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sight; thither the command proceeded. At the outskirts of the village a small American flag, used as a guide mark by the Fourteenth New York Regiment, had been planted. It was saluted with cheers by the passing regiments. The rebel flag was still flying at the Court House when the advance of the division, with the band of the First Rhode Island Regiment playing national airs, entered the village. It was taken down by some of the men of the Second Rhode Island Regiment, and handed to Governor Sprague, who was with the brigade. It was transmitted by him to General McDowell as a legitimate trophy. Soon afterwards Colonel Marston, at the suggestion of one of the correspondents of the Herald, sent a detail of the Second New Hampshire Regiment, with their regimental flag, to give its folds to the breeze from the belfry of the Court House. Your correspondent aided in this demonstration, and the Court House bell, and all the tavern bells in the village rung forth a merry peal, and the
J. B. Richardson (search for this): chapter 106
unteers; Company E, 3d Artillery, (Light Battery.) Fourth Brigade.--Colonel J. B. Richardson, Michigan Volunteers, commanding. 2d & 3d Regiments Michigan Volunteern, consisting of four brigades, under command of Colonels Keyes, Sherman, and Richardson, led the van, and on approaching Fairfax, the artillery fired a cannon, which turned off to the left for this point — the fourth, under the command of Colonel Richardson, took a more direct route from their position near the Chain Bridge. Therepared for their night's rest. At about eight o'clock Col. Sherman's and Col. Richardson's brigades came in, and at this hour of writing--nine P. M.--the whole div dead and wounded Ohio men into Alexandria free of charge. The wife of Colonel Richardson, commanding the Fourth brigade, is the only lady with the expedition. ft of the road. The Third and Fourth brigades, under Colonel Sherman and Colonel Richardson, formed on the road. But the rebels abandoned their position as soon as
le from the village a heavy obstruction, consisting of about fifty large trees, was discovered in the road. Captain Alexander, of the Engineer corps, immediately put his pioneers to work with their axes, and in less than twenty minutes the whole of the barricade was cleared away and the column moved onward. Having reached the edge of the timber, two companies of each of the Connecticut regiments were again deployed as skirmishers on the right and left of the column, under command of Colonel Spiedel. Captain Hawley's company of the First Regiment had been in motion but a few minutes when it came up with three mounted rebels, who allowed themselves to be captured without resistance. At about the same time some stragglers of the Sixty-ninth, while upon an excursion to an adjoining farm-house, during a halt, surprised a fourth mounted rebel. The prisoners were brought before General Tyler, to whom they gave free information as to the position of the enemy. According to their statem
Frank Palmer (search for this): chapter 106
ts appearance the rebel force retreated hastily, and in evident confusion. All the casualties reported at Headquarters on our side are one officer and three men slightly wounded. General McDowell went forward at the head of the centre of the column, the Second division, under Col. Hunter, which was composed as follows:-- First Brigade, commanded by Col. Andrew Porter, United States Army; Capt. Griffin's battery United States artillery; three companies United States cavalry, under Major Palmer; a battalion of several companies of the First, Third, and Eighth United States infantry, under Major Sykes; a battalion of United States marines, under Major Reynolds; and the Eighth, Fourteenth, and Twenty-seventh Regiments of New York Volunteers. Second Brigade, commanded by Colonel A. E. Burnside, of the Rhode Island Volunteers. The First and Second Regiments Rhode Island Volunteers, the Second Rhode Island battery of flying artillery, one section of Captain Barry's battery of Uni
It was General McDowell's intention to follow the enemy up, at midnight, but the boys were so much fatigued with the sharp march of the day that it was deferred till this morning. It is ardently hoped that the rascals will make a stand at Manassas, where Beauregard is now in command, with some forty odd thousand men, it is said. But it is greatly feared they will run again. The rebels have got the idea, evidently, that the Zouaves, and the Gari-baldians, and Blenker's German Rifles, and DeKalb's sharpshooters, are so many devils in human shape, and they will be disinclined to withstand a charge from these troops. If Beauregard does not give us battle at Manassas, his army will be thus thoroughly demoralized, and he is beaten, past a ray of hope. From Fairfax our brave army moves toward Manassas, and thence — we hope, without delay — to Richmond! The fever's up, and our bold troops ask only to be led, and listen earnestly for the thrilling order--forward! They remember that
