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Browsing named entities in a specific section of William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington. Search the whole document.

Found 355 total hits in 193 results.

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Tracy City (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
of speech. Twenty-first Illinois:--Colonel U. S. Grant; enlisted June 15, 1861; promoted Brigadier dier General, Aug. 7, 1861. Twenty-fifth Wisconsin, Company G:--´╝łGeo. W. Ide; died June 2, 1864, at Dallas, Ga., of sunstroke. First Kentucky Cavalry (Union), Company H:--Geo. W. Eller; killed Feb. 10, 1863, in a personal difficulty, A frequent item in the Tennessee and Kentucky rolls. in Wayne Co., Ky. Fifth Tennessee Cavalry (Union), Company F:--J. N. Gilliam; killed near Tracy City, Tenn., by guerrillas, A frequent item in the Tennessee and kentucky rolls. Aug. 4, 1864. Eighteenth Wisconsin, Company B:--Redmond McGuire; killed April 10, 1862, in prison, by rebel guard, Tuscaloosa, Ala. Thirty-eighth Ohio, Company K:--Jacob Thomas; killed Nov. 17, 1861, by the falling of a tree, at Wild Cat, Ky. One Hundred and Sixty-second New York, Company E:--John Murphy; shot while endeavoring to escape the guard at New Orleans, April 5, 1863. Eighth New York, Company
Somerset, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
times; died August 10, 1864 at Macon, Ga., of wounds. First New Jersey, Company A:---Jordan Silvers; killed on picket near Alexandria, Va., October 15, 1861. Fifth New Hampshire, Company G:--John Velon; shot for desertion near Petersburg, Va., October 28, 1864. Fifth Wisconsin, Company A:--Francis Lee; first man of regiment to reach enemy's works in assault on Petersburg, April 2, 1865. One Hundred and Twelfth Illinois, Company A:--Lorenzo Brown; kicked to death by a mule at Somerset, Ky., April 23, 1864. Sixty-fifth Ohio, Company H:--Corporal Adam Glasgow; discharged May 27, 1865, on surgeon's certificate; both feet frozen while en route from Wilmington, N. C., to Annapolis, Md.; an exchanged prisoner of war. Twenty-first Massachusetts, Company E: From rolls attached to regimental history.--Sergeant Thomas Plunkett; lost both arms while carrying regimental U. S. flag at Fredericksburg; discharged May 9, 1863. Twenty-first Massachusetts, Company C: From rolls a
Malvern Hill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ling scenes. Killed, July 3, 1863, at Gettysburg; and one thinks of Pickett's charge, or other incidents of that historic field. Killed, May 3, 1863, at Marye's Heights; and the compiler lays down his pencil to dream again of that fierce charge which swept upward over the sloping fields of Fredericksburg. Wounded and missing, May 6, 1864, at the Wilderness, suggests a nameless grave marked, if at all, by a Government headstone bearing the short, sad epitaph, Unknown. Killed at Malvern Hill, July 11 1862; and there rises a picture of an artilleryman lying dead at the wheels of his gun. Died of gunshot wound before Atlanta, August 20, 1864, tells of some lad who fills a grave long miles away from the village church-yard of his Northern home. Wounded at Antietam, September 17, 1862, and died on the amputating table, brings up the dire vision of the field-hospital, that ghastly sequel of every battle. Killed at Appomattox, April 9, 1865; and one sees the dead cavalryma
Wisconsin (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
where it was filed il the office of the state adjutant-general. These regimental rolls and records may be found carefully preserved among the archives of each state. and it is evident that such of them as were properly made will show clearly and accurately the mortuary losses of the regiments to which they pertain. The states of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia, Kentucky, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa and Kansas have printed and published the muster-out-rolls of the regiments which they respectively furnished to the Union Armies. The name of each and every man who served in these regiments is preserved in print; the record of his patriotism is transmitted, and in time becomes the proudest heir-loom of his family. Some of these publications are, necessarily, voluminous. The rolls of the Illinois troops fill eight octavos; the Indiana rolls require eight volumes of s
Frederick (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
io. At the time of enlistment he was 24 years old, and 40 inches in height. Colonel F. W. Butterfield, his commanding officer, vouches for the correctness of this record. He also assures us that he knew the man well; and, that there was no soldier in his command who could endure a greater amount of fatigue and exposure.--Dr. B. A. Gould. By selecting from the whole Army, there could have been formed regiments and brigades of tall men which would have surpassed the famous giant-guards of Frederick the Great. But tall men proved to be poor material for a long, toilsome campaign. When, after a hard, forced march, the captain looked over his company at nightfall to see how many men he had with him, the ponies who trudged along at the tail of the company were generally all there; it was the head end of the company that was thinned out. The records of the weights of the soldiers are incomplete; but, such as they are, they indicate that the average weight was 143 1/2 pounds. The
