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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. Search the whole document.

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Seabrook Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
an extensive line (250 miles) to picket, that 11,000 was the very utmost that he could venture to concentrate for any offensive purpose that might not be consummated within a few days at farthest. And he had, apart from the navy, 96 heavy guns (all serviceable but 12 13-inch mortars, which proved too large, and were left unused), with an abundance of munitions, engineering tools, &c. He found our forces in quiet possession of nearly or quite all the Sea islands west of the Stono, with Seabrook and Folly islands, east of that inlet. Our pickets still — as on the day of Dupont's attack — confronted those of the enemy across Lighthouse inlet, which separates these from Morris island. Gillmore's plan of operations — carefully matured before he entered upon his command — contemplated a descent by surprise on the south end of Morris island — well known to be strongly fortified and held-which, being taken, was to be firmly held as a base for operations against Fort Wagner, a stro
Kanawha (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
enginery ultimately forwarded or collected. Meantime, the 46th New York, Col. R. Rosa, was sent In Dec. to occupy Big Tybee, and a detachment directed quietly to clear out the Rebel obstructions in Wall's cut, an artificial channel connecting New and Wright rivers, north of Cockspur, and completing an inland water passage from Savannah to Charleston. After some sharp fighting and four nights' hard work, this was achieved; Jan. 14, 1862. and, after some farther delay, Venus point, on Jones island, north-west of the coveted fortress, was selected Jan. 28. as a point whereon to place a battery, barring all daylight access to the beleaguered fort from above. To this point, mortars, weighing 8 1/2 tuns each, were brought through New and Wright rivers (each of them a sluggish tide-course between rush-covered islets of semi-liquid mud); being patiently tugged across Jones island on a movable causeway of planks laid on poles — those behind tile moving gun being taken up and plac
Darien, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
rivers find their way to the ocean, was calculated to deepen and improve those remaining. Com. Dupont, in his steam frigate Wabash, with twenty other armed vessels, and six unarmed transports, conveying a brigade of volunteers, Gen. Wright, and a battalion of marines, Maj. Reynolds, setting out from Port Royal Feb. 28. swept down the coast to St. Andrew's and Cumberland sounds; taking unresisted possession of Fort Clinch on Amelia island, Fernandina, St. Mary's, Brunswick, March 9. Darien, March 13. St. Simon's island, Jacksonville, March 12. and St. Augustine; where Fort St. Mark--another of the old Federal coast defenses — was repossessed without bloodshed--Gen. Trapier, Rebel commander on this coast, having no force adequate to resisting such an expedition--Florida having ere this contributed nearly 10,000 men, out of a total white population of 80,000, to the Confederate armies fighting in other States. A considerable Union feeling was evinced at various points;
Nahant (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
ouraged by this cheap success, now resolved to give the fort itself a trial: to which end, the iron-clads Passaic, Capt. Drayton, Patapsco, Montauk, Ericsson, and Nahant, with three mortar-schooners, steamed March 3. up the Ogeechee, and opened fire: the Passaic leading, the rest following, and all firing at the fort at the shoto approach nearer than 1,200 yards; the other iron-clads being, of course, farther off, and the schooners farther still. Thus placed, the Passaic, Patapsco, and Nahant, opened fire; and it was kept up, with one or two intervals, from 8 1/2 A. M. to 4 P. M., and by the mortar-schooners every 15 minutes thenceforth till next morni 4. Patapsco, Com'r Daniel Ammen; 5. New Ironsides, Com'r Thos. Turner; 6. Catskill, Com'r Geo. W. Rodgers; 7. Nantucket, Com'r Donald M. Fairfax; 8. Nahant, Com'r John Downes; 9. Keokuk, Lt.-Com'r Alex. C. Rhind; with the gunboats Canandaigua, Unadilla, Housatonic, Wissahickon, and Huron in reserve, below the bar,
Fort McAllister (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
ttacks Secessionville, and is repulsed Gen. Brannan threatens the Savannah railroad fight at Coosawhatchie destruction of the Nashville Dupont repulsed at Fort McAllister the Isaac Smith lost near Legareville iron-clad raid from Charleston the Mercedita and Keystone State disabled Beauregard and Ingraham proclaim the blockavery near it, falls into Ossabaw sound, some 10 miles S. W. of Savannah. A few miles up the Ogeechee, the Rebels had constructed a strong earthwork known as Fort McAllister, in a bend of the stream, enabling it to rake any vessel which should attempt to pass it. A row of heavy piles across the channel, with some torpedoes in the ence in the saving of Confederate life.] even tile embrasures of the Rebel battery were but moderately damaged. Our vessels saved their ammunition by letting Fort McAllister alone thereafter. The National steamboat Isaac Smith, having been sent Jan. 30, 1863. up Stono river on a reconnoissance, went seven miles above Legare
Florida (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
