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F. E. Prime (search for this): chapter 106
1. Until otherwise ordered, the following will be the organization of the troops in this Department: staff of the Department Commander. Adjutant--General's Department.--Captain James B. Fry, Assistant Adjutant-General. Aides-de-Camp.--First-Lieutenant H. W. Kingsbury, 5th Artillery; Major Clarence S. Brown, N. Y. State Militia; Major James S. Wordsworth, N. Y. State Militia. Acting Inspector-General.--Major W. H. Wood, 17th Infantry. Engineers.--Major J. G. Barnard; First-Lieutenant F. E. Prime. Topographical Engineers.--Captain A. W. Whipple; First-Lieutenant Henry L. Abbott; Second-Lieutenant Haldimand S. Putnam. Quartermaster's Department.--Captain O. H. Tillinghast, Assistant Quartermaster. Subsistence Department.--Capt. H. F. Clarke, Commissary of Subsistence. Medical Department.--Surgeon, W. S. King; Assistant Surgeon, David L. Magruder. First Division. Brigadier-General Daniel Tyler, Connecticut Militia, commanding. First Brigade.--Col. E. D. Keyes, 1
left, or gave way, for the entrance of the cavalry and artillery. These dashed through the town at a gallop, and down the road out into the country beyond, in search of the fugitives. After going four miles beyond Fairfax, and finding that the legs of the rebels were evidently the longest,--for they made the fastest time on record in this war, certainly,--our troopers returned, with the cannon, and joined the van again. Our party consisted of Hons. Schuyler Colfax, E. B. Washburn, Messrs. Dixon of New Jersey, Judge McKeon of New York, and two or three reporters for the press. Mr. Russell of the London Times, and Mr. Raymond of the N. Y. Times, were also together, with another party. Hundreds of persons arrived in Washington on Tuesday and Wednesday, who came expressly to see the battle. The hotels were packed full of human beings — the National alone turning away over four hundred guests, whom they could not lodge, for the crowd. A few Union people lingered behind in the v
under Gen. M. L. Bonham, the successor in Congress of the notorious Brooks, and the commandant of the advance guard of the Potomac. In approaching this point our skirmishers had a brush with those of the rebels, in which a corporal of the Second Rhode Island Regiment received a flesh wound in the thigh, and a rebel officer was captured by Capt. Dyer. The advance of Burnside's brigade reached the fortification in time to make one prisoner, a South Carolina officer, who surrendered to Major Mission, paymaster of the Second Rhode Island Regiment. The inside of the fortification presented abundant evidences of the haste with which it had been abandoned by its late occupants. Sacks of flour, meat, clothing, arms, equipments, and camp utensils were everywhere scattered over the ground, and the camp fires, probably prepared for the noon meal, were still brightly burning. The main body of this force had left with haste only about two hours before the arrival of the head of our column.
W. C. Tompkins (search for this): chapter 106
x Court House, several houses were set on fire and burned to the ground. One of the houses belonged to a man named Ashley, said to be a Union man, driven from that neighborhood by the rebels soon after the fatal sortie into the village by Lieut. Tompkins. It was not ascertained whether these buildings had been set on fire by the soldiers wantonly, or by the Union men who desired to avenge their injuries, or by rebels who took this means to cast a stigma upon the Union forces; but General Mc leading towards the enemy, and the batteries accompanying the division are stationed so as to command all the approaches. The nearest picket of the enemy, one hundred strong, is only a mile from town, on the road to Fairfax Court House. Lieut. Tompkins, of the cavalry company, went out reconnoitring this evening, and discovered obstructions on the road a short distance from town. The half demolished train of platform cars that carried the Ohio troops on their unfortunate reconnoissance of
William T. Sherman (search for this): chapter 106
nts Ohio Volunteers; 2d Regiment New York Volunteers; Company E, 2d Artillery, (Light Battery.) Third Brigade.--Col. Wm. T. Sherman, 13th Infantry, commanding. 69th & 79th Regiments New York Militia; 13th Regiment New York Volunteers; 2d Regiments lookers — on in Vienna. Brig. General Tyler's column, consisting of four brigades, under command of Colonels Keyes, Sherman, and Richardson, led the van, and on approaching Fairfax, the artillery fired a cannon, which unluckily served to notifys, stacked their arms, partook of their cold supper, and then prepared for their night's rest. At about eight o'clock Col. Sherman's and Col. Richardson's brigades came in, and at this hour of writing--nine P. M.--the whole division is encamped abouenck's brigade to form in battle array in the fields, to the left of the road. The Third and Fourth brigades, under Colonel Sherman and Colonel Richardson, formed on the road. But the rebels abandoned their position as soon as General Schenck's co