Andersonville, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
Vermont, Company B:--Lt. Edward B. Parker; died a prisoner at Columbia, S. C., Oct. 13, 1864, from injuries received from bloodhounds. Fourth New Jersey, Company C:--Geo. W. Hindley; died in a fit at Alexandria, Va., Oct. 7, 1861. Seventh Wisconsin, Company A:--Horace A. Ellis; awarded medal of honor for capture of flag of the Sixteenth Mississippi at Weldon R. R., Aug. 21, 1864. Ninth New Jersey, Company G:--Christian Huber; shot by rebel sentinel while stepping on dead-line at Andersonville, Aug. 5, 1864. First Indiana Cavalry, Company L:--Andress (Greene; drafted for nine months; killed in action. Twenty-second Indiana, Company C:--Private Eli P. Wells; promoted Chaplain. Fifth New York Cavalry, Company H:--Lt. J. A. Benedict; died from amputation of right arm resulting from the bite of a man on thumb, Dec. 11, 1861. From records attached to regimental history. Fifth New York Cavalry, Company G:--John Evans; March 7, 1865, had a ball pass through a pack of
Brandy Station (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
at random, may give an idea of what one runs across in examining these old records. They are copied from the muster-out rolls, manuscript and printed, while some are from the rolls appended to regimental histories. If at times the sad and the ridiculous are too closely intermingled, it is because the story runs that way, reflecting truly the peculiarly intermingled scenes of army life. Extracts from: muster-out-rolls Tenth New York Cavalry, Company D:--Lt. Wm. J. Rabb; killed at Brandy Station, by a sabre-thrust through the body while lying under his horse; he would not surrender. Thirty-seventh Wisconsin, Company C:--Sergeant William H. Green; recommended for promotion for gallantry in action, Petersburg, Va., June 17, 1864, where he was wounded in both legs, after receiving which he crawled from the field, dragging his colors with his teeth; died July 17, 1864, of wounds. Twenty-fifth Wisconsin, Company B:--Capt. W. H. Bennett; wounded and prisoner, July 22, 1864; leg
Iowa (Iowa, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ry losses of the regiments to which they pertain. The states of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia, Kentucky, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa and Kansas have printed and published the muster-out-rolls of the regiments which they respectively furnished to the Union Armies. The name of each and every man who served in these regiments is preserved in print; the record of his patriotism is175,000; Ireland, 150,000; England, 50,000; British America, 50,000; other countries, 75,000. The average height of the American soldiers, as shown by the records of the recruiting officers, was 5 feet 8 1/4 inches. The men from Maine, Indiana, Iowa, Missouri and Kentucky, were slightly above this figure. The West Virginians averaged 5 feet 9 inches in height. The general average would have been greater had it not included the measurements of recruits from 17 to 20 years of age, who evident
Dallas, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ons), Company C:--Sergeant John Gossett; killed at Utoy Creek while planting his colors on the enemy's works. Nineteenth Wisconsin:--Chaplain J. H. Nichols; died Jan., 1863, in an insane asylum. Fifty-second Indiana, Company B:--Timothy Westport; discharged April 27, 1863, for loss of speech. Twenty-first Illinois:--Colonel U. S. Grant; enlisted June 15, 1861; promoted Brigadier dier General, Aug. 7, 1861. Twenty-fifth Wisconsin, Company G:--´╝łGeo. W. Ide; died June 2, 1864, at Dallas, Ga., of sunstroke. First Kentucky Cavalry (Union), Company H:--Geo. W. Eller; killed Feb. 10, 1863, in a personal difficulty, A frequent item in the Tennessee and Kentucky rolls. in Wayne Co., Ky. Fifth Tennessee Cavalry (Union), Company F:--J. N. Gilliam; killed near Tracy City, Tenn., by guerrillas, A frequent item in the Tennessee and kentucky rolls. Aug. 4, 1864. Eighteenth Wisconsin, Company B:--Redmond McGuire; killed April 10, 1862, in prison, by rebel guard, Tuscaloosa,
Youngs Point (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
d of his Northern home. Wounded at Antietam, September 17, 1862, and died on the amputating table, brings up the dire vision of the field-hospital, that ghastly sequel of every battle. Killed at Appomattox, April 9, 1865; and one sees the dead cavalryman, who, falling in that closing battle of the war, died with home and victory in sight. Died of sunstroke, recalls the long march, the heavy load, the dust, the heat, and a senseless form lying at the roadside. Died of fever at Young's Point, Miss., reminds one of the campaigns in the bayous and poisonous swamps, with the men falling in scores before a foe more deadly and remorseless than the bullet. Executed on sentence of G. C. M.; shot to death by musketry; and one recalls the incidents of the most trying of all scenes, a military execution. Killed on picket, September 15, 1863, on the Rappahannock, suggests the star-lit river, the lonely vidette, an echoing shot, and a man dying alone in the darkness. And so it
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