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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. Search the whole document.

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Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ing topic, Let the Abolitionists understand that they will be caught if they come among us, and they will take good care to stay away. The cry of the whole South should be death — instant death — to the abolitionist, wherever he is caught. --Augusta (Ga.) Chronicle. We can assure the Bostonians, one and all, who have embarked in the nefarious scheme of abolishing Slavery at the South, that lashes will hereafter be spared the backs of their emissaries. Let them send out their men to Louisiana; they will never return to tell their sufferings, but they shall expiate the crime of interfering with our domestic institutions, by being burned at the stake.--New Orleans True American. Abolition editors in Slave States will not dare to avow their opinions. It would be instant death to them.--Missouri Argus. And Mr. Preston, of South Carolina, who once delivered a speech at Columbia in reference to a proposed railroad, in which he despondingly drew a forcible contrast between
Newport (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
of the Clay and Webster school, until January, 1832, when he was brought under deep religious impressions, and the next month united with the Presbyterian Church. Relinquishing his political pursuits and prospects, he engaged in a course of study preparatory for the ministry, entering the Theological Seminary at Princeton, New Jersey, on the 24th of March. He received, next Spring, a license to preach from the second Presbytery of Philadelphia, and spent the Summer as an evangelist in Newport, R. I., and in New York. He left the last-named city in the autumn of that year, and returned to St. Louis, at the urgent invitation of a circle of fellow-Christians, who desired him to establish and edit a religious newspaper in that city — furnishing a capital of twelve hundred dollars for the purpose, and guaranteeing him, in writing, the entire control of the concern. The St. Louis Observer, weekly, was accordingly first issued on the 22d of November. It was of the Evangelical or Orthodo
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 11
ghtened country was not to be endured; and Mr. Thompson's eloquence, fervor, and thoroughness, increased the hostility excited by his presence, which, of itself, was held an ample excuse for mobs. Hie was finally induced to desist and return to England, from a conviction that the prejudice aroused by his interference in what was esteemed a domestic difference overbalanced the good effect of his lectures. The close of this year (1835) was signalized by the conversion of Gerrit Smith — hitherto slaves is a constitutional one, and therefore not to be called in question. I admit the premise, but deny the conclusion. Mr. Lovejoy proceeded to set forth that Robert Dale Owen and Frances Wright had recently landed on our shores from Great Britain, and had traversed our country, publicly propagating doctrines respecting Divorce which were generally regarded as utterly destructive to the institution of Marriage, yet they were nowhere mobbed nor assaulted for so doing. And yet, most sur
Clinton (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
journed to his home at Peterborough, Madison County, and there completed their organization. At the South, there was but one mode of dealing with Abolitionists — that described by Henry A. Wise as made up of Dupont's best [Gunpowder], and cold steel. Let your emissaries cross the Potomac, writes the Rev. T. S. Witherspoon from Alabama to The Emancipator, and I can promise you that your fate will be no less than Haman's. At a public meeting convened in the church in the town of Clinton, Mississippi, September 5, 1835, it was Resolved, That it is our decided opinion, that any individual who dares to circulate, with a view to effectuate the designs of the Abolitionists, any of the incendiary tracts or newspapers now in the course of transmission to this country, is justly worthy, in the sight of God and man, of immediate death: and we doubt not that such would be the punishment of any such offender, in any part of the State of Mississippi where he may be found. Says the Rev. W
Worcester (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ent success. A church was somewhat injured. Philadelphia followed on the 13th of August. Her riots lasted three nights, and the harmless and powerless blacks were mainly their victims. Forty-four houses (mostly small) were destroyed or seriously injured. Among them was a colored Presbyterian church. Several of the blacks were chased and assaulted, one of them being beaten to death, and another losing his life in attempting to swim the Schuylkill to escape his pursuers. At Worcester, Massachusetts, August 10, 1835, the Rev. Orange Scott, who was lecturing against Slavery, was assaulted, his notes torn up, and personal violence attempted. At Concord, New Hampshire, on the same day, a mob demolished an academy, because colored boys were admitted as pupils. At Canterbury, Connecticut, Miss Prudence Crandall having attempted, in 1833, to open a school for colored children, an act was passed by the Legislature forbidding any teaching within that State of colored youth from o
