fertile region already darkened by the curse of slavery. Itcter of those States be? There are numbers of resolute pioneers in Kansas who have sworn that Texas shall again be free — as it was under Mex of the Dismal Swamp, the maroons of Florida, the free-state men of Kansas, have pointed out the method. The South committed suicide when it
Drummond Lake (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
er legs and hunder hands. Dey's more ‘commodatina dan any folks I's ever seed afore or since. Da lend me dar saws, so I might be ‘pared to split my shingles; and den dey turn right ‘bout and ‘commodate demsels. Ye ax me inscribe de swamp? Well: de great Dismal Swamp (dey call it Juniper Swamp) ‘stends from whar it begins in Norfolk, old Virginny, to de upper part ob Carolina. Dat's what I's told. It stands itself more ‘n fifty mile north and souf. I worked ‘bout four mile ‘bove Drummond Lake, which be ten mile wide. De boys used to make canoes out ob bark, and hab a nice time fishina in de lake. Best water in Juniper Swamp ever tasted by man. It is stated to have medicinal properties. Dreadful healthy place to live, up in de high land in de cane-brake. ‘Speck ye ‘ve heern tell on it? There is reefs ob land — folks call de high lands. In dar de cane-brake grow t'irty feet high. In dem ar can-brakes de ground is kivered wit leaves, kinder makina a natu
Cuba (Cuba) (search for this): chapter 7
regions, and are animated by the same true spirit; and the attempt, if ever made, to subdue this people, in order to extend the area of bondage, will justly precipitate a war with the powers of Europe. The South does not dare to hazard a war with such great powers on such an issue. The islands of the American Archipelago are to-day almost exclusively in the hands of the liberated African race. The first serious attempt at annexation will put them entirely in the possession of the blacks. Cuba has already, within her borders, seven thousand self-emancipated citizens; and it is a fact, well known in our State Department, that the Spanish rulers of that island would unhesitatingly arm the black population, both slave and free, in the event of any serious attempt at conquest. But I would not fear the extension of American slavery, even if the neighboring nations were more friendly to it. The South will soon find enough to do at home. Canada has hitherto been the safety valve of Sou
Suffolk, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
naway. So de colored folks got jist as much devil in dem as white folks; I sometimes tink de are jist as voracious arter money. Da ‘tray de fugitives to dar masters. Sometimes de masters comes and shoots dem down dead on de spot. . . . I saw wid my own eyes when dey shot Jacob. Dat is too bad to ‘member. God will not forget it; never, I bet ye. Six white men coined upon him afore lie knowed nothin‘ at all ‘bout it most. Jist de first ting Jacob seed was his old master, Simon Simms, of Suffolk, Virginny, standing right afore him. Dem ar men — all on em — had a gun apiece, an' dey every one of dem pointed right straight to de head of poor Jacob. He felt scared most to def. Old Simms hollered out to him--Jake! You run a step, you nigger, and I'll blow yer brains out. Jacob did n't know for de life on him what to do. He feared to gin up: he too scared to run; lie dunno what to do. Six guns wid number two shot, aimed at your head is n't nothina, I tell ye. Takes brave man to
Augusta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ob de plate dat da put de head ob John de Baptis' in, she war so mad at him, de legions tell us, dat she tuk a handful ob pins and stuck ‘em in de tongue ob de Apostle! Ah ---- The preacher, from whose discourse I selected this remarkable biblical information, was a great favorite with the white population, who (if I mistake not) addressed him as a Doctor of Divinity. When he died I read a paragraph from a Savannah paper, in which his virtues and learning were eulogized! IV. At Augusta, Georgia, I knew a boy of between sixteen and seventeen years of age, who supported a mulatto girl mistress. Her mother was a free woman, and the daughter was about his own age. He took up a peck of meal to their house, and some bacon, every Saturday night, and for this weekly allowance he was permitted, as frequently as he pleased, to cohabit with the girl. The pernicious effect of slavery on children I have frequently heard parents lament. And yet these same parents would favor the extensio
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
d such another is too old to learn to pick cotton, and such another will bring so much, when it has grown a little more, I have frequently heard people say, in the street, or the public houses. That a slave woman is commonly esteemed least for her laboring qualities, most for those qualities which give value to a brood-mare, is, also, constantly made apparent. A slaveholder writing to me with regard to my cautious statements on this subject, made in the Daily Times, says: In the States of Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, Kentucky, Tennessee and Missouri, as much attention is paid to the breeding and growth of negroes as to that of horses and mules. Further South, we raise them both for use and for market. Planters command their girls and women (married or unmarried) to have children; and I have known a great many negro girls to be sold off, because they did not have children. A breeding woman is worth from one-sixth to one-fourth more than one that does not breed. XIII. Th
Juniper Swamp (United States) (search for this): chapter 7
be ‘pared to split my shingles; and den dey turn right ‘bout and ‘commodate demsels. Ye ax me inscribe de swamp? Well: de great Dismal Swamp (dey call it Juniper Swamp) ‘stends from whar it begins in Norfolk, old Virginny, to de upper part ob Carolina. Dat's what I's told. It stands itself more ‘n fifty mile north and souf.‘bout four mile ‘bove Drummond Lake, which be ten mile wide. De boys used to make canoes out ob bark, and hab a nice time fishina in de lake. Best water in Juniper Swamp ever tasted by man. It is stated to have medicinal properties. Dreadful healthy place to live, up in de high land in de cane-brake. ‘Speck ye ‘ve heern tellparts. Whar I worked da called it Company Swamp. When we wanted fresh pork we goed to Gum Swamp, ‘bout sun-down, run a wild hog down from de cane-brakes into Juniper Swamp, whar dar feet can 't touch hard ground, knock dem over, and dat's de way we kill dem. De same way we ketch wild cows. We troed dar bones, arter
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