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Browsing named entities in a specific section of William A. Smith, DD. President of Randolph-Macon College , and Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy., Lectures on the Philosophy and Practice of Slavery as exhibited in the Institution of Domestic Slavery in the United States: withe Duties of Masters to Slaves.. Search the whole document.

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Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
r best citizens — citizens who are at a vast remove from the fanaticism which stigmatizes those who are known as the ultra abolitionists of the country. The great family of Methodists in the District of Columbia, the slave States of Delaware and Maryland, in Western Virginia, and a part of Missouri, retain their connection with the abolition division of the M. E. Church. All along the line of division between the M. E. Church, North, and the M. E. Church, South,--running through Virginia, Kentucky, and Missouri,--the evils resulting from the conflict and strife of opinions on this subject are daily multiplying. The experiment of abolition fanaticism is progressing; and the souls as well as the bodies of men are in the crucible. It is clear that whilst we have slept, an enemy hath sown these tares, in our literature, our politics, and our theology. Two striking phenomena remain to be noticed and accounted for. Amid all the conflict of opinion and feeling upon this subject,--which
Puritan (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
cy of erroneous opinions on the subject of slavery, any mor<*>than at the results which they threaten. At an early period in our history, Thomas Jefferson denounced domestic slavery as sinful, per se, and declared that there was no attribute in the Divine mind which could take sides with the whites in a controversy between the races: thus assuming in this remark, that the providences as well as the attributes of the Deity are against the slaveholder. Owing to the prominence given by our Puritan fathers to the higher institutions of learning, together with the fact that the soil and the climate of New England were unfavorable to agricultural pursuits, citizens of these States have, from an early period in the history of the republic, supplied the most of the text-books for the schools and colleges of the whole country. This grossly offensive error of Mr. Jefferson has been more or less diffused through the whole of these text-books. It has been among the first of speculations upo
Jefferson, Ashtabula County, Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
men with whom I deal in these lectures. I lay all such out of the account. They are men not to be reasoned with. No: the men of whom I speak, both North and South, are candid, honest men. I personally know many of them at the North. I have met them on great battle-fields, where more than blood was shed! I know them to be good men and true, and I believe the same of the large class they represent. With many of those at the South who affiliate with them in opinion as firm believers in Jefferson's doctrine, or whose embryo opinions excite painful misgivings of mind, I have often communed freely, and have equal confidence in their integrity and honesty. The whole taken together form a very numerous class, and may be safely regarded as embodying the national belief and feeling on the subject of slavery. And yet we find that slavery is a great practical truth, a fixed fact in the country. Now, can it be true that this opinion and feeling embodies a great abstract truth — a fundame
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 1
rly period in our history, Thomas Jefferson denounced domestic slavery as sinful, per se, and declared that there was no attribute in the Divine mind which could take sides with the whites in a controversy between the races: thus assuming in this remark, that the providences as well as the attributes of the Deity are against the slaveholder. Owing to the prominence given by our Puritan fathers to the higher institutions of learning, together with the fact that the soil and the climate of New England were unfavorable to agricultural pursuits, citizens of these States have, from an early period in the history of the republic, supplied the most of the text-books for the schools and colleges of the whole country. This grossly offensive error of Mr. Jefferson has been more or less diffused through the whole of these text-books. It has been among the first of speculations upon abstract truth presented to the minds of the American people. It has been studiously inculcated from professors
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
is in vain to appeal to the fact that Mr. Jefferson, though a profound statesman, and to some extent a logician, was neither a divine nor a metaphysician; and that no people on the globe have shared more largely in the blessings of a bountiful Providence than those of the Southern States of this Union. In the progress of civilization and religion, they have advanced more rapidly than any communities in the country. Still, Mr. Jefferson's name does not lose its enchantment; and having already learned to despise the unexampled blessings of Providence, many of the Southern people actually believed — until railroad communications began to dispel the illusion — that their own happy States were really falling back in civilization to the darkness of the middle ages. Add to all this, the halls of legislation continue to echo the opinion that domestic slavery is a great moral, political, and social evil. In this connection, the phrase, moral evil, is restricted to its appropriate meaning,
