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Charles Griffin (search for this): chapter 106
ee men slightly wounded. General McDowell went forward at the head of the centre of the column, the Second division, under Col. Hunter, which was composed as follows:-- First Brigade, commanded by Col. Andrew Porter, United States Army; Capt. Griffin's battery United States artillery; three companies United States cavalry, under Major Palmer; a battalion of several companies of the First, Third, and Eighth United States infantry, under Major Sykes; a battalion of United States marines, undivision. After it came the Second Rhode Island battery and a section of Barry's battery. This was followed by the Second New Hampshire and the Seventy-first New York Regiments. The First brigade brought up the rear in the following order:--Griffin's battery, Major Sykes' United States infantry, Major Reynolds' United States Marines, and the Fourteenth, Twenty-seventh, and Eighth New York Volunteers. In this order the centre of the column left its bivouac, about six miles from Fairfax C
Thomas A. Davies (search for this): chapter 106
lunteers. reserve. Fourth Division. Brigadier-General Theodore Runyon, New Jersey Militia, commanding. 1st, 2d, 3d, & 4th Regiments New Jersey Militia, 3 months Volunteers; 1st, 2d, & 3d Regiments New Jersey Militia, 3 years Volunteers. Fifth Division. Col. D. S. Miles, 2d Infantry, commanding. First Brigade.--Col. Blenker, New York Volunteers, commanding. 8th & 29th Regiments New York Volunteers; Garibaldi Guard; 24th Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers. Second Brigade.--Colonel Davies, New York Volunteers, commanding. 16th, 18th, 31st, & 32d Regiments New York Volunteers; Company G, 2d Artillery, (Light Battery.) By command of Brig.-Gen. McDowell. James B. Fry, Assistant Adjutant-General. Boston Transcript narrative. Washington, July 18, 1861. It was a glorious sight, and a rarely interesting privilege, to witness the moving of the advance of General McDowell's vast column of troops towards the land oa Dixie, on Wednesday morning; and I send you the f
William F. Barry (search for this): chapter 106
ments of New York Volunteers. Second Brigade, commanded by Colonel A. E. Burnside, of the Rhode Island Volunteers. The First and Second Regiments Rhode Island Volunteers, the Second Rhode Island battery of flying artillery, one section of Captain Barry's battery of United States artillery, the Second Regiment New Hampshire Volunteers, and the Seventy-first Regiment New York State Militia. This division marched with its left brigade in front, consequently putting Colonel Burnside in advanshers in advance of the division. Their lines extended from half a mile to two miles on each side of the road. The First Rhode Island Regiment followed at the head of the division. After it came the Second Rhode Island battery and a section of Barry's battery. This was followed by the Second New Hampshire and the Seventy-first New York Regiments. The First brigade brought up the rear in the following order:--Griffin's battery, Major Sykes' United States infantry, Major Reynolds' United S
Theodore Runyon (search for this): chapter 106
York Volunteers; Company D, 2d Artillery, (Light Battery.) Third Brigade.--Col. O. O. Howard, Maine Volunteers, commanding. 2d, 4th, & 5th Regiments Maine Volunteers; 2d Regiment Vermont Volunteers. reserve. Fourth Division. Brigadier-General Theodore Runyon, New Jersey Militia, commanding. 1st, 2d, 3d, & 4th Regiments New Jersey Militia, 3 months Volunteers; 1st, 2d, & 3d Regiments New Jersey Militia, 3 years Volunteers. Fifth Division. Col. D. S. Miles, 2d Infantry, commanding. elman, United States Army; and the Fifth division, two brigades, under Colonel Dixon S. Miles, United States Army. The Fifth division proceeded by the old Braddock road, and the Third by the Little River turnpike. The Fourth division, under General Runyon, of New Jersey, constituted the reserve. There were in the whole column sixty-two regiments — about fifty-five thousand men — and in the marching divisions an aggregate of forty-five thousand. Upon all these roads the rebels had placed o
George Sykes (search for this): chapter 106
Col. Andrew Porter, United States Army; Capt. Griffin's battery United States artillery; three companies United States cavalry, under Major Palmer; a battalion of several companies of the First, Third, and Eighth United States infantry, under Major Sykes; a battalion of United States marines, under Major Reynolds; and the Eighth, Fourteenth, and Twenty-seventh Regiments of New York Volunteers. Second Brigade, commanded by Colonel A. E. Burnside, of the Rhode Island Volunteers. The First aname the Second Rhode Island battery and a section of Barry's battery. This was followed by the Second New Hampshire and the Seventy-first New York Regiments. The First brigade brought up the rear in the following order:--Griffin's battery, Major Sykes' United States infantry, Major Reynolds' United States Marines, and the Fourteenth, Twenty-seventh, and Eighth New York Volunteers. In this order the centre of the column left its bivouac, about six miles from Fairfax Court House, at ten o'
