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Browsing named entities in a specific section of James Redpath, The Roving Editor: or, Talks with Slaves in the Southern States.. Search the whole document.

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Sodom (Israel) (search for this): chapter 7
on of the writer, [From a private letter to Charles Sumner, by Dr. S. G. Howe, of Boston.] I have passed ten days in New Orleans — not unprofitably, I trust — in examining the public institutions, the schools, asylums, hospitals, prisons, etc. With the exception of the first, there is little hope of amelioration. I know not how much merit there may be in their system, but I do know that in the administration of the penal code, there are abominations which should bring down the fate of Sodom upon the city. A man suspected of a crime and awaiting his trial, is thrust into a pandemonium filled with convicts and outlaws, where, herding and sleeping in common with hardened wretches, he breathes an atmosphere whose least evil is its physical impurity; and which is loaded with blasphemies, obscenities, and the sound of hellish orgies, intermingled with the clanking of the chains of the more furious, who are not caged, but who move about in the crowd with fettered legs and hands.
Canadian (United States) (search for this): chapter 7
hat my companion had stated. We had travelled rapidly; no one had left the neighborhood before us; yet this old man had learnt of the event some hours previous to our arrival. It had been passed from plantation to plantation, and thus it had reached him. I listened to the story, and treasured up its facts. It seems to me that here lies a power, by means of which a formidable insurrection, directed by white men, can safely be formed and consummated. And the slaves know this fact. The Canadian fugitives understand it; and are thoroughly systematizing this Underground Telegraph. Many of them are constantly passing to and fro in the Slave States with perfect impunity. Through it, hundreds of the relatives and friends of men, who have already secured their freedom, have been informed of the means by which they can obtain the liberty so eagerly desired. By its operations, when the appropriate hour for sounding the alarum shall have come, speedily, surely and swiftly, will the news
Doniphan (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
extent, and the whole arrangement of roads is entirely different.) Again, the farmer said, I am feeding his niggers. They steal my chickens and eggs and vegetables. I complained to the overseer about it: D — n it, he said, shoot them — we won't complain. But then, if he shot them, he would have to pay their market value; and, besides, he had been hungry himself often, and had not the heart to interfere with the poor starving slaves. He was soon obliged to sell out. I met him in Doniphan county, Kansas. He is a Republican now, and thanks God for the opportunity of belonging to an open anti-slavery party. The accounts often published of the condition of the poor whites of the South are not exaggerated, and could not well be. There is more pauperism at the South than at the North : in spite of the philosophy of the Southern socialists, who claim that slavery prevents that unfortunate condition of free society. So, also, although Stringfellow claims that black prostitution prevent
Central America (search for this): chapter 7
Documents, passim. West of the Mississippi and in the State of Missouri, therefore, the friend of the slave, from the inevitable operation of potent political and commercial forces, may leave, to a great extent, the fate of slavery to peaceful causes or other than distinctively abolition movements. Westward, slavery cannot go. Northward, its influence daily diminishes. The sentiment of the Eastern world is hostile to it always. Can it extend Southward? It will look in vain to Central America. The same mixed races who hate the modern Norman in Mexico inhabit those regions, and are animated by the same true spirit; and the attempt, if ever made, to subdue this people, in order to extend the area of bondage, will justly precipitate a war with the powers of Europe. The South does not dare to hazard a war with such great powers on such an issue. The islands of the American Archipelago are to-day almost exclusively in the hands of the liberated African race. The first serio
vely abolition movements. Westward, slavery cannot go. Northward, its influence daily diminishes. The sentiment of the Eastern world is hostile to it always. Can it extend Southward? It will look in vain to Central America. The same mixed races who hate the modern Norman in Mexico inhabit those regions, and are animated by the same true spirit; and the attempt, if ever made, to subdue this people, in order to extend the area of bondage, will justly precipitate a war with the powers of Europe. The South does not dare to hazard a war with such great powers on such an issue. The islands of the American Archipelago are to-day almost exclusively in the hands of the liberated African race. The first serious attempt at annexation will put them entirely in the possession of the blacks. Cuba has already, within her borders, seven thousand self-emancipated citizens; and it is a fact, well known in our State Department, that the Spanish rulers of that island would unhesitatingly arm t
