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United States. They hate slavery and the race that upholds it, and are longing for an opportunity to display that hatred. Not far from this territory, in a neighboring province of Mexico, live a nation of trained negro soldiers — the far-famed Florida Indians, who, after baffling and defying the United States, and after having been treacherously enslaved by the Creeks, incited thereto by Federal officials, bravely resisted their oppressors and made an Exodus, the grandest since the days of Moses, to a land of freedom. Already have their oppressors felt their prowess; and their historian tells us--they will be heard from again. See The Exiles of Florida, by Joshua R. Giddings. Mark the significant warning! Arrizonia is a mining country. There is gold, silver and copper there. It requires skilled labor to extract them from the ore. Free laborers will flock to these regions as soon as it is profitable to go, and overwhelm, by mere numerical force, the champions of the Southern
Parson Brownlow (search for this): chapter 7
hich-but one sentence of his account, for its characteristic Southern inhumanity to the negro, I shall never forget to my dying day. They piled pretty green wood on the fire, to make it burn slow; he gave one terrible yell before he died; and, every time the wind blew from him, there was the d----dest stench of burnt flesh. D----n it, how it did smell. This was said, laughingly. Several well authenticated cases of the same fiendish torture have occurred within the last five years. Parson Brownlow, as I have already stated, eulogized the barbarity in one instance. XI. As against whites, in courts of justice, the negro has not the faintest chance of fairness. I could illustrate this statement by citing examples; but, as a South Carolina Governor has confessed the fact, it will suffice to quote his admission. Says Governor Adams in his message for 1855: The administration of our laws, in relation to our colored population, by our courts of magistrates and freeholders, as thes
South-Side Adams (search for this): chapter 7
ow it did smell. This was said, laughingly. Several well authenticated cases of the same fiendish torture have occurred within the last five years. Parson Brownlow, as I have already stated, eulogized the barbarity in one instance. XI. As against whites, in courts of justice, the negro has not the faintest chance of fairness. I could illustrate this statement by citing examples; but, as a South Carolina Governor has confessed the fact, it will suffice to quote his admission. Says Governor Adams in his message for 1855: The administration of our laws, in relation to our colored population, by our courts of magistrates and freeholders, as these courts are at present constituted, calls loudly for reform. Their decisions are Rarely in conformity with justice or humanity. I have felt constrained, in a majority of the cases brought to my notice, either to modify the sentence, or set it aside altogether. XII. Colonel Benton, in a lecture that he delivered in Boston, had the a
S. G. Howe (search for this): chapter 7
ct I better not tell de way I comed: for dar's lots more b<*> comina same way I did. V. Scenes in a slave prison. Dr. S. G. Howe Extract from a private letter from Dr. S. G. Howe, of Boston, to Senator Charles Sumner, describing a visit Dr. S. G. Howe, of Boston, to Senator Charles Sumner, describing a visit to the prison of New Orleans, and published by permission of the writer, [From a private letter to Charles Sumner, by Dr. S. G. Howe, of Boston.] I have passed ten days in New Orleans — not unprofitably, I trust — in examining the public institDr. S. G. Howe, of Boston.] I have passed ten days in New Orleans — not unprofitably, I trust — in examining the public institutions, the schools, asylums, hospitals, prisons, etc. With the exception of the first, there is little hope of amelioration. I know not how much merit there may be in their system, but I do know that in the administration of the penal code, there a their system, and urge, in their defence, that he is as happy as a brute, and is incapable of any higher enjoyment. S. G. Howe. Vi. My object. A Review of the present state of the anti-slavery battle some Recommendations, and a clo
Oliver Cromwell (search for this): chapter 7
he different States, to provide their bondmen with the comforts of a home or the decencies of life. That I had material enough, my summary will show. I did not go South to collect the materials for a distant war of words against it. Far more earnest was my aim. I saw or believed that one cycle of anti-slavery warfare was about to close — the cycle whose correspondences in history are the eras of John Ball, the herald of the brave Jack Cade; of the Humble Remonstrants who preceded Oliver Cromwell, and the Iconoclastic Puritans; and of the Encyclopaedists of the age of Louis the Sixteenth, whose writings prepared the way for the French Revolution. I believed that the cycle of action was at hand. I considered it, therefore, of importance to know the feelings and aspirations of the slaves. I cared little, comparatively with this object, to ascertain their physical condition. I never even read a book on the subject — a volume of fiction alone excepted — until the manuscripts of <
