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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. Search the whole document.

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d. Leaving a very small force in his works on the Fredericksburg heights, he pushed his main body — at least 50,000 strong — down the Gordonsville plank and lateral roads to the point, half-way to Chancellorsville, where the old turnpike intersects the plank road; and was Chancellorsville. Explanations: A. Positions held by Union troops previous to the movement. B. Positions held by Rebel troops previous to the movement. C. Position taken and held by Union troops, April 29. D. Small force of Rebels routed. April 30. E. Farthest advance made by Union forces, May 1. F. Line which Union forces retired to and intrenched, May 1. G. Jackson's attack on the 11th corps, May 2. H. Position which Union forces retired to and intrenched. May 8. I. Heights at Fredericksburg carried by 6th corps, May 3. J. Advanced position attained by 6th corps. K. Interior line intrenched previous to retiring of Union forces across U. S. ford, night of May 5th. L. Route p
Alexander Hamilton (search for this): chapter 16
The General commanding directs that you keep your whole command in position for a rapid movement down the old Richmond road, and you will send out at once a division, at least, to pass below Smithfield, to seize, if possible, the heights near Capt. Hamilton's, on this side of the Massaponax, taking care to keep it well supported and its line of retreat open. He has ordered another column, of a division or more, to be moved from Gen. Sumner's command up the plank road to its intersection of the telegraph road, where they will divide, with a view to seizing the heights on both of those roads. Holding these heights, with the heights near Capt. Hamilton's, will. I hope, compel the enemy to evacuate the whole ridge between these points. He makes these moves by columns. distant from each other, with a view of avoiding the possibility of a collision of our own forces, which might occur in a general movement during the fog. Two of Gen. Hooker's divisions are in your rear at the bridges, a
George B. McClellan (search for this): chapter 16
nd with unfeigned self-distrust, succeeded Nov. 8, 1862. to the command of the Army of the Potomac. The devotion to McClellan of its principal officers, and of many of their subordinates, was so ardent that any other commander must have had a postill more,in seeking to repeat that assault after the bloody, calamitous experience of the 13th--and the popularity of McClellan was immensely strengthened and widened by that disastrous repulse. Whatever his faults, Little Mac had ever been carefhe choice of a commander at any time during the month following our withdrawal from Fredericksburg, it is probable that McClellan would have had a decisive majority, and morally certain that Burnside's supporters would have proved a still more indubad, before their close, an army equal in numbers and efficiency to any ever seen on this continent, except that which Gen. McClellan commanded during the first three months of 1861. Its infantry was nearly, if not quite, 100,000 strong ; its artille
C. Position (search for this): chapter 16
ing for Hooker on his right; but he was not disconcerted. Leaving a very small force in his works on the Fredericksburg heights, he pushed his main body — at least 50,000 strong — down the Gordonsville plank and lateral roads to the point, half-way to Chancellorsville, where the old turnpike intersects the plank road; and was Chancellorsville. Explanations: A. Positions held by Union troops previous to the movement. B. Positions held by Rebel troops previous to the movement. C. Position taken and held by Union troops, April 29. D. Small force of Rebels routed. April 30. E. Farthest advance made by Union forces, May 1. F. Line which Union forces retired to and intrenched, May 1. G. Jackson's attack on the 11th corps, May 2. H. Position which Union forces retired to and intrenched. May 8. I. Heights at Fredericksburg carried by 6th corps, May 3. J. Advanced position attained by 6th corps. K. Interior line intrenched previous to retiring of Union f
ricksburg having developed no hostile force, Gen. Hooker ordered May 1, 9 A. M. an advance of Sykes's regulars (3d division, 5th corps) on that road, followed by part of the 2d corps; the 1st and t gradually separate. An advance of two or three miles toward Fredericksburg was meditated; but Sykes had hardly traversed a mile when he met the enemy coming on, in greater force, and a sharp conflict ensued, with mutual loss; the Rebels extending their line so as to outflank ours, while Sykes vainly attempted to connect with Slocum (12th corps) on his right. Gen. Warren, who was superintending Sykes's movement, returned and reported progress to Hooker, who ordered Sykes to fall back, which he did; bringing off all but a few of his wounded, and very cautiously followed by the enemy. ThuSykes to fall back, which he did; bringing off all but a few of his wounded, and very cautiously followed by the enemy. Thus the prestige of success, in the first collision of the struggle, was tamely conceded to the enemy; and the day closed with the woods and thickets in our front filled with Rebel sharp-shooters, and