ortunity, without exposing the assailants to the fire of the guns in position behind the intrenchments. As the head of the division was approaching the intrenchment, sharp firing was heard on the left, which was afterwards ascertained to have been occasioned by a skirmish between the advance of Col. Miles' division and the Alabamians, who were in position there about two miles from the Court House. The intrenchment encountered by Colonel Hunter's division was erected upon the farm of Mr. Seegur, an emigrant to Virginia from New York. When it was first discovered a halt was called, and the advance brigade, under Colonel Burnside, was formed in close column and ordered to load. This was done with alacrity, and the men, when ordered forward, pressed on eagerly, singing Dixie and The Star Spangled banner. It was cheering to observe the enthusiasm exhibited by these volunteers, and quite amusing to hear their remarks, such as, We are going to open a mail route from Washington to Ri
J. G. Barnard (search for this): chapter 106
, Washington, July 8, 1861. Until otherwise ordered, the following will be the organization of the troops in this Department: staff of the Department Commander. Adjutant--General's Department.--Captain James B. Fry, Assistant Adjutant-General. Aides-de-Camp.--First-Lieutenant H. W. Kingsbury, 5th Artillery; Major Clarence S. Brown, N. Y. State Militia; Major James S. Wordsworth, N. Y. State Militia. Acting Inspector-General.--Major W. H. Wood, 17th Infantry. Engineers.--Major J. G. Barnard; First-Lieutenant F. E. Prime. Topographical Engineers.--Captain A. W. Whipple; First-Lieutenant Henry L. Abbott; Second-Lieutenant Haldimand S. Putnam. Quartermaster's Department.--Captain O. H. Tillinghast, Assistant Quartermaster. Subsistence Department.--Capt. H. F. Clarke, Commissary of Subsistence. Medical Department.--Surgeon, W. S. King; Assistant Surgeon, David L. Magruder. First Division. Brigadier-General Daniel Tyler, Connecticut Militia, commanding. First Bri
Doc. 97.-the advance into Virginia. July 16, 1861. General McDowell's army. the subjoined General Order gives the organization of the Staff and of the several divisions of the army under Brigadier-General McDowell, now advancing into Virginia from the lines opposite Washington. General orders no. 13. Headquarters, Department N. E. Virginia, Washington, July 8, 1861. Until otherwise ordered, the following will be the organization of the troops in this Department: staff of the Department Commander. Adjutant--General's Department.--Captain James B. Fry, Assistant Adjutant-General. Aides-de-Camp.--First-Lieutenant H. W. Kingsbury, 5th Artillery; Major Clarence S. Brown, N. Y. State Militia; Major James S. Wordsworth, N. Y. State Militia. Acting Inspector-General.--Major W. H. Wood, 17th Infantry. Engineers.--Major J. G. Barnard; First-Lieutenant F. E. Prime. Topographical Engineers.--Captain A. W. Whipple; First-Lieutenant Henry L. Abbott; Second-Lieutenant
d, and the intrenchments were quietly entered and taken possession of by the skirmishers. The position was a very strong one, and could have been easily defended. A large quantity of shovels, picks, bags of oats, buckets, &c., was found in the work, and camp fires were still burning in the rear of it. Half a mile further on, Germantown, a hamlet of half a dozen houses, was reached and found almost deserted. The only white person left stated that twenty-five hundred rebels, including Colonel Cash's South Carolina Regiment, had occupied the breastworks, and retreated only about fifteen minutes before the Union skirmishers appeared in sight of the town. A short halt is now being made for dinner by the First division, in the woods adjoining Germantown. The division will move on this afternoon to the vicinity of Centreville, where the enemy is said to be in strong force. half-past 1, P. M. General McDowell and staff have just arrived, at the head of four companies of cavalry.
Charles W. Russell (search for this): chapter 106
at a gallop, and down the road out into the country beyond, in search of the fugitives. After going four miles beyond Fairfax, and finding that the legs of the rebels were evidently the longest,--for they made the fastest time on record in this war, certainly,--our troopers returned, with the cannon, and joined the van again. Our party consisted of Hons. Schuyler Colfax, E. B. Washburn, Messrs. Dixon of New Jersey, Judge McKeon of New York, and two or three reporters for the press. Mr. Russell of the London Times, and Mr. Raymond of the N. Y. Times, were also together, with another party. Hundreds of persons arrived in Washington on Tuesday and Wednesday, who came expressly to see the battle. The hotels were packed full of human beings — the National alone turning away over four hundred guests, whom they could not lodge, for the crowd. A few Union people lingered behind in the village, who were greatly relieved, so they said, to see our army coming. In a few places along t
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