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Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
day informed of the progress that was making, and of the reasons why the desired advance was delayed. These reasons are set forth in full in General McClellan's Report, and are substantiated by the testimony of the chief quartermasters Colonel Ingalls, and of other officers. The army was wholly deficient in cavalry, and a large part of our troops Were in want of shoes, clothing, blankets, knapsacks, and shelter-tents. It should be borne in mind that the presence of the Confederates in Maryland, and the imperative necessity of driving them out, had made excessive demands upon the strength and endurance of the Army of the Potomac. It was one of those cases in which nervous energy is called upon to do the work of muscular strength: for a while the claim is answered, but sooner or later the time of reaction must come. After the battle of Antietam a natural exhaustion followed the unnatural excitement which had been kept up for a fortnight previous. Had the army been furnished with
Chambersburg (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
o fall back at least upon Gordonsville so as to effect his junction with the rest of the army. In the event of a battle he felt confident of a brilliant victory. Late on the evening of. the 7th, the following orders were delivered to him by General Buckingham:-- Headquarters of the army, Washington, D. C., November 5, 1862. General:--On the receipt of the order of — the President sent herewith, you will immediately turn over your command to Major-General Burnside, and repair to Trenton, N. J., reporting on your arrival at that place by telegraph for further orders. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief. Major-General McClellan. General orders no. 182.War Department, Adjutant-General's office, Washington, November 5, 1862. By direction of the President of the United States, it is ordered that Major-General McClellan be relieved from the command of the Army of the Potomac, and that Major-General Burnside take the command of th
Gordonsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
n and spirits. I doubt whether during the whole period — that I had the honor to command the Army of the Potomac, it was in such excellent condition to light a great battle. Of the Confederate army, Longstreet's corps was in front at Culpepper, and the remaining portion was west of the Blue Ridge, near Chester's and Thornton's Gaps. General McClellan's plan was to separate the two wings of the enemy's forces, and either beat Longstreet separately, or force him to fall back at least upon Gordonsville so as to effect his junction with the rest of the army. In the event of a battle he felt confident of a brilliant victory. Late on the evening of. the 7th, the following orders were delivered to him by General Buckingham:-- Headquarters of the army, Washington, D. C., November 5, 1862. General:--On the receipt of the order of — the President sent herewith, you will immediately turn over your command to Major-General Burnside, and repair to Trenton, N. J., reporting on your arriv
Warrenton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ching to the South, on a line east of the Blue Ridge, which had been selected by General McClellan partly because it would secure him the largest accession of force and partly because the President had always been in favor of it. His purpose was to march his army to a point where it could derive its supplies from the Manassas Gap Railway, and where it could be held in hand ready for action or movement in any direction. On the 7th of November the several corps of the army were at or near Warrenton, and, as General McClellan says, in admirable condition and spirits. I doubt whether during the whole period — that I had the honor to command the Army of the Potomac, it was in such excellent condition to light a great battle. Of the Confederate army, Longstreet's corps was in front at Culpepper, and the remaining portion was west of the Blue Ridge, near Chester's and Thornton's Gaps. General McClellan's plan was to separate the two wings of the enemy's forces, and either beat Longstree
Chambersburg, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ginia side of the river, to learn the enemy's position and movements, had broken down the greater part of the cavalry-horses. A violent disease, attacking the hoof and tongue, soon after broke out among the animals, and at one time put nearly four thousand of them out of condition for service. To such an extent had the cavalry arm become reduced, that when the Confederate general Stuart made his raid into Pennsylvania, on the 11th of October, with two thousand men, penetrating as far as Chambersburg, General McClellan could only mount eight hundred men to follow him. Few civilians have any notion of the number of horses which are required by an army of a hundred thousand men. Indeed, we may go further, and say that few civilians have any distinct notion of what an army of a hundred thousand men is. We repeat the words mechanically, as we repeat the distances of the solar system, without any very definite impressions of numbers and mass in one case, or of space in the other. The foll