Tank Lord (search for this): chapter 7
ees, an‘ we would almos' ‘spect de judgment day was comin‘, dar would be such loud nibrations, as de preacher called dem; ‘specially down by de lake. I b'lieve God is no inspector of persons; an‘ he knows his childer, and kin hear dem jest as quick in de Juniper Swamp as in de great churches what I seed in New York, whar dey don ‘t ‘low a man, as I'm told, to go in thar, if he hasn't been allers customed to sit on spring bottomed cheers, and sofas and planners and all dem sort of tings. Tank de Lord, he don't tink so much ‘bout spring-bottom cheers as his poor critters do — dat's a fac‘. I was fered to peep inside dem ar rich churches, and I ‘spects de blessed Lord hisself dunno much more ‘bout dar insides dan I does. . . . . Oh, dey were nice prayers we used to have sometimes, an' I donno but de old preacher is dar now. Dar is families growed up in dat ar Dismal Swamp dat never seed a white man, an' would be skeered most to def to see one. Some runaways went de
Lafayette (search for this): chapter 7
of the abolitionists would undoubtedly prolong the existence of bondage; but where, owing to its peculiar geographical position, slavery will soon be drowned by the advancing and increasing tide of Northern emigration. Neither will the mere prevention of the extension of slavery kill it. Within its present limits, it may live a thousand years. There is land enough to support the present races, and their increase, for that length of time there. Unless we strike a blow for the slaves — as Lafayette and his Frenchmen did for the revolutionary sires — or unless they strike a blow for themselves, as the negroes of Jamaica and Hayti, to their immortal honor, did--American slavery has a long and devastating future before it, in which, by the stern necessities of its nature, Freedom or the Union must crouch and die beneath its potent sceptre of death and desolation. II. The field negroes, as a class, are coarse, filthy, brutal, and lascivious; liars, parasites, hypocrites, and thieves;
aroused for the safety of his property in man --this State, so recently the champion of the South, will be the first to succumb to the spirit of the North, and realize the truth that they who take the sword shall perish by it. South of Kansas lies a fertile region already darkened by the curse of slavery. It is the Indian Territory. It will soon be thrown open for the settlement of the white race. Another struggle will ensue — and another victory for freedom; for the men who, at Yellow Stone, fired at Federal troops, and, at Osawattomie--seventeen against four hundred--made the embattled marauders bite the dust, will be there to avenge the martyrs of Lawrence and the Marais des Cygnes. Will they have no other aid? Yes; for there are negroes enslaved in the Indian Territory: the descendants of the bravest warriors America has produced — the hunted maroons, who, for forty years, in the swamps of Florida, defied the skill and armies of the United States. They hate slavery and th
Joshua R. Giddings (search for this): chapter 7
f Mexico, live a nation of trained negro soldiers — the far-famed Florida Indians, who, after baffling and defying the United States, and after having been treacherously enslaved by the Creeks, incited thereto by Federal officials, bravely resisted their oppressors and made an Exodus, the grandest since the days of Moses, to a land of freedom. Already have their oppressors felt their prowess; and their historian tells us--they will be heard from again. See The Exiles of Florida, by Joshua R. Giddings. Mark the significant warning! Arrizonia is a mining country. There is gold, silver and copper there. It requires skilled labor to extract them from the ore. Free laborers will flock to these regions as soon as it is profitable to go, and overwhelm, by mere numerical force, the champions of the Southern system. The wild Indians, too, are the friends of the negro. The diplomacy of the Florida Indians has made them the eternal enemies of the South. The nation will see this fact w
Charles Sumner (search for this): chapter 7
p my mind to leave. . . . . ‘Spect I better not tell de way I comed: for dar's lots more b<*> comina same way I did. V. Scenes in a slave prison. Dr. S. G. Howe Extract from a private letter from Dr. S. G. Howe, of Boston, to Senator Charles Sumner, describing a visit to the prison of New Orleans, and published by permission of the writer, [From a private letter to Charles Sumner, by Dr. S. G. Howe, of Boston.] I have passed ten days in New Orleans — not unprofitably, I trust Charles Sumner, by Dr. S. G. Howe, of Boston.] I have passed ten days in New Orleans — not unprofitably, I trust — in examining the public institutions, the schools, asylums, hospitals, prisons, etc. With the exception of the first, there is little hope of amelioration. I know not how much merit there may be in their system, but I do know that in the administration of the penal code, there are abominations which should bring down the fate of Sodom upon the city. A man suspected of a crime and awaiting his trial, is thrust into a pandemonium filled with convicts and outlaws, where, herding and sleeping
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