ncellorsville. Sickles was in a critical position; but he had now his two divisions in hand, with his artillery — which had not been used in Birney's advance — massed in a cleared field; where Pleasanton, coming in from the front with a part of his force, met the rushing flood of fugitives from the right, and was told that a charge of cavalry was required to stop the enemy's advance. (He had at most 500 men, wherewith to arrest a charge of 25,000, led by Stonewall Jackson.) Turning to Maj. Keenan, 8th Pennsylvania, he said, You must charge into those woods with your regiment, and hold the Rebels until I can get some of these guns into position. You must do it, at whatever cost. I will. was the calm, smiling response of the patriot, who well understood that the order was his death-warrant. Ten minutes later, he was dead, and a good part of his regiment lay bleeding around him; but their charge had stayed the Rebel rush, and enabled Pleasanton to get his own battery of horse art
h was fractured, and considerable Confederate property destroyed. Davis then pushed down to within seven miles of Richmond, where he bivouacked that night, and set his face next morning toward Williamsburg on the Peninsula; but was stopped and turned aside by a Rebel force at Tunstall's Station, near White House; moving thence northward until he fell in with Kilpatrick near King and Queen Court House, and escaped with him to Gen. King's outpost at Gloucester Point. Stoneman, with Gregg and Buford, turned back May 5. from Yanceyville, recrossing the Rapidan at Raccoon ford, and the Rappahannock at Kelly's ford. May 8. Attempts were made to represent Stoneman's movement as successful, when it was in fact one of the most conspicuous failures of the war, though it might and should have been far otherwise. His force, if held well together, was sufficient to have severed for at least a week all connection by rail or telegraph between Lee and Richmond, riding right over any array
D. Small force of Rebels routed. April 30. E. Farthest advance made by Union forces, May 1. F. Line which Union forces retired to and intrenched, May 1. G. Jackson's attack on the 11th corps, May 2. H. Position which Union forces retired to and intrenched. May 8. I. Heights at Fredericksburg carried by 6th corps, May 3. J. Advanced position attained by 6th corps. K. Interior line intrenched previous to retiring of Union forces across U. S. ford, night of May 5th. L. Route pursued by Jackson's forces. here concentrated in time to watch the development of Hookers offensive strategy. A reconnoissance down the old pike for three miles toward Fredericksburg having developed no hostile force, Gen. Hooker ordered May 1, 9 A. M. an advance of Sykes's regulars (3d division, 5th corps) on that road, followed by part of the 2d corps; the 1st and 3d divisions of the 5th corps moving on a road farther north, in the direction of Banks's ford; the 11th, followed by
John S. Moseby (search for this): chapter 16
0 prisoners, with a loss of 14 men; a fourth, Feb. 26. by Gen. W. E. Jones, in the Valley, routing two regiments of Milroy's cavalry, and taking 200 prisoners, with a loss of 4 men only; while a more daring raid was made by Maj. White, of Jones's command, across the Potomac at Poolesville, taking 77 prisoners. Lee further reports that Capt. Randolph, of the Black Horse cavalry, by various raids into Fauquier county, captures over 200 prisoners and several hundred stand of arms; and that Lt. Moseby (whose name now makes its first appearance in a bulletin) has done much to harass the enemy; attacking him boldly on several occasions, and capturing many prisoners. One or two minor cavalry exploits, recited by Lee in General Order No. 29, read too much like romance to be embodied in sober history; yet such was the depression on our side in Virginia, such the elation and confidence on the other, such the very great advantage enjoyed by Rebel raiders in the readiness of tle White inhabit
Fitz Henry Warren (search for this): chapter 16
ed a mile when he met the enemy coming on, in greater force, and a sharp conflict ensued, with mutual loss; the Rebels extending their line so as to outflank ours, while Sykes vainly attempted to connect with Slocum (12th corps) on his right. Gen. Warren, who was superintending Sykes's movement, returned and reported progress to Hooker, who ordered Sykes to fall back, which he did; bringing off all but a few of his wounded, and very cautiously followed by the enemy. Thus the prestige of succem. How hazardous such attempts at concerted attack on a great army from opposite and distant points are, was not now to be first learned. The order found Sedgwick already across the river, but at a point two or three miles below the city. Gen. Warren, who was sent by Hooker, after the stampede of the 11th corps, to urge Sedgwick to evince all possible alacrity, found him, at 3 A. M. of the eventful Sunday, just getting his corps in motion, and explained to him Hooker's critical position an
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