France (France) (search for this): chapter 11
resolution, strictly speaking, neither affirms nor denies anything in reference to the matter in hand. No man has a moral right to do anything improper. Whether, therefore, he has the moral right to discuss the question of Slavery, is a point with which human legislation or resolutions have nothing to do. The true issue to be decided is, whether he has the civil, the political right, to discuss it, or not. And this is a mere question of fact. In Russia, in Turkey, in Austria, nay, even in France, this right most certainly does not exist. But does it exist in Missouri? We decide this question by turning to the Constitution of the State. The sixteenth section, article thirteenth, of the Constitution of Missouri, reads as follows: That the free communication of thoughts and opinions is one of the invaluable rights of man, and that every person may freely speak, write, and print on any subject, being responsible for the abuse of that liberty. Here, then, I find my warrant for
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
as Resolved, That it is our decided opinion, that any individual who dares to circulate, with a view to effectuate the designs of the Abolitionists, any of the incendiary tracts or newspapers now in the course of transmission to this country, is justly worthy, in the sight of God and man, of immediate death: and we doubt not that such would be the punishment of any such offender, in any part of the State of Mississippi where he may be found. Says the Rev. William Plummer, D. D., of Richmond, Virginia, in response (July, 1835) to a call for a meeting of the clergy to take action on the exciting topic, Let the Abolitionists understand that they will be caught if they come among us, and they will take good care to stay away. The cry of the whole South should be death — instant death — to the abolitionist, wherever he is caught. --Augusta (Ga.) Chronicle. We can assure the Bostonians, one and all, who have embarked in the nefarious scheme of abolishing Slavery at the South, that
New Hampshire (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
9, 1802. His ancestors, partly English and partly Scotch, all of the industrious middle class, had been citizens of New Hampshire and of Maine for several generations. He was distinguished, from early youth, alike for diligence in labor and for zmittee appointed under the above resolution consisted of Messrs. Pinckney of South Carolina; Hamer of Ohio; Pierce of New Hampshire; Hardin of Kentucky; Jarvis of Maine; Owens of Georgia; Muhlenberg of Pennsylvania; Dromgoole of Virginia; and Turrilely, the Whig members from the Free States. At the next session, December 11, 1838. Mr. Charles G. Atherton, of New Hampshire, moved the following resolutions: Resolved, That this government is a government of limited powers; and that, by Proffit, a Tylerized Whig), who voted for this resolve, were as follows: Maine.--Virgil D. Parris, Albert Smith.--New Hampshire.--Charles G. Atherton, Edmund Burke, Ira A. Eastman, Tristram Shaw.--New York.--Nehemiah II. Earle, John Fine, Natha
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
the county of Washington, and including the cities of Washington and Georgetown — were ceded by Maryland in 1788, and now compose the entire District; so that Washington is commanded, within easy shelacceptance of Congress, become the seat of the Government of the United States. The cession by Maryland was without qualification. But Congress proceeded, soon after, to pass an act, apparently without much consideration or forecast, whereby the then existing laws of Maryland and Virginia were to continue in full force and effect over those portions of the Federal District ceded by them respectiensive mart for the prosecution of the domestic Slave-Trade. Some of the largest purchasers in Maryland and Virginia for the cotton and sugar region located themselves at this point, fitted up their , two years later, January 18, 1840. the House, on motion of William Cost Johnson (Whig), of Maryland, further Resolved, That upon the presentation of any memorial or petition, praying for the
Cincinnati (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
them that he had not come to Alton to establish an abolition, but a religious, journal; that he was not an Abolitionist, as they understood the term, but was an uncompromising enemy of Slavery, and so expected to live and die. He started for Cincinnati to procure new printing materials, was taken sick on the way, and, upon reaching Louisville, on his return, was impelled by increasing illness to stop. He remained there sick, in the house of a friend, for a week, and was still quite ill after the 24th of August, he issued an appeal to the friends of law and order for aid in reestablishing The Observer; and this appeal was promptly and generously responded to. Having obtained a sufficient amount in Alton and Quincy alone, he sent to Cincinnati to purchase new printing materials. Meantime, he issued an address, submitting To the friends of the Redeemer in Alton his resignation of the editorship of the paper, offering to hand over to them the subscription-list, now exceeding two thous
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