hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Kansas (Kansas, United States) 104 0 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 64 0 Browse Search
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) 48 0 Browse Search
Georgia (Georgia, United States) 46 0 Browse Search
Alabama (Alabama, United States) 44 0 Browse Search
Missouri (Missouri, United States) 44 0 Browse Search
Augusta (Georgia, United States) 43 1 Browse Search
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) 41 1 Browse Search
United States (United States) 34 0 Browse Search
Wilmington, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) 25 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of James Redpath, The Roving Editor: or, Talks with Slaves in the Southern States.. Search the whole document.

Found 260 total hits in 72 results.

... 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
nd the future Presidents be? Not in free homes, I know. Crimes! Does the reader know that, by the laws of Virginia, if a slave commits a capital offence, he may be pardoned by being sold out of the State--the owner of him pocketing the proceeds of the auction? But statistics refute Colonel Benton's statement. It is capable of demonstration that twenty-five thousand negroes are annually sold from the Northern or slave-breeding to the Southern or slave-buying Slave States. See Chase and Sanborn's North and South, and the authorities they cite. I have seen families separated and sold to different masters in Virginia; I have spoken with hundreds of slaves in the Carolinas, who were sold, they told me, from their wives and children in the same inhuman State; and I have seen slave-pens and slave-cars filled with the unhappy victims of this internal and infernal trade, who were travelling for the city of New Orleans; where, also, I have witnessed at least a score of public negro aucti
e it. Through all the multitudinous mutations of their history, this hatred has been the only established principle which pervaded the entire nation. If color is to be the badge of bondage, they know that they must succumb to it, if the Southern Norman obtains dominion in their land. For the Mexicans of the frontier provinces are of mixed Indian, Negro and Spanish origin. There are numbers of fugitives from American slavery among them, who superadd to a deadly national animosity, a still stro Westward, slavery cannot go. Northward, its influence daily diminishes. The sentiment of the Eastern world is hostile to it always. Can it extend Southward? It will look in vain to Central America. The same mixed races who hate the modern Norman in Mexico inhabit those regions, and are animated by the same true spirit; and the attempt, if ever made, to subdue this people, in order to extend the area of bondage, will justly precipitate a war with the powers of Europe. The South does not
families, and the future Presidents be? Not in free homes, I know. Crimes! Does the reader know that, by the laws of Virginia, if a slave commits a capital offence, he may be pardoned by being sold out of the State--the owner of him pocketing the proceeds of the auction? But statistics refute Colonel Benton's statement. It is capable of demonstration that twenty-five thousand negroes are annually sold from the Northern or slave-breeding to the Southern or slave-buying Slave States. See Chase and Sanborn's North and South, and the authorities they cite. I have seen families separated and sold to different masters in Virginia; I have spoken with hundreds of slaves in the Carolinas, who were sold, they told me, from their wives and children in the same inhuman State; and I have seen slave-pens and slave-cars filled with the unhappy victims of this internal and infernal trade, who were travelling for the city of New Orleans; where, also, I have witnessed at least a score of public
North American Indians (search for this): chapter 7
sites, hypocrites, and thieves; without self-respect, religious aspirations, or the nobler traits which characterize humanity. They are almost as degraded intellectually as the lower hordes of inland Irish, or the indolent semi-civilized North American Indians; or the less than human white-skinned vermin who fester in the Five Points cellars, the North street saloons, or the dancing houses and levee of New Orleans or Charleston. Not so vile, however, as the rabble of the Platte Region, who distates. They hate slavery and the race that upholds it, and are longing for an opportunity to display that hatred. Not far from this territory, in a neighboring province of Mexico, live a nation of trained negro soldiers — the far-famed Florida Indians, who, after baffling and defying the United States, and after having been treacherously enslaved by the Creeks, incited thereto by Federal officials, bravely resisted their oppressors and made an Exodus, the grandest since the days of Moses, to
Simon Simms (search for this): chapter 7
o ketch his runaway. So de colored folks got jist as much devil in dem as white folks; I sometimes tink de are jist as voracious arter money. Da ‘tray de fugitives to dar masters. Sometimes de masters comes and shoots dem down dead on de spot. . . . I saw wid my own eyes when dey shot Jacob. Dat is too bad to ‘member. God will not forget it; never, I bet ye. Six white men coined upon him afore lie knowed nothin‘ at all ‘bout it most. Jist de first ting Jacob seed was his old master, Simon Simms, of Suffolk, Virginny, standing right afore him. Dem ar men — all on em — had a gun apiece, an' dey every one of dem pointed right straight to de head of poor Jacob. He felt scared most to def. Old Simms hollered out to him--Jake! You run a step, you nigger, and I'll blow yer brains out. Jacob did n't know for de life on him what to do. He feared to gin up: he too scared to run; lie dunno what to do. Six guns wid number two shot, aimed at your head is n't nothina, I tell ye. Takes
