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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. Search the whole document.

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Las Cruces (New Mexico, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
regulars in New Mexico, one only deserted during this time of trial, and he, it is believed, did not join the enemy. Finally, the disloyal officers, headed by Loring and Crittenden, were glad to escape unattended, making their rendezvous at Fort Fillmore, twenty miles from the Texas line, no far from El Paso, where Maj. Lynde commanded. Here they renewed their intrigues and importunities, finding a large portion of the officers equally traitorous with themselves. But Maj. Lynde appeared to rty of Texans, who, in their turn, were beaten and chased away, with considerable loss, by about 100 regulars from the fort. The surviving Texans escaped to Mesilla; and Canby occupied the frontier posts so far down as Fort Staunton, leaving Fort Fillmore still in the hands of the Texans. Gen. Sibley, who had hoped to advance in the Autumn of 1861, was still at Fort Bliss, within the limits of Texas, on the 1st of January, 1862; but moved forward, a few days thereafter, with 2,300 men, many
Red River (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
regulars their loyalty and sufferings New Mexico repeals act legalizing Slavery Canby in command prepares to hold New Mexico Sibley brigade Fort Craig Sibley declines to attack battle of Valverde heroism and death of McRae fight at Apache Pass Rebels occupy Santa Fe they abandon New Mexico. The frontiers of Texas, Mexican and savage, were guarded, prior to the outbreak of Secession, by a line of forts or military posts stretching from Brownsville, opposite Matamoras, to the Red River. These forts were located at average distances of one hundred miles, and were severally held by detachments of from 50 to 150 of the regular army. San Antonio, 150 miles inland from Indianola, on Matagorda Bay, was the headquarters of the department, whence the most remote post--Fort Bliss, on the usual route thence to New Mexico--was distant 675 miles. The whole number of regulars distributed throughout Texas was 2,612, comprising nearly half the effective force of our little army. W
Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
they abandon New Mexico. The frontiers of Texas, Mexican and savage, were guarded, prior to thhole number of regulars distributed throughout Texas was 2,612, comprising nearly half the effectivs understood between them that his business in Texas was to betray this entire force, or so much ofarties, that our troops should simply evacuate Texas, marching to and embarking at the coast, wherehould proceed by water to any point outside of Texas; but these conditions, though made by a traitoall Federal soldiers and officers remaining in Texas. Maj. Sibley, in command at that port, had cha the several posts protecting the frontiers of Texas, being isolated and cut off from all communicaordinates, with intent to lead his regiment to Texas, and there turn it over to the service and supem — while, if they would but consent to go to Texas and take service with the Confederacy, they shezvous at Fort Fillmore, twenty miles from the Texas line, no far from El Paso, where Maj. Lynde co[10 more...]
Austin (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
iately and openly declared that the Union could not last 60 days, and warned officers, if they had pay due them, to draw it at once, as this would be the last. the entire force at and near San Antonio, with all their arms, munitions, and supplies, to three persons acting as Commissioners on behalf of the Committee of Public Safety, secretly appointed February 5, 1861. by the Convention which had just before assumed to take Texas out of the Union. Feb. 1. The Convention met this day at Austin, and at once passed an ordinance of Secession, subject to a vote of the people at an election to be held on the 23d just.; the ordinance, if approved, to take effect on the 2d of March. Texas was therefore still in the Union, even according to the logic of Secession. The betrayal was colored, not fairly cloaked, by a slim display of military force in behalf of the sovereign State of Texas, Col. Ben. McCulloch, an original and ardent Secessionist, having undertaken and fulfilled the duty of r
Socorro, N. Mex. (New Mexico, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
t they might now safely leave Canby to his meditations, and push on up the river into the heart of the Territory. They did so, as they anticipated, without further opposition from the force they had so signally beaten. Leaving their wounded at Socorro, 30 miles on the way, they advanced to Albuquerque, 50 miles further, which fell without resistance, and where their scanty stock of provisions was considerably replenished. At Cubero, 60 miles westward, they obtained more provisions and some a cannon by hand up and down the sides of most rugged mountains, he was ten days in making his way to a point on the river below, where supplies had been ordered to meet him, leaving his sick and wounded in hospitals at Santa Fe, Albuquerque, and Socorro, to fare as they might. He naively reports that sufficient funds in Confederate paper was provided them to meet every want, if it be negotiated; and honors the brothers Raphael and Manuel Armijo--wealthy native merchants — who, on his arrival a