Oklahoma (Oklahoma, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
mpion of the South, will be the first to succumb to the spirit of the North, and realize the truth that they who take the sword shall perish by it. South of Kansas lies a fertile region already darkened by the curse of slavery. It is the Indian Territory. It will soon be thrown open for the settlement of the white race. Another struggle will ensue — and another victory for freedom; for the men who, at Yellow Stone, fired at Federal troops, and, at Osawattomie--seventeen against four hundred--made the embattled marauders bite the dust, will be there to avenge the martyrs of Lawrence and the Marais des Cygnes. Will they have no other aid? Yes; for there are negroes enslaved in the Indian Territory: the descendants of the bravest warriors America has produced — the hunted maroons, who, for forty years, in the swamps of Florida, defied the skill and armies of the United States. They hate slavery and the race that upholds it, and are longing for an opportunity to display that hatre
Platte City (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ivious; liars, parasites, hypocrites, and thieves; without self-respect, religious aspirations, or the nobler traits which characterize humanity. They are almost as degraded intellectually as the lower hordes of inland Irish, or the indolent semi-civilized North American Indians; or the less than human white-skinned vermin who fester in the Five Points cellars, the North street saloons, or the dancing houses and levee of New Orleans or Charleston. Not so vile, however, as the rabble of the Platte Region, who distinguished themselves as the champions of the South in Kansas. Morally, they are on a level with the whites' around them. The slaveholder steals their labor, rights and children; they steal his chickens, hogs and vegetables. They often must lie, or submit to be whipped. Truth, at such a price — they seem to think — is far too precious to be wasted on white folks. They are necessarily extremely filthy; for their cabins are dirty, small and uncomfortable; and they have neit
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
sily used by the ruling race as white-chokered chains. The more obsequious that they are — the more treacherous to their own aspirations — the more they are flattered and esteemed by the tyrants whose work they do. I attended a colored church at Savannah. The subject of discourse was the death of John the Baptist: Bredren, de ‘vang'list does not tell us ‘bout anoder circumstance ‘bout de text, but de legions ob de church has unformed us. When Herodeyus got hold ob de plate dat da put de head— are circumstances of daily occurrence in every Southern State. IX. I heard a planter one day sneering at the ladies who advocated woman's rights. He was shocked that women should attempt to go out of their sphere. On his plantation, near Savannah, I saw women filling dung carts, hoeing, driving oxen, ploughing, and engaged in many other similar employments. Is it within woman's sphere to perform such labors? X. One of the proprietors of the Montgomery (Alabama) Mail, at the peri
J. C. Fremont (search for this): chapter 7
ve. The Republican party, the champion of white laborers, will plead their cause and insure them success. To this extent, therefore, the friend of the slave can consistently aid the Republican party; but, this end gained, it will be his duty to desert and war against it. For it is publicly pledged never to interfere, by political action, with slavery where it already exists; but, on the contrary, to preserve and defend whatever may be protected by the aegis of State sovereignty. See J. C. Fremont's Letter of Acceptance, and the Republican Campaign Documents, passim. West of the Mississippi and in the State of Missouri, therefore, the friend of the slave, from the inevitable operation of potent political and commercial forces, may leave, to a great extent, the fate of slavery to peaceful causes or other than distinctively abolition movements. Westward, slavery cannot go. Northward, its influence daily diminishes. The sentiment of the Eastern world is hostile to it always.
Tom Johnson (search for this): chapter 7
s, and in every variety of method, from the time they are born till they draw their last breath. How can they respect themselves, when they know that their mothers are ranked with the beasts that perish — sold, exchanged, bought, forced to beget children, as cows and sheep are bartered and reared for breeding purposes? As for the religious negroes--the pious slaves --I have no patience with the blasphemous and infernal ingenuity which breeds and preserves these unfortunate creatures. Dr. Johnson praised the youth, who, having seduced a young girl in a fit of animal excitement, on being asked by her, after the fact, Have we not done wrong? promptly replied, Yes. For, he said, although I ravished her body, I was not so bad as to wish to ravish her mind. Our slavemasters are not so generous. The perpetrators of the most tyrannical despotism that the world ever saw, still, not content with degrading the body of their bondmen into real estate, they seek, by the same priestly machi
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