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in highway. When it comes to sleeping, I rejoice that I am a civilian, for I am much better cared for to-night than the commander of this, the largest force ever marshalled under one general on this continent. There are two hotels in this place, both evidently feeble at their best estate, and just now, after a prolonged visit of rapacious and boisterous rebels, in a state of suspended animation. Capt. Rawlings, of the New Hampshire Regiment, with that versatility which enables a New Englander to turn from commanding armies to keeping a hotel with marvellous facility, has succeeded in infusing into the mind of the invalid widow who keeps one of them that the national troops have not come to sweep her and hers from the face of the earth. She has accordingly provided me with a bed, which, if not luxurious, is, to my untutored mind, decidedly preferable to one on the ground, even under the brilliant sky and softly superb moon of this July night. H. J. R. --N. Y. Times, July 20.
ve over different routes towards Fairfax Court House, and occupy such positions as to leave the rebels no other alternative than retreat or surrender. A similar plan of operations will be followed in regard to the rebel forces at the Junction. July 17--5 A. M. To-day's march of the First division will be slow, as many obstructions will have to be removed from the road. It is almost certain that the troops will have to fight a portion of their way. The entire division is now forming. Athe moist fields, and show their gladness at the immediate prospect of an encounter with the rebels by continued cheering. The Ohio regiments seem particularly anxious to square up their Vienna account. --N. Y. Herald, July 18. Germantown, July 17--1 P. M. The second day's movements of the First division of the grand army, under General Tyler, from Vienna to this point, although more obstructed than yesterday's, have been entirely successful up to the time of writing. The column comme
e night they spent in the moist fields, and show their gladness at the immediate prospect of an encounter with the rebels by continued cheering. The Ohio regiments seem particularly anxious to square up their Vienna account. --N. Y. Herald, July 18. Germantown, July 17--1 P. M. The second day's movements of the First division of the grand army, under General Tyler, from Vienna to this point, although more obstructed than yesterday's, have been entirely successful up to the time of writrt House. All four divisions will move on towards the Junction tomorrow. The skulking of the enemy greatly disappointed our men. If he stands at all, Manassas Junction will, doubtlessly, be the scene of a decisive battle. --N. Y. Herald, July 18. New York times narrative. Fairfax Court Chouse, Va., Wednesday night, July 17, 1861. The General decided not to move forward any further to-night, mainly because the troops had been so fatigued by their day's march as to render any f
n highway. When it comes to sleeping, I rejoice that I am a civilian, for I am much better cared for to-night than the commander of this, the largest force ever marshalled under one general on this continent. There are two hotels in this place, both evidently feeble at their best estate, and just now, after a prolonged visit of rapacious and boisterous rebels, in a state of suspended animation. Capt. Rawlings, of the New Hampshire Regiment, with that versatility which enables a New Englander to turn from commanding armies to keeping a hotel with marvellous facility, has succeeded in infusing into the mind of the invalid widow who keeps one of them that the national troops have not come to sweep her and hers from the face of the earth. She has accordingly provided me with a bed, which, if not luxurious, is, to my untutored mind, decidedly preferable to one on the ground, even under the brilliant sky and softly superb moon of this July night. H. J. R. --N. Y. Times, July 20.
