hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
William T. Sherman 512 6 Browse Search
U. S. Grant 452 0 Browse Search
Joseph Hooker 431 1 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 404 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 400 0 Browse Search
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) 332 2 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 331 7 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant 326 8 Browse Search
Braxton Bragg 325 1 Browse Search
Ambrose E. Burnside 297 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. Search the whole document.

Found 1,298 total hits in 276 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...
Legareville (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
Edisto Island relinquished Gen. Hunter attacks Secessionville, and is repulsed Gen. Brannan threatens the Savannah railroad fight at Coosawhatchie destruction of the Nashville Dupont repulsed at Fort McAllister the Isaac Smith lost near Legareville iron-clad raid from Charleston the Mercedita and Keystone State disabled Beauregard and Ingraham proclaim the blockade of Charleston raised Dupont with his iron-clads attacks Fort Sumter, and is repulsed Col. Montgomery's raid up the Combwere but moderately damaged. Our vessels saved their ammunition by letting Fort McAllister alone thereafter. The National steamboat Isaac Smith, having been sent Jan. 30, 1863. up Stono river on a reconnoissance, went seven miles above Legareville without getting sight or sound of an enemy; but, when 6 miles on her way back, was opened upon in a bend by three masked batteries, which had not been observed before, and thereby speedily crippled and captured. The Com. McDonough went to her
North Edisto River (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
his own department, leaving his 12,000 men to serve as a reenforcement to Gen. Hunter; under whose auspices, in conjunction with Com. Dupont, the contemplated attack was now to be made. Halleck's sending of Foster into Hunter's department without notice to the latter has not been explained. Our preparations for this attack were made, so far as possible, at Hilton Head: the iron-clads, so fast as ready, slipping quietly, one by one, to their appointed rendezvous in the mouth of the North Edisto river, half way to Charleston harbor; where they were all finally assembled, April 3. awaiting the conditions of wind and tide deemed most favorable. A calm, clear night, April 5. following a full moon, proffered the awaited conjuncture; and Com. Dupont steamed April 6. in full force up to the harbor bar; shifting there his pennant from the gunboat James Adger to the stately, mailed Ironsides, in which he proposed to direct and share in the bombardment. By 9 A. M. next day, his fl
Secessionville (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
sweeps down the coast to St. Augustine Union movement at Jacksonville Pensacola and Jacksonville abandoned Edisto Island relinquished Gen. Hunter attacks Secessionville, and is repulsed Gen. Brannan threatens the Savannah railroad fight at Coosawhatchie destruction of the Nashville Dupont repulsed at Fort McAllister the on James island; and three more days elapsed ere Gen. Wright came up from Edisto with the residue of their forces. Such disjointed Gen. Hunter's attack on Secessionville. combinations in an intensely hostile region could have but one result; since the enemy were probably twice as strong, both in defenses and in men, as they would have been found had our advance been made with compact celerity. Secessionville is a petty village formed of the Summer residences of a few James island planters, on the east side of their island, two miles from the Stono, with salt water on three sides, and swamps narrowing to a mere ride the only practicable land approach
Land's End, South-carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
It is, however, three miles from the entrance of the harbor, and will not be able to molest our ships on their passage. Its chief value has been to aid blockade-runners; as it covers Maffit's channel (the passage through which the great majority of these craft run in) from the approach of our blockaders. At present, it will serve to oppose our landing troops at Breach inlet, should the attempt be made. Coming down along the shore of Sullivan's island, from Breach inlet, we next reach Fort Beauregard, a powerful sand battery, mounting very heavy guns, and situated on the turn of the island a little right of the Moultrie House hotel, from which it is separated only by five intervening sea-shore houses. Next, to the right of the channel, up and opposite Fort Sumter, is Fort Moultrie, which has been prodigiously strengthened by the Rebel engineers, both in its means of offense and of defense. Looking up the harbor and still to the right, the eye takes in the extensive line of works,
Skidaway Island (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
asserted — but that would neither be reported nor believed within the lines of the Confederates--so that it may be fairly concluded that by this time whatever Unionism there had been in Florida--that is, among the Whites — was pretty thoroughly eradicated by those who were sent thither as upholders of the National cause. On returning from his Florida expedition to Port Royal, March 27. Com. Dupont found that the enemy had, during his absence, abandoned their formidable batteries on Skiddaway and Green islands, conceding to us full possession of Warsaw and Ossibaw sounds; while Gen. Sherman had long since Feb. 11. taken quiet possession of Edisto island on our right, carrying our flag more than half way from Beaufort to Charleston. No inhabitants were left on Edisto but negroes; and the cotton which the departing Whites could not remove they had, for the most part, burned. The fall of Pulaski, soon afterward, gave us extension and security on the other flank; and now Gen.