id L. Magruder. First Division. Brigadier-General Daniel Tyler, Connecticut Militia, commanding. First Brigade.--Col. E. D. Keyes, 11th Infantry, commanding. 1st, 2d, & 3d Regiments Connecticut Volunteers; 4th Regiment Maine Volunteers; Capt. Varian's Battery of New York 8th Regiment; Company B, 2d Cavalry. Second Brigade.--1st & 2d Regiments Ohio Volunteers; 2d Regiment New York Volunteers; Company E, 2d Artillery, (Light Battery.) Third Brigade.--Col. Wm. T. Sherman, 13th Infantryes up the road. With a spyglass the roads leading to Fairfax Court House could be seen covered with retreating rebels. The head of the First brigade came within a few hundred yards of a body of them, and Colonel Keyes ordered a section of Captain Varian's battery to throw a few shells among them, which was done with remarkable promptness. The enemy ran as soon as the first shot was fired. Hent's Hill, some two and a half miles west of Vienna, being reached, and the enemy being evidently
A. W. Whipple (search for this): chapter 106
organization of the troops in this Department: staff of the Department Commander. Adjutant--General's Department.--Captain James B. Fry, Assistant Adjutant-General. Aides-de-Camp.--First-Lieutenant H. W. Kingsbury, 5th Artillery; Major Clarence S. Brown, N. Y. State Militia; Major James S. Wordsworth, N. Y. State Militia. Acting Inspector-General.--Major W. H. Wood, 17th Infantry. Engineers.--Major J. G. Barnard; First-Lieutenant F. E. Prime. Topographical Engineers.--Captain A. W. Whipple; First-Lieutenant Henry L. Abbott; Second-Lieutenant Haldimand S. Putnam. Quartermaster's Department.--Captain O. H. Tillinghast, Assistant Quartermaster. Subsistence Department.--Capt. H. F. Clarke, Commissary of Subsistence. Medical Department.--Surgeon, W. S. King; Assistant Surgeon, David L. Magruder. First Division. Brigadier-General Daniel Tyler, Connecticut Militia, commanding. First Brigade.--Col. E. D. Keyes, 11th Infantry, commanding. 1st, 2d, & 3d Regiments Conne
J. B. Bowman (search for this): chapter 106
he cavalry company, went out reconnoitring this evening, and discovered obstructions on the road a short distance from town. The half demolished train of platform cars that carried the Ohio troops on their unfortunate reconnoissance of this point, some weeks since, is still standing where it was fired upon from the masked battery. Leonard B. Perkins, a well-known Union man of Fairfax County, acts as guide to the division. General Tyler's staff will spend the night at the house of Mr. J. B. Bowman, another enthusiastic Union man, who made himself so obnoxious to the rebels by transporting the dead and wounded Ohio men into Alexandria free of charge. The wife of Colonel Richardson, commanding the Fourth brigade, is the only lady with the expedition. Great relief is felt by all the Union men in this vicinity in consequence of the appearance of the Union troops, as rebel squads had for the last two days scoured the country for the purpose of forcibly impressing all male inhabi
H. F. Clarke (search for this): chapter 106
tenant H. W. Kingsbury, 5th Artillery; Major Clarence S. Brown, N. Y. State Militia; Major James S. Wordsworth, N. Y. State Militia. Acting Inspector-General.--Major W. H. Wood, 17th Infantry. Engineers.--Major J. G. Barnard; First-Lieutenant F. E. Prime. Topographical Engineers.--Captain A. W. Whipple; First-Lieutenant Henry L. Abbott; Second-Lieutenant Haldimand S. Putnam. Quartermaster's Department.--Captain O. H. Tillinghast, Assistant Quartermaster. Subsistence Department.--Capt. H. F. Clarke, Commissary of Subsistence. Medical Department.--Surgeon, W. S. King; Assistant Surgeon, David L. Magruder. First Division. Brigadier-General Daniel Tyler, Connecticut Militia, commanding. First Brigade.--Col. E. D. Keyes, 11th Infantry, commanding. 1st, 2d, & 3d Regiments Connecticut Volunteers; 4th Regiment Maine Volunteers; Capt. Varian's Battery of New York 8th Regiment; Company B, 2d Cavalry. Second Brigade.--1st & 2d Regiments Ohio Volunteers; 2d Regiment New York Volu
James S. Wordsworth (search for this): chapter 106
ing into Virginia from the lines opposite Washington. General orders no. 13. Headquarters, Department N. E. Virginia, Washington, July 8, 1861. Until otherwise ordered, the following will be the organization of the troops in this Department: staff of the Department Commander. Adjutant--General's Department.--Captain James B. Fry, Assistant Adjutant-General. Aides-de-Camp.--First-Lieutenant H. W. Kingsbury, 5th Artillery; Major Clarence S. Brown, N. Y. State Militia; Major James S. Wordsworth, N. Y. State Militia. Acting Inspector-General.--Major W. H. Wood, 17th Infantry. Engineers.--Major J. G. Barnard; First-Lieutenant F. E. Prime. Topographical Engineers.--Captain A. W. Whipple; First-Lieutenant Henry L. Abbott; Second-Lieutenant Haldimand S. Putnam. Quartermaster's Department.--Captain O. H. Tillinghast, Assistant Quartermaster. Subsistence Department.--Capt. H. F. Clarke, Commissary of Subsistence. Medical Department.--Surgeon, W. S. King; Assistant Surgeo
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