July 8th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 106
Doc. 97.-the advance into Virginia. July 16, 1861. General McDowell's army. the subjoined General Order gives the organization of the Staff and of the several divisions of the army under Brigadier-General McDowell, now advancing into Virginia from the lines opposite Washington. General orders no. 13. Headquarters, Department N. E. Virginia, Washington, July 8, 1861. Until otherwise ordered, the following will be the organization of the troops in this Department: staff of the Department Commander. Adjutant--General's Department.--Captain James B. Fry, Assistant Adjutant-General. Aides-de-Camp.--First-Lieutenant H. W. Kingsbury, 5th Artillery; Major Clarence S. Brown, N. Y. State Militia; Major James S. Wordsworth, N. Y. State Militia. Acting Inspector-General.--Major W. H. Wood, 17th Infantry. Engineers.--Major J. G. Barnard; First-Lieutenant F. E. Prime. Topographical Engineers.--Captain A. W. Whipple; First-Lieutenant Henry L. Abbott; Second-Lieutenant H
July 16th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 106
Doc. 97.-the advance into Virginia. July 16, 1861. General McDowell's army. the subjoined General Order gives the organization of the Staff and of the several divisions of the army under Brigadier-General McDowell, now advancing into Virginia from the lines opposite Washington. General orders no. 13. Headquarters, Depae, on Wednesday morning; and I send you the following details, devoid of all attempts at sensation news, directly from the seat of war. The evening of Tuesday, July 16th, 1861, will long be remembered by all who were in this region on that day, as one of the finest in the whole season — warm, but clear and delightfully pleasant, and kept with it until it halted within the breastworks vacated only an hour or two before by the rebels. Operations of the right wing. Vienna, Va., July 16, 1861. The long-expected order to move forward was telegraphed from Gen. McDowell's headquarters, at Arlington Heights, to all the division and brigade commanders
July 17th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 106
unholy rebellion is effectually broken. They meet the issue manfully, cheer fully, boldly, and their watchwords now are-- God and the Right I Richmond, and Victory! Yours, &c., G. P. R. New York Herald narratives. Washington, July 17, 1861. The advance of the whole corps d'armee constituting the column under the command of Brigadier-General McDowell has thus far proved a triumphant march. All that was expected or hoped to be accomplished to-day was done, and almost without of the enemy greatly disappointed our men. If he stands at all, Manassas Junction will, doubtlessly, be the scene of a decisive battle. --N. Y. Herald, July 18. New York times narrative. Fairfax Court Chouse, Va., Wednesday night, July 17, 1861. The General decided not to move forward any further to-night, mainly because the troops had been so fatigued by their day's march as to render any further movement unadvisable. They are encamped accordingly in this vicinity, a large port
July 18th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 106
iles, 2d Infantry, commanding. First Brigade.--Col. Blenker, New York Volunteers, commanding. 8th & 29th Regiments New York Volunteers; Garibaldi Guard; 24th Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers. Second Brigade.--Colonel Davies, New York Volunteers, commanding. 16th, 18th, 31st, & 32d Regiments New York Volunteers; Company G, 2d Artillery, (Light Battery.) By command of Brig.-Gen. McDowell. James B. Fry, Assistant Adjutant-General. Boston Transcript narrative. Washington, July 18, 1861. It was a glorious sight, and a rarely interesting privilege, to witness the moving of the advance of General McDowell's vast column of troops towards the land oa Dixie, on Wednesday morning; and I send you the following details, devoid of all attempts at sensation news, directly from the seat of war. The evening of Tuesday, July 16th, 1861, will long be remembered by all who were in this region on that day, as one of the finest in the whole season — warm, but clear and delightfull
Henry L. Abbott (search for this): chapter 106
in this Department: staff of the Department Commander. Adjutant--General's Department.--Captain James B. Fry, Assistant Adjutant-General. Aides-de-Camp.--First-Lieutenant H. W. Kingsbury, 5th Artillery; Major Clarence S. Brown, N. Y. State Militia; Major James S. Wordsworth, N. Y. State Militia. Acting Inspector-General.--Major W. H. Wood, 17th Infantry. Engineers.--Major J. G. Barnard; First-Lieutenant F. E. Prime. Topographical Engineers.--Captain A. W. Whipple; First-Lieutenant Henry L. Abbott; Second-Lieutenant Haldimand S. Putnam. Quartermaster's Department.--Captain O. H. Tillinghast, Assistant Quartermaster. Subsistence Department.--Capt. H. F. Clarke, Commissary of Subsistence. Medical Department.--Surgeon, W. S. King; Assistant Surgeon, David L. Magruder. First Division. Brigadier-General Daniel Tyler, Connecticut Militia, commanding. First Brigade.--Col. E. D. Keyes, 11th Infantry, commanding. 1st, 2d, & 3d Regiments Connecticut Volunteers; 4th Regime
E. P. Alexander (search for this): chapter 106
although more obstructed than yesterday's, have been entirely successful up to the time of writing. The column commenced moving at half-past 5 o'clock this morning, in the order observed yesterday, with a variation in the Third brigade, which was to-day headed by the gallant New York Sixty-ninth. The road, immediately after emerging from Vienna, enters heavy timber. About a mile from the village a heavy obstruction, consisting of about fifty large trees, was discovered in the road. Captain Alexander, of the Engineer corps, immediately put his pioneers to work with their axes, and in less than twenty minutes the whole of the barricade was cleared away and the column moved onward. Having reached the edge of the timber, two companies of each of the Connecticut regiments were again deployed as skirmishers on the right and left of the column, under command of Colonel Spiedel. Captain Hawley's company of the First Regiment had been in motion but a few minutes when it came up with thr
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