was entered without leave, or in any way despoiled. Guards were placed wherever requested by the citizens, and stringent measures were taken by the commanding officers to prevent depredations. Eight men of different regiments were arrested by the Provost Marshal for pillaging, and were sent back under guard to Alexandria. At Germantown, and also in the vicinity of Fairfax Court House, several houses were set on fire and burned to the ground. One of the houses belonged to a man named Ashley, said to be a Union man, driven from that neighborhood by the rebels soon after the fatal sortie into the village by Lieut. Tompkins. It was not ascertained whether these buildings had been set on fire by the soldiers wantonly, or by the Union men who desired to avenge their injuries, or by rebels who took this means to cast a stigma upon the Union forces; but General McDowell declared that the first soldier proved to have set fire to any building should be summarily shot. It is natural th
Schuyler Colfax (search for this): chapter 106
e foot soldiers opened right and left, or gave way, for the entrance of the cavalry and artillery. These dashed through the town at a gallop, and down the road out into the country beyond, in search of the fugitives. After going four miles beyond Fairfax, and finding that the legs of the rebels were evidently the longest,--for they made the fastest time on record in this war, certainly,--our troopers returned, with the cannon, and joined the van again. Our party consisted of Hons. Schuyler Colfax, E. B. Washburn, Messrs. Dixon of New Jersey, Judge McKeon of New York, and two or three reporters for the press. Mr. Russell of the London Times, and Mr. Raymond of the N. Y. Times, were also together, with another party. Hundreds of persons arrived in Washington on Tuesday and Wednesday, who came expressly to see the battle. The hotels were packed full of human beings — the National alone turning away over four hundred guests, whom they could not lodge, for the crowd. A few Union
S. P. Heintzelman (search for this): chapter 106
Light Artillery, 2d R. I. Regiment. Third Division. Colonel S. P. Heintzelman, 17th Infantry, commanding. First Brigade.--Col. W. B.was composed of the Third division, three brigades, under Colonel S. P. Heintzelman, United States Army; and the Fifth division, two brigadeseneral McDowell sent word to the divisions of Colonels Miles and Heintzelman, composing the left wing, to halt, and himself and staff, escortintrenched upon the route of the divisions of Colonels Mills and Heintzelman. Early this morning the livery stables were besieged with apply, that General Tyler's First, and Colonel Hunter's Second, Colonel Heintzelman's Third, and Colonel Miles' Fifth division, representing a f House evacuated, and occupied by Colonel Hunter's division; Colonels Heintzelman and Miles's divisions are a short distance south of the Cours position about half way between Germantown and Centreville. Col. Heintzelman had not been heard from at three o'clock, and Gen. McDowell to
G. T. Beauregard (search for this): chapter 106
till this morning. It is ardently hoped that the rascals will make a stand at Manassas, where Beauregard is now in command, with some forty odd thousand men, it is said. But it is greatly feared thevils in human shape, and they will be disinclined to withstand a charge from these troops. If Beauregard does not give us battle at Manassas, his army will be thus thoroughly demoralized, and he is brom Washington to Richmond; We have come to Virginia to find a place to settle; We mean to bag Beauregard and Jeff Davis; We are the pacificators; They won't wait for us, &c. From the inside of thi, there must have been from 5,000 to 8,000 rebel troops here this morning. It is said that Gen. Beauregard was here in person last night, and left word for the troops, who were commanded by Col. Bon of intrenchments, constructed carefully and at leisure, under the immediate supervision of Gen. Beauregard, and the additional advantage of rapid railroad communication with Richmond and their base
Leonard B. Perkins (search for this): chapter 106
e approaches. The nearest picket of the enemy, one hundred strong, is only a mile from town, on the road to Fairfax Court House. Lieut. Tompkins, of the cavalry company, went out reconnoitring this evening, and discovered obstructions on the road a short distance from town. The half demolished train of platform cars that carried the Ohio troops on their unfortunate reconnoissance of this point, some weeks since, is still standing where it was fired upon from the masked battery. Leonard B. Perkins, a well-known Union man of Fairfax County, acts as guide to the division. General Tyler's staff will spend the night at the house of Mr. J. B. Bowman, another enthusiastic Union man, who made himself so obnoxious to the rebels by transporting the dead and wounded Ohio men into Alexandria free of charge. The wife of Colonel Richardson, commanding the Fourth brigade, is the only lady with the expedition. Great relief is felt by all the Union men in this vicinity in consequence o
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