Wayland (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
stem of African slavery which may be demanded to adapt it to the progress of civilization. Regarding the whole subject in this light, the duty of thoroughly investigating it seems to me to be laid upon the country as a moral necessity. It is useless to talk of delicacy and humiliation, in the presence of such fruits as a false philosophy has already borne plentifully throughout the land. As your chosen instructor, I owe you a service. I dare not give up your minds to the dominion of Wayland's Philosophy, (your text,) nor to any other text on this subject, now known to the country. I propose to lead your way in exploring the mine of truth which we may assume to underlie the system of African slavery. We may look with confidence to reach these results: 1. That the philosophy of Jefferson is false, and that the opposite is true, namely, that the great abstract principle of domestic slavery is, per se, right; and therefore it is not in the use but in the abuse of this princip
Lecture I. Introductory remarks on the subject of African slavery in the United States. General subjency which certain popular errors on the subject of African slavery have acquired, and the extent to which theytical union. A secret suspicion of the morality of African slavery in the South, occupies the minds of many ofs republic in which climate and soil are adapted to African labor — that precisely there the institution of domf the public mind in this country on the subject of African slavery, and it find no efficient remedy, we can sect doctrine of Mr. Jefferson, that the principle of African slavery is, per se, sinful, and that, as such, the led to abolish or even to modify the institution of African slavery, does it not afford a strong and clear presess ourselves to any modifications in the system of African slavery which may be demanded to adapt it to the prtruth which we may assume to underlie the system of African slavery. We may look with confidence to reach thes
Delaware (Delaware, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
untry have been torn asunder. The flags of their time-honored unions are trailing in the dust; and they have ceased to operate as bonds to our political union. A secret suspicion of the morality of African slavery in the South, occupies the minds of many of our best citizens — citizens who are at a vast remove from the fanaticism which stigmatizes those who are known as the ultra abolitionists of the country. The great family of Methodists in the District of Columbia, the slave States of Delaware and Maryland, in Western Virginia, and a part of Missouri, retain their connection with the abolition division of the M. E. Church. All along the line of division between the M. E. Church, North, and the M. E. Church, South,--running through Virginia, Kentucky, and Missouri,--the evils resulting from the conflict and strife of opinions on this subject are daily multiplying. The experiment of abolition fanaticism is progressing; and the souls as well as the bodies of men are in the crucibl
West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
The flags of their time-honored unions are trailing in the dust; and they have ceased to operate as bonds to our political union. A secret suspicion of the morality of African slavery in the South, occupies the minds of many of our best citizens — citizens who are at a vast remove from the fanaticism which stigmatizes those who are known as the ultra abolitionists of the country. The great family of Methodists in the District of Columbia, the slave States of Delaware and Maryland, in Western Virginia, and a part of Missouri, retain their connection with the abolition division of the M. E. Church. All along the line of division between the M. E. Church, North, and the M. E. Church, South,--running through Virginia, Kentucky, and Missouri,--the evils resulting from the conflict and strife of opinions on this subject are daily multiplying. The experiment of abolition fanaticism is progressing; and the souls as well as the bodies of men are in the crucible. It is clear that whilst we
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 1
Lecture I. Introductory remarks on the subject of African slavery in the United States. General subject enunciated Why this discussion may be regarded as humiliating by Southern people other stand-points, however, disclose an urgent necessity, at this time, for a thorough investigation of the whole subject the results to which it is the object of these lectures to conduct the mind. the great question which arises in discussing the slavery of the African population of this country — correctly known as Domestic slavery --is this: Is the institution of domestic slavery sinful? The position I propose to maintain in these lectures is, that slavery, per se, is right; or that the great abstract principle of slavery is right, because it is a fundamental principle of the social state; and that domestic slavery, as an institution, is fully justified by the condition and circumstances (essential and relative) of the African race in this country, and therefore equally right.
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