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Browsing named entities in a specific section of William A. Smith, DD. President of Randolph-Macon College , and Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy., Lectures on the Philosophy and Practice of Slavery as exhibited in the Institution of Domestic Slavery in the United States: withe Duties of Masters to Slaves.. Search the whole document.

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New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 8
lity of social rights and privileges with the whites? If they were not for the latter, it is very plain that they were not for the former. It is quite certain that they were not prepared for either. If they were, why did not the Puritans of New England allow them this sovereignty and equality? By their consent and active cooperation, they were brought into the country. Shall we revilingly say, with some of their ungrateful descendants, that the good sense and love of liberty which had so l, no less than their good sense, induced them to adopt the plan of domestic government, or slavery, sanctioned by the usages of all civilized nations in similar circumstances. If, for any cause, a horde of barbarians should be introduced into New England in the present day, in numbers too great to be absorbed without injury, and in a physical condition making it improper to permit their absorption by intermarriage with themselves, as in the case of the Africans, does any man in his senses pret
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
neous amalgamation, they are entitled to it here; and much more so than a certain other class, who are flocking into the country, and to whom the right is accorded without scruple! This latter, however, is certainly not the case, as the facts before alluded to do clearly show. If, then, they be entitled to political freedom, they should be removed to another territory. Africa is the rightful home of the Africans. Thither they must go, if they should ever be fitted for self-government. Providence has wisely forecast this result, and is rapidly building up a free government on the coast of Africa, as their future home, and the centre of civilization and Christianity to that long-be-nighted continent. But what of the question-Are they indeed fitted for political sovereignty? That many of the free colored population, and some among the slaves, may be so, I think is more than probably true. Of the former I would say, that it is a duty they owe themselves no less than the country t
ure VIII: domestic slavery, as a system of government for the Africans in America, examined and defended on the ground of its adaptation to the present condition of the race. There should be a separate and subordinate government for our African population objection answered Africans are not competent to that measure of self-government which entitles a man to political sovereignty they were not prepared for freedom when first brought into the country, hence they were placed under theion of the Southern people? I think myself well and fully informed on this point. I hazard nothing in asserting, that it is the general and well-nigh the universal opinion of the intelligent and pious portion of our entire population, that our African subjects, taken as a whole, are not fitted for any form of political freedom of which we can conceive; that they are not in a condition to use it to their own advantage, or the peace of the communities in which they reside; and that to confer it
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 8
Lecture VIII: domestic slavery, as a system of government for the Africans in America, examined and defended on the ground of its adaptation to the present condition of the race. There should be a separate and subordinate government for our African population objection answered Africans are not competent to that measure of self-government which entitles a man to political sovereignty they were not prepared for freedom when first brought into the country, hence they were placed under the domestic form of government the humanity of this policy in the opinion of Southern people they are still unprepared the fanaticism and rashness of some, and the inexcusable wickedness of others, who oppose the South. it having been proved that both the doctrine and the assumption of fact by Northern fanatics, in regard to the claim of the African to a republican form of government, are false, and that the presumption is in favor of the position of the South, that domestic slavery i