Hill's Point (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
n this department for the year 1863. In North Carolina, little of moment occurred in 1863. Gen. D. H. Hill attempted to retake Newbern on the first anniversary March 14. of its recovery to the Union: attacking, with 20 guns, an unfinished earthwork north of the Neuse: but that work was firmly held by the 92d New York until reenforced; when its assailants drew off with little loss. Hill next demonstrated March 30. against Washington, N. C.: erecting batteries at Rodman's and Hill's Points, below the town, which commanded the navigation of Pamlico river and isolated the place. But Gen. Foster had meantime arrived: finding a garrison of 1,200 men, with two gun-boats and an armed transport under Com'r R. Renshaw; while the defenses were well placed and in good condition. Hill had here his corps, estimated by Poster at 20,000 strong, with 50 guns. But he paused three days before assaulting; which precious time was well improved by the garrison in strengthening and perfecti
, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
eral ridges commanding the town, with one on Rodman's Point, across the river; our small force posted there being easily expelled. As this position enabled the enemy to shell the town and our vessels lying before it, Foster attempted to recover it by an assault, but failed; and a second attempt, aided by the gunboat Ceres, which had just come up, running the Rebel batteries, was defeated by the untimely grounding of that vessel. Hill, having opened upon our works with 14 heavy guns, Fort Washington replied; and a mutual bombardment for 12 days was only interrupted by the failure of our ammunition. Meantime, a small fleet of gun-boats had arrived below the Rebel batteries commanding the river, with a relieving force of 3,000 men on transports, under Brig.-Gen. Henry Prince, whom Foster ordered to land and take the Hill's Point battery, so as to allow the boats to come up. Prince decided this impracticable, and refused to attempt it. Foster was now obliged to supply his batter
Wright River (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
imately forwarded or collected. Meantime, the 46th New York, Col. R. Rosa, was sent In Dec. to occupy Big Tybee, and a detachment directed quietly to clear out the Rebel obstructions in Wall's cut, an artificial channel connecting New and Wright rivers, north of Cockspur, and completing an inland water passage from Savannah to Charleston. After some sharp fighting and four nights' hard work, this was achieved; Jan. 14, 1862. and, after some farther delay, Venus point, on Jones island, north-west of the coveted fortress, was selected Jan. 28. as a point whereon to place a battery, barring all daylight access to the beleaguered fort from above. To this point, mortars, weighing 8 1/2 tuns each, were brought through New and Wright rivers (each of them a sluggish tide-course between rush-covered islets of semi-liquid mud); being patiently tugged across Jones island on a movable causeway of planks laid on poles — those behind tile moving gun being taken up and placed in its fro
Beach Inlet (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
creeks and rivers wind. With Sullivan's island on our right, we run the eye up to its upper or north end, formed by Breach inlet. Guarding this point, is Breach inlet battery — a powerful sand-work, having a circular, dome-like, bomb-proof magaziBreach inlet battery — a powerful sand-work, having a circular, dome-like, bomb-proof magazine in its center. It is, however, three miles from the entrance of the harbor, and will not be able to molest our ships on their passage. Its chief value has been to aid blockade-runners; as it covers Maffit's channel (the passage through which theof these craft run in) from the approach of our blockaders. At present, it will serve to oppose our landing troops at Breach inlet, should the attempt be made. Coming down along the shore of Sullivan's island, from Breach inlet, we next reach Fort Breach inlet, we next reach Fort Beauregard, a powerful sand battery, mounting very heavy guns, and situated on the turn of the island a little right of the Moultrie House hotel, from which it is separated only by five intervening sea-shore houses. Next, to the right of the channel
Keokuk, Iowa (Iowa, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
ns that had ever yet tested the defensive resources of naval warfare. The iron-clads thus pitted against the tremendous ordnance of Fort Sumter and her satellites were the following: 1. Weehawken, Capt. John Rodgers; 2. Passaic, Capt. Percival Drayton; 3. Montauk, Com'r John L. Worden; 4. Patapsco, Com'r Daniel Ammen; 5. New Ironsides, Com'r Thos. Turner; 6. Catskill, Com'r Geo. W. Rodgers; 7. Nantucket, Com'r Donald M. Fairfax; 8. Nahant, Com'r John Downes; 9. Keokuk, Lt.-Com'r Alex. C. Rhind; with the gunboats Canandaigua, Unadilla, Housatonic, Wissahickon, and Huron in reserve, below the bar, ready to support the iron-clads should they attack the batteries on Morris island. The day was bright, bland, and warm — like one of the finest of the later days of a Northern May — the air of midday flashing with the wings of countless butterflies — though a slight haze or smoke in the morning so obscured remoter objects that the landmarks relied on to give be<
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...