Stringfellow (search for this): chapter 7
obliged to sell out. I met him in Doniphan county, Kansas. He is a Republican now, and thanks God for the opportunity of belonging to an open anti-slavery party. The accounts often published of the condition of the poor whites of the South are not exaggerated, and could not well be. There is more pauperism at the South than at the North : in spite of the philosophy of the Southern socialists, who claim that slavery prevents that unfortunate condition of free society. So, also, although Stringfellow claims that black prostitution prevents white harlotry, there are as many, or more, public courtesans of the dominant race, in the Southern cities I have visited, than in Northern towns of similar population. Slavery prevents no old evils, but breeds a host of new ones. The poor whites, as a class, are extremely illiterate, ruffianly, and superstitious. VI. No complaints are ever made of the indolence or incapacity of the negroes, when they are stimulated by the hopes of wages or of
Stephen A. Douglas (search for this): chapter 7
ony, by those who should be all in all to them, as husbands, sons, and brothers. I cannot use too strong language in reference to this subject, for I know that it will meet with a heartfelt response from every Southern woman. This lady is Mrs. Douglas, a native of Virginia, and a pro-slavery woman, who was imprisoned in a common jail at Norfolk, for the heinous crime of teaching free colored children to read the word of God! At the time of the Revolution, pure blacks were everywhere to be moral debasement. XIV. The assertion that without slave labor, cotton, rice and sugar could not be grown in the Southern States--that these staples would not and cannot be cultivated by white men — that the choice, to use the language of Senator Douglas, is between the negro and the crocodile, is utterly without foundation, and is refuted by facts. There is nothing more common in Georgia and Alabama than to see white men, and white women too, at work in the fields at every hour of the day.
a negro burned to death no chance of justice for negroes in courts of law against white men a Southern Gubernatorial confession of this fact slave breeding Col. Benton's statement refuted by statistics a Southern confession who hate negroes in the Southern States can the Southern staples be cultivated without slavery? prooice or humanity. I have felt constrained, in a majority of the cases brought to my notice, either to modify the sentence, or set it aside altogether. XII. Colonel Benton, in a lecture that he delivered in Boston, had the audacity to assert that slaves are seldom sold by their masters, excepting for debt or faults, or crimes. e commits a capital offence, he may be pardoned by being sold out of the State--the owner of him pocketing the proceeds of the auction? But statistics refute Colonel Benton's statement. It is capable of demonstration that twenty-five thousand negroes are annually sold from the Northern or slave-breeding to the Southern or slave-
rican slavery has a long and devastating future before it, in which, by the stern necessities of its nature, Freedom or the Union must crouch and die beneath its potent sceptre of death and desolation. II. The field negroes, as a class, are coarse, filthy, brutal, and lascivious; liars, parasites, hypocrites, and thieves; without self-respect, religious aspirations, or the nobler traits which characterize humanity. They are almost as degraded intellectually as the lower hordes of inland Irish, or the indolent semi-civilized North American Indians; or the less than human white-skinned vermin who fester in the Five Points cellars, the North street saloons, or the dancing houses and levee of New Orleans or Charleston. Not so vile, however, as the rabble of the Platte Region, who distinguished themselves as the champions of the South in Kansas. Morally, they are on a level with the whites' around them. The slaveholder steals their labor, rights and children; they steal his chicken
John C. Vaughan (search for this): chapter 7
hose roots are watered by inhumanity. XV. Slavery is the sum of all villainies. Ii. The insurrection hero. Hon. J. C. Vaughan This chapter is a Contribution by the Hon. J. C. Vaughan, formerly of South Carolina, now of Kansas: once the Hon. J. C. Vaughan, formerly of South Carolina, now of Kansas: once a Southern slaveholder, now one of the truest champions of freedom in the nation. It is a graphic picture of the terror caused by the rumor of an insurrection, and a vivid sketch of the character of a noble negro Patriot who was betrayed in an attemt I was in favor of a servile insurrection. I believe I found no one who approved of such a scheme of abolition. John C. Vaughan was in the room. He told us of the terror which such events inspired in Southern communities, whenever it was belieunt of the death of the heroic slave. This chapter is the result. After a preliminary word on slave insurrections, Mr. Vaughan proceeds: The story of Isaac. All other perils are understood. Fire upon land, or storm at sea, wrapping mortal
... 2 3 4 5 6 7 8