hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 304 0 Browse Search
Grant 250 10 Browse Search
England (United Kingdom) 114 0 Browse Search
America (Illinois, United States) 78 0 Browse Search
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) 66 0 Browse Search
Lee 47 5 Browse Search
Americans 34 0 Browse Search
Europe 34 0 Browse Search
Sherman 33 1 Browse Search
America (Netherlands) 32 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Matthew Arnold, Civilization in the United States: First and Last Impressions of America.. Search the whole document.

Found 424 total hits in 47 results.

1 2 3 4 5
he Americans of the United States are English people on the other side of the Atlantic. I learned it from Burke. But from Burke I learned, too, with what immense consequences and effects this simple matter — the settlement of a branch of the English people on the other side of the Atlantic — was, from the time of their constitution as an independent power, certainly and inevitably charged. Let me quote his own impressive and profound words on the acknowledgment of American independence, in 1782:-- A great revolution has happened — a revolution made, not by chopping and changing of power in any of the existing states, but by the appearance of a new state, of a new species, in a new part of the globe. It has made as great a change in all the relations, and balances, and gravitations of power, as the appearance of a new planet would in the system of the solar world. As for my esteeming it a hard destiny which should force me to visit the United States, I will borrow Goethe's wo<
Americans (search for this): chapter 2
,--a sovereign of the British type, and a House of Lords:-- If Americans could only get over the first wrench, and elect a king of the olde dirt of candidature. As to aristocratic ideas being foreign to Americans, I do not believe it for a moment; on the contrary, I believe theent I was not meaning to describe American civilization, and that Americans might at once be able to say, with perfect truth, that American crica in those northern, middle, and southwestern states, to which Americans have a right to refer us when we seek to know their civilization,quisite knowledge. But all that we hear from America — hear from Americans themselves — points, so far as I can see, to a great presence and against the gross outrage on America, insulted in the persons of Americans imprisoned in British dungeons ; we have them crying: The people treasure: illi robber et es triplex, indeed. And no doubt a few Americans, highly civilized individuals, hopping backwards and forwards ove
Matthew Arnold (search for this): chapter 2
America. Then our Boston friend turns to me again, says that it is vulgar people from the large cities who have given Mr. Arnold his dislike of American manners, and adds, that if it should ever happen that hard destiny should force Mr. Arnold to cMr. Arnold to cross the Atlantic, I should find in the smaller cities of the interior, in the northern, middle, and southwestern states, an elegant and simple social order, as entirely unknown in England, Germany, or Italy, as the private life of the dukes or princfrom the example of the people of the United States. I go back again to my Boston newspaper:-- In towns whose names Mr. Arnold never heard, and never will hear, there will be found almost invariably a group of people of good taste, good manners, . It is they who maintain the national credit, it is they who steadily improve the standard of national education. If Mr. Arnold should ever see them in their own homes, it is they who will show him what is the normal type of American manners.
their programme: Latin, Greek, German, French, Surveying, Chemistry, Astrology, Natural History, Mental Philosophy, Constitution, Bookkeeping, Trigonometry, etc. Alas, to quote Vauvenargues again: On ne corrigera jamais les hommes d'apprendre des choses inutiles! But good secondary schools, not with the programme of our classical and commercial academies, but with a serious programme — a programme really suited to the wants and capacities of those who are to be trained — this, I repeat, is what American civilization in my belief most requires, as it is what our civilization, too, at present most requires. The special present defects of both American civilization and ours are the kind of defects for which this is a natural remedy. I commend it to the attention of my friendly Boston critic in America; and some months hence, perhaps, when Mr. Barnum begins to require less space for his chronicles of Jumbo, my critic will tell me what he thinks of it. A word more about America
it seems doubtful whether America is not suffering from the predominance of Murdstone and Quinion herself — of Quinion at any rate. Yes, and of Murdstone too. Miss Bird, the best of travellers, and with the skill to relate her travels delightfully, met the rudimentary American type of Murdstone not far from Denver, and has descrimple social order in the older states will be too strong for it; or whether, on the other hand, it may be too strong for the elegant and simple social order. Miss Bird then describes the Chalmers family, a family with which, on her journey from Denver to the Rocky Mountains, she lodged for some time. Miss Bird, as those who haMiss Bird, as those who have read her books well know, is not a lackadaisical person, or in any way a fine lady; she can ride, catch, and saddle a horse, make herself agreeable, wash up plates, improvise lamps, teach knitting. But-- Oh (she says), what a hard, narrow life it is with which I am now in contact! A narrow and unattractive religion, which I