Xx. The Carolinas, Georgia, Florida--1862-‘63. Siege and capture of Fort Pulaski by Gillmore sinking of Stone fleet in Charleston Harbor Com. Dupont sweeps down the coast to St. Augustiapier, Rebel commander on this coast, having no force adequate to resisting such an expedition--Florida having ere this contributed nearly 10,000 men, out of a total white population of 80,000, to thcks by accompanying our departing forces. That settled, for years, the fortunes of Unionism in Florida. And, though Com. Dupont, on returning with his fleet to Port Royal, left a small force at eacd. Thus closed unhappily an enterprise which was probably adequate to the complete recovery of Florida, though not able to hold it against the whole power of the Confederacy. Pensacola was evacuarates--so that it may be fairly concluded that by this time whatever Unionism there had been in Florida--that is, among the Whites — was pretty thoroughly eradicated by those who were sent thither as
Fernandina, Fla. (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
through which the waters of Ashley and Cooper rivers find their way to the ocean, was calculated to deepen and improve those remaining. Com. Dupont, in his steam frigate Wabash, with twenty other armed vessels, and six unarmed transports, conveying a brigade of volunteers, Gen. Wright, and a battalion of marines, Maj. Reynolds, setting out from Port Royal Feb. 28. swept down the coast to St. Andrew's and Cumberland sounds; taking unresisted possession of Fort Clinch on Amelia island, Fernandina, St. Mary's, Brunswick, March 9. Darien, March 13. St. Simon's island, Jacksonville, March 12. and St. Augustine; where Fort St. Mark--another of the old Federal coast defenses — was repossessed without bloodshed--Gen. Trapier, Rebel commander on this coast, having no force adequate to resisting such an expedition--Florida having ere this contributed nearly 10,000 men, out of a total white population of 80,000, to the Confederate armies fighting in other States. A considerable
Amelia Island (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
unarmed transports, conveying a brigade of volunteers, Gen. Wright, and a battalion of marines, Maj. Reynolds, setting out from Port Royal Feb. 28. swept down the coast to St. Andrew's and Cumberland sounds; taking unresisted possession of Fort Clinch on Amelia island, Fernandina, St. Mary's, Brunswick, March 9. Darien, March 13. St. Simon's island, Jacksonville, March 12. and St. Augustine; where Fort St. Mark--another of the old Federal coast defenses — was repossessed without blAmelia island, Fernandina, St. Mary's, Brunswick, March 9. Darien, March 13. St. Simon's island, Jacksonville, March 12. and St. Augustine; where Fort St. Mark--another of the old Federal coast defenses — was repossessed without bloodshed--Gen. Trapier, Rebel commander on this coast, having no force adequate to resisting such an expedition--Florida having ere this contributed nearly 10,000 men, out of a total white population of 80,000, to the Confederate armies fighting in other States. A considerable Union feeling was evinced at various points; a Union meeting held in Jacksonville (the most populous town in the State), and a Convention called to assemble there on the 10th of April to organize a Union State Governmen
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
the enemy of little practical account. And, beside, every offensive movement on their part must be made under the enfilading fire of our gun-boats; which constantly aided to shield our working parties from a fusillade that, destructive at best, would else have been insupportable. General Terry, on James island, was attacked at daybreak July 16. by a more numerous Rebel force of Georgians, just arrived from Virginia, who, expecting to surprise him, advanced rapidly, driving in the 54th Mass., then on picket duty; but they found Terry wide awake and ready, with the gunboats Pawnee, Huron, Marblehead, John Adams, and Mayflower at hand; by whose aid they were easily driven off, with a loss of some 200. Ours was 100. Terry proceeded to Morris island forthwith, to share in the meditated grand assault on Fort Wagner. The preliminary bombardment was to have opened at daylight; July 18. but a terrible storm had so delayed our preparations and dampened our powder that it did not
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
rsairs. Very soon after our recovery See Vol I., p. 605. of Port Royal and the adjacent sea-islands, Gen. T. W. Sherman directed Nov ight, and a battalion of marines, Maj. Reynolds, setting out from Port Royal Feb. 28. swept down the coast to St. Andrew's and Cumberland sFlorida. And, though Com. Dupont, on returning with his fleet to Port Royal, left a small force at each of the more defensible places he had Arnold, commanding Fort Pickens. Another naval expedition from Port Royal, Sept. 13. under Capt. Steedman, consisting of the gunboats Pae National cause. On returning from his Florida expedition to Port Royal, March 27. Com. Dupont found that the enemy had, during his abisen, they floated; and Barton returned with them, unmolested, to Port Royal. Our loss in this expedition was not far from 300. Walker repPowhatan and the Canandaigua, our two largest men of war, were at Port Royal, coaling; and, first nearing the Mercedita, Capt. Stellwagen, the
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