with some surprise by most of our readers, as well as with interest. In a letter dated October 14, 1862, the general-in-chief says,-- It is also reported to me that the number of animals with your army in the field is about thirty-one thousand. It is believed that your present proportion of cavalry and of animals is much larger than that of any other of our armies. What number of animals our other armies had, says General McClellan, I am not prepared to say; but military men in European armies have been of the opinion that an army, to be efficient, while carrying on active operations in the field, should have a cavalry force equal in numbers to from one-sixth to one-fourth of the infantry force. My cavalry did not amount to one-twentieth part of the army, and hence the necessity of giving every one of my cavalry-soldiers a serviceable horse. Cavalry may be said to constitute the antennoe of an army. It scouts all the roads in front, on the flanks, and in the rear of t
Sharpsburg (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
eral order was issued, which may unhesitatingly be pronounced admirable alike in substance and in form, animated by a high-toned patriotism, defining with precision the line where the duty of the citizen ends and the duty of the soldier begins, and giving to every candid mind an assurance that General McClellan himself would serve his country as faithfully and zealously in the future as he had done in the past:-- General order no. 163.Headquarters army of the Potomac, camp near Sharpsburg, Maryland, October 7, 1862. The attention of the officers and soldiers of the Army of the Potomac is called to General Order No. 139, War Department, publishing to the army the President's proclamation of September 22. A proclamation of such grave moment to the nation, officially communicated to the army, affords to the general commanding an opportunity of defining specifically to the officers and soldiers under his command, the relation borne by all persons in the military service of th
Colorado (Colorado, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
history, to guard the armies of the republic, and in so doing he will not be considered by any right-minded person as casting any reflection upon that loyalty and good conduct which has been so fully illustrated upon so many battle-fields. In carrying out all measures of public policy, this army will, of course, be guided by the same rules of mercy and Christianity that have ever controlled their conduct towards the defenceless. By order of Major-General McClellan. James A. Hardee, Lieut.-Col., Aide-de-Camp, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General. George B. Mcclellan, Major-General commanding. The seeming inactivity of the Army of the Potomac after the battle of Antietam was a disappointment to the public, and an annoyance to the Administration. It was expected that Lee's retreating forces would be instantly and vigorously pursued, and a new path to Richmond opened through his broken columns. The earnest desire of the Administration for a forward movement at length took the for
Chester Gap (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
hand ready for action or movement in any direction. On the 7th of November the several corps of the army were at or near Warrenton, and, as General McClellan says, in admirable condition and spirits. I doubt whether during the whole period — that I had the honor to command the Army of the Potomac, it was in such excellent condition to light a great battle. Of the Confederate army, Longstreet's corps was in front at Culpepper, and the remaining portion was west of the Blue Ridge, near Chester's and Thornton's Gaps. General McClellan's plan was to separate the two wings of the enemy's forces, and either beat Longstreet separately, or force him to fall back at least upon Gordonsville so as to effect his junction with the rest of the army. In the event of a battle he felt confident of a brilliant victory. Late on the evening of. the 7th, the following orders were delivered to him by General Buckingham:-- Headquarters of the army, Washington, D. C., November 5, 1862. Genera
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 11
d troops that could be dispensed with around Washington and other places, so that the old skeleton rIf you cross the river between the enemy and Washington, and cover the latter by your operations, yoad been duly made upon the War Department at Washington, but that in point of fact they had not beensupplies were put on board freight-trains at Washington to be forwarded to an army stationed at diffr against any officer, civil or military, at Washington. This distinctly appears by the following dmoving General McClellan, he addressed, from Washington, a circular letter to post-quartermasters, cf the Potomac, since the battles in front of Washington, to replace losses, (9254) nine thousand twojor-General H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief, Washington. On the same day General Halleck replieder 26, in which he says,-- Since you left Washington, I have advised and suggested in relation to2.War Department, Adjutant-General's office, Washington, November 5, 1862. By direction of the P[10 more...]
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