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ean time Sherman had made his brilliant and successful campaign to Atlanta, and by strategy and hard fighting had driven Johnston into that place to be deprived of his command. By strategy he had forced Hood, Johnston's successor, out of Atlanta, anJohnston's successor, out of Atlanta, and captured the town. Then sending Thomas with sufficient force back to Nashville to punish the rashness of Hood, he had cut loose from his base, and made his great march from Atlanta to the sea; and, under orders from Grant, was on his more difficult but no less successful march through the Carolinas, where Johnston, restored to command by the despair of the rebel leaders, was vainly preparing to resist him. Spring opened, and the auspicious moment for which Grant had anxiously waited was at haf the James threatened Richmond on the south-east, and the army of the Potomac, south of Petersburg, and between Lee and Johnston, only waited for his orders to commence the battle, or series of battles, which should overthrow the hard-pressed rebel
e, under a tree which has since been cut into toothpicks as memorials of that important occasion. Lee came crestfallen and humiliated, but with the bearing of a great commander, and the formal courtesy of an aristocrat; Grant came quiet and unassuming, and with a republican simplicity of manner. They had met before, but probably had never formed an acquaintance or exchanged words. When Grant, an unknown subaltern, led a gallant charge at Chepultepec, Lee was a favorite on the staff of General Scott, and he had remained there till after secession had called for the preparations of war, and then, turning traitor to the government which had educated and honored him, carried the secrets of that government to its enemies, and joined them in their infamous rebellion. The subaltern who had once received only his contemptuous notice, was now his conqueror and the greatest general of America. The one had received the just rewards of patriotism, loyalty, and faithful service; the other the
laying plans and waiting the developments of other campaigns. a new clamor. Sherman's brilliant operations.--the final campaign. Grant the director. his strateg would be conquered. Grant's combined movements were made early in May, General Sherman succeeding him in the immediate command of the western army, Grant himselfGrant was not lost, there were occasional demands that he should give place to Sherman, who appeared more active. But Grant, undisturbed by such clamors, quietly puin that great and final success which the country desired. In the mean time Sherman had made his brilliant and successful campaign to Atlanta, and by strategy andt suggestions from other officers or the government. His strategy had brought Sherman's grand army from Savannah into North Carolina almost within reach, and had moreat. Moreover, under his direction, as commander of all the national armies, Sherman had won his victories in Georgia, made his grand march to the sea, and moved t
April 7th, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 8
national authority was rapidly diminishing by the desertion of the disheartened men. Not only was it pursued by the victorious army of the Potomac, but by Grant's strategy at Lynchburg, whither it was retreating, it was confronted by Hancock's forces from the Shenandoah Valley, and Stoneman's strong cavalry force was approaching from the west. While the pursuit was still in progress, Grant, anxious to avoid the further effusion of blood, sent to Lee the following communication:-- April 7, 1865. General: The result of the last week must convince you of the hopelessness of further resistance on the part of the army of northern Virginia in this struggle. I feel that it is so, and regard it as my duty to shift from myself the responsibility of any further effusion of blood by asking of you the surrender of that portion of the Confederate States army known as the army of northern Virginia. U. S. Grant, Lieutenant General. To this Lee replied that he did not entertain Grant
ing in aid of these, to create diversions, or to hold detached rebel forces from joining the main rebel armies. Neither Richmond nor Atlanta were considered strategic points which it was important to reach and hold, but Grant's purpose was to reach and defeat the rebel armies, whether in front of those places, or wherever they might be made to give battle. In them was the strength of the rebellion, and with their defeat it would be conquered. Grant's combined movements were made early in May, General Sherman succeeding him in the immediate command of the western army, Grant himself, as before stated, directing the campaign in Virginia, General Meade being in immediate command. Cooperating with the army of the Potomac was a force under General Butler, which moved up the James River towards Richmond, and upon the operations of which Grant relied for early success, and another under General Sigel, which moved up the Shenandoah Valley. Though General Meade remained in immediate c
April 8th, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 8
inia in this struggle. I feel that it is so, and regard it as my duty to shift from myself the responsibility of any further effusion of blood by asking of you the surrender of that portion of the Confederate States army known as the army of northern Virginia. U. S. Grant, Lieutenant General. To this Lee replied that he did not entertain Grant's opinion of the hopelessness of further resistance, but asked what terms would be offered. Grant promptly and generously responded:-- April 8, 1865. General: Your note of last evening, in reply to mine of same date, asking the conditions on which I will accept the surrender of the army of northern Virginia, is just received. In reply, I would say that peace being my great desire, there is but one condition I would insist upon, namely, that the men and officers surrendered shall be disqualified for taking up arms again against the government of the United States until properly exchanged. I will meet you, or will designate office
lopments of other campaigns. a new clamor. Sherman's brilliant operations.--the final campaign. Grant the director. his strategy, Manceuvres, sagacity, and persistency. Flight of Jeff Davis and retreat of Lee's army. Grant chooses Lee's route. the pursuit. Lee in a Strait. correspondence. the interview at Appomattox. the surrender and Downfall of the rebel Confederacy. joy of the people. Grant's honors well won. what he had done. As soon as the general plan of the campaign of 1864 had been determined upon by Grant, he went vigorously to work to carry it into effect. He had no taste for show, and gave no time to it. He did not believe in delay, and would not tolerate it. Ready to work himself, and capable of accomplishing a great deal of labor, he set a good example, and required it to be followed. His headquarters were always distinguished by the quiet, business-like industry of his staff and clerks. And in the selection of his staff, he chose only men of capacity f
May 11th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 8
heir strongest works. It was from this place that he sent to Washington his famous despatch, which thrilled the country with its determined spirit, and became familiar throughout the land. It simply recounted, in the briefest possible terms, what had been done, and his own determination, It contained no boast, and no extravagant promise; no call for reenforcements, and no complaint; but it showed the spirit of the great commander, and that with which he inspired the army. in the field, May 11, 1864. We have now ended the sixth day of very heavy fighting. The result to this time is much in our favor. Our losses have been heavy, as well as those of the enemy. I think the loss of the enemy must be greater. We have taken over five thousand prisoners in battle, while he has taken from us but few, except stragglers. I propose to fight it out on this line if it takes all summer. The army of the Potomac was likely to fight its battles through now, if it never had before.
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