Galveston (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
authority to offer increased rank and pay to all who would take service with the Rebels. His mission was a confessed failure. A few of the higher officers had participated in Twiggs's treason; but no more of these, and no private soldiers, could be cajoled or bribed into deserting the flag of their country. Col. Waite was still at San Antonio, when news reached Indianola April 17, 1861. of the reduction April 13. of Fort Sumter; and Col. Van Dorn, with three armed steamers from Galveston, arrived with instructions from Montgomery to capture and hold as prisoners of war all Federal soldiers and officers remaining in Texas. Maj. Sibley, in command at that port, had chartered two small schooners and embarked thereon a part of his force, when he was compelled to surrender again unconditionally. Col. Waite was in like manner captured at San Antonio, by order of Maj. Macklin, late an officer in our service, under Twiggs; Capt. Wilcox, who made the arrest, answering Waite's prot
Pala (New Mexico, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
e of Valverde heroism and death of McRae fight at Apache Pass Rebels occupy Santa Fe they abandon New Mexico. The frontiers of Texas, Mexican and savage, were lly accepted a furlough, suggested by Loring, and quickly repaired under it to Santa Fe, the Headquarters of the department, making a revelation of Crittenden's treaces encountered, March 24. at Cañon Glorietta, or Apache Pass, 15 miles from Santa Fe, near Fort Union, a new Federal force of 1,300, composed partly of regulars, b g before, Slough took 57 prisoners, with a loss of only 15. Sibley entered Santa Fe in triumph soon afterward, meeting no further resistance. He collected there ies had been ordered to meet him, leaving his sick and wounded in hospitals at Santa Fe, Albuquerque, and Socorro, to fare as they might. He naively reports that sufcross those desolate mountains, in the rear of the flying foe, but returned to Santa Fe, whence his order, of even date May 4, 1862. with Sibley's official report,
Matamoras (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
surrender of the regulars their loyalty and sufferings New Mexico repeals act legalizing Slavery Canby in command prepares to hold New Mexico Sibley brigade Fort Craig Sibley declines to attack battle of Valverde heroism and death of McRae fight at Apache Pass Rebels occupy Santa Fe they abandon New Mexico. The frontiers of Texas, Mexican and savage, were guarded, prior to the outbreak of Secession, by a line of forts or military posts stretching from Brownsville, opposite Matamoras, to the Red River. These forts were located at average distances of one hundred miles, and were severally held by detachments of from 50 to 150 of the regular army. San Antonio, 150 miles inland from Indianola, on Matagorda Bay, was the headquarters of the department, whence the most remote post--Fort Bliss, on the usual route thence to New Mexico--was distant 675 miles. The whole number of regulars distributed throughout Texas was 2,612, comprising nearly half the effective force of our
Hatch (New Mexico, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
within the limits of Texas, on the 1st of January, 1862; but moved forward, a few days thereafter, with 2,300 men, many of them trained to efficiency in the Mexican War and in successive expeditions against Apaches and other savages, wherein they had made the name of Texan Rangers a sound of terror to their foes. For Canby's regulars and American volunteers, they had some little respect — for his five or six thousand New Mexicans, none at all. Advancing confidently, but slowly, by way of Fort Thorn, he found Feb. 19, 1862. Canby in force at Fort Craig, which he confronted about the middle of February. A careful reconnoissance convinced him that it was madness, with his light field-guns, to undertake a siege; while his offer of battle in the open plain, just outside the range of the guns of the fort, was wisely declined. He would not retreat, and could not afford to remain, consuming his scanty supplies; while to pass the fort without a contest, leaving a superior force undemoral
El Paso (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ne man listened to the voice of the charmer, though Capt. Claiborn, at Fort Staunton, made several harangues to his company, intended to entice them into the Confederate service. Of the 1,200 regulars in New Mexico, one only deserted during this time of trial, and he, it is believed, did not join the enemy. Finally, the disloyal officers, headed by Loring and Crittenden, were glad to escape unattended, making their rendezvous at Fort Fillmore, twenty miles from the Texas line, no far from El Paso, where Maj. Lynde commanded. Here they renewed their intrigues and importunities, finding a large portion of the officers equally traitorous with themselves. But Maj. Lynde appeared to hold out against their solicitations. His forces, however, were so demoralized that, soon afterward, July 24, 1861. when he led 480 of them, out of 700, to the village of Mesilla, some twenty miles distant, he fell into an ambuscade of 200 badly armed Texans, and, after a skirmish, wherein his conduct c
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