; he loves to count the prodigious number of acres of land there, the prodigious number of bushels of wheat raised. The voluntary principle, the principle of modern English Nonconformity, is on the same grand and impressive scale. There is nothing which piety and zeal have ever offered on the face of the earth as a tribute to religion and religious purposes, equal to that which has been done by the voluntary principle among the people of the United States. I cannot help thinking that my Boston informant mixes up, I say, the few lovers of perfection with the much more numerous representatives, serious, industrious, and in many ways admirable, of middle-class virtue; and imagines that in almost every town of the United States there is a group of lovers of perfection, whereas the lovers of perfection are much less thickly sown than he supposes, but what there really is in almost every town is a group of representatives of middle-class virtue. And the fruits by which he knows his men
oers of English race, with their industry and religion, are the salt of the earth. The cities you have built, exclaims Mr. Bright, the railroads you have made, the manufactures you have produced, the cargoes which freight the ships of the greatest mtheir religion, their own specially invented and indomitably maintained form of religion. Let a man consider, exclaims Mr. Bright again, how much of what there is free and good and great, and constantly growing in what is good, in this country, is oigious, and unshakable Nonconformists in all the towns, small and great, of England, whose praise is here celebrated by Mr. Bright. But he has an even more splendid tribute of praise for their brethren of the very same stock, and sort, and virtue, in America also. The great scale of things in America powerfully impresses Mr. Bright's imagination always; he loves to count the prodigious number of acres of land there, the prodigious number of bushels of wheat raised. The voluntary principle, th
mans had now made the people of the United States as much German as English, has not yet prevailed with me. I adhere to my old persuasion, the Americans of the United States are English people on the other side of the Atlantic. I learned it from Burke. But from Burke I learned, too, with what immense consequences and effects this simple matter — the settlement of a branch of the English people on the other side of the Atlantic — was, from the time of their constitution as an independent powerBurke I learned, too, with what immense consequences and effects this simple matter — the settlement of a branch of the English people on the other side of the Atlantic — was, from the time of their constitution as an independent power, certainly and inevitably charged. Let me quote his own impressive and profound words on the acknowledgment of American independence, in 1782:-- A great revolution has happened — a revolution made, not by chopping and changing of power in any of the existing states, but by the appearance of a new state, of a new species, in a new part of the globe. It has made as great a change in all the relations, and balances, and gravitations of power, as the appearance of a new planet would in the
Frederick Cavendish (search for this): chapter 2
dstone and Quinion, the bitter, serious Philistine and the rowdy Philistine, enter into American life and lower it? I will not pronounce on the matter myself; I have not the requisite knowledge. But all that we hear from America — hear from Americans themselves — points, so far as I can see, to a great presence and power of these middle-class misgrowths there as here. We have not succeeded in counteracting them here, and while our statesmen and leaders proceed as they do now, and Lord Frederick Cavendish congratulates the middle class on its energy and self-reliance in doing without public schools, and Lord Salisbury summons the middle class to a great and final stand on behalf of supernaturalism, we never shall succeed in counteracting them. We are told, however, of groups of children of light in every town of America, and an elegant social order prevailing there, which make one, at first, very envious. But soon one begins to think, I say, that surely there must be some mistake.
ve religion, which I believe still to be genuine, and an intense but narrow patriotism, are the only higher influences. Chalmers came from Illinois nine years ago. He is slightly intelligent, very opinionated, and wishes to be thought well-informed,s, but if I speak favorably of the climate or resources of any other country, he regards it as a slur on Colorado. Mrs. Chalmers looks like one of the English poor women of our childhood — lean, clean, toothless, and speaks, like some of them, inhroughout the West. I write this reluctantly, and after a total experience of nearly two years in the United States. Mrs. Chalmers is cleanly in her person and dress, and the food, though poor, is clean. Work, work, work, is their day and their liking being as her mother. Each morning, soon after seven, when I have swept the cabin, the family come in for worship. Chalmers wails a psalm to the most doleful of dismal tunes; they read a chapter round, and he prays. Sunday was a dreadful day.
1 2 3 4 5