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Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 126
tment, little Rock, Jan. 29, 1861. To His Excellency John Ross, Principal Chief of Cherokee Nation:-- sir: It may now be regarded as almost certain that the States having slave property within their borders will, in consequence of repeated Northern aggressions, separate themselves and withdraw from the Federal Government. South Carolina, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, Georgia, and Louisiana have already, by action of the people, assumed this attitude. Arkansas, Missouri, Tennessee, Kentucky, Virginia, North Carolina, and Maryland will probably pursue the same course by the 4th of March next. Your people, in their institutions, productions, latitude, and natural sympathies, are allied to the common brotherhood of the slave-holding States. Our people and yours are natural allies in war, and friends in peace. Your country is salubrious and fertile, and possesses the highest capacity for future progress and development, by the application of slave labor. Besides this, the
Headquarters (Washington, United States) (search for this): chapter 126
gation of any such obnoxious fruit upon their soil. And, in conclusion, I have the honor to reciprocate the salutations of friendship. I am, sir, very respectfully, your Excellency's obedient servant, John Ross, Principal Chief of Cherokee Nation. Feb. 22, 1861. A correspondence was more recently opened between the rebel commander of Fort Smith and Ross. The letter of the former exhibits the solicitude with which the rebels of Arkansas await the attitude of the Cherokees:-- Headquarters, Fort Smith, May 15, 1861. sir:--Information has reached this post to the effect that Senator Lane, of Kansas, is now in that State raising troops to operate on the western borders of Missouri and Kansas. As it is of the utmost importance that those intrusted with the defence of the Western frontier of this State should understand the position of the Indian tribes, through whose territory the enemy is likely to pass, I feel it to be my duty, as commanding officer at this post, and in
Park Hill (Oklahoma, United States) (search for this): chapter 126
rospective than real. It has not been declared by the United or Confederate States. It may not be. I most devoutly hope it might not be. Your difficulties may be ended soon by compromise or peaceful separation. What will then be our situation if we now abrogate our rights, when no one else is, or can just now be, bound for them? All these questions present themselves to us and constrain us to avow a position of strict neutrality. That position I shall endeavor honestly to maintain. The Cherokee Nation will not interfere with your rights nor invade your soil, nor will I doubt that the people of Arkansas and other States will be alike just toward the Cherokee people. With my best wishes for you personally, I have the. honor to be, very respectfully, your friend and obedient servant, John Ross, Principal Chief, Cherokee Nation. Park hill, May 18, 1861. To Messrs. Mark Bean, W. B. Welch, E. W. McClure, John Spencer, J. A. L. McCulloch, John M. Lacy, J. P. Carnahan, and others.
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 126
and various rebel authorities and citizens of Arkansas: State of Arkansas, Executive DepartmenState of Arkansas, Executive Department, little Rock, Jan. 29, 1861. To His Excellency John Ross, Principal Chief of Cherokee Nation:-- tion of the people, assumed this attitude. Arkansas, Missouri, Tennessee, Kentucky, Virginia, Norl established that the Indian country west of Arkansas is looked to by the incoming Administration o see proper to communicate to the Governor of Arkansas, who is your friend and the friend of your peedient servant, Henry M. Rector, Governor of Arkansas. In response to the above, Ross wrote at established that the Indian country, west of Arkansas, is looked to by the incoming Administration ibits the solicitude with which the rebels of Arkansas await the attitude of the Cherokees:-- Histing any such attempt to invade the soil of Arkansas; or if, on the other hand, you think there isr doubt as to my friendship for the people of Arkansas; but if my present position does not constitu[3 more...]
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 126
of the Cherokee nation and various rebel authorities and citizens of Arkansas: State of Arkansas, Executive Department, little Rock, Jan. 29, 1861. To His Excellency John Ross, Principal Chief of Cherokee Nation:-- sir: It may now be regarded as almost certain that the States having slave property within their borders will, in consequence of repeated Northern aggressions, separate themselves and withdraw from the Federal Government. South Carolina, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, Georgia, and Louisiana have already, by action of the people, assumed this attitude. Arkansas, Missouri, Tennessee, Kentucky, Virginia, North Carolina, and Maryland will probably pursue the same course by the 4th of March next. Your people, in their institutions, productions, latitude, and natural sympathies, are allied to the common brotherhood of the slave-holding States. Our people and yours are natural allies in war, and friends in peace. Your country is salubrious and fertile, and poss
Florida (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 126
sed between the chief of the Cherokee nation and various rebel authorities and citizens of Arkansas: State of Arkansas, Executive Department, little Rock, Jan. 29, 1861. To His Excellency John Ross, Principal Chief of Cherokee Nation:-- sir: It may now be regarded as almost certain that the States having slave property within their borders will, in consequence of repeated Northern aggressions, separate themselves and withdraw from the Federal Government. South Carolina, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, Georgia, and Louisiana have already, by action of the people, assumed this attitude. Arkansas, Missouri, Tennessee, Kentucky, Virginia, North Carolina, and Maryland will probably pursue the same course by the 4th of March next. Your people, in their institutions, productions, latitude, and natural sympathies, are allied to the common brotherhood of the slave-holding States. Our people and yours are natural allies in war, and friends in peace. Your country is salubrious
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 126
s Excellency John Ross, Principal Chief of Cherokee Nation:-- sir: It may now be regarded as almost certain that the States having slave property within their borders will, in consequence of repeated Northern aggressions, separate themselves and withdraw from the Federal Government. South Carolina, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, Georgia, and Louisiana have already, by action of the people, assumed this attitude. Arkansas, Missouri, Tennessee, Kentucky, Virginia, North Carolina, and Maryland will probably pursue the same course by the 4th of March next. Your people, in their institutions, productions, latitude, and natural sympathies, are allied to the common brotherhood of the slave-holding States. Our people and yours are natural allies in war, and friends in peace. Your country is salubrious and fertile, and possesses the highest capacity for future progress and development, by the application of slave labor. Besides this, the contiguity of our territory with yours i
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 126
which passed between the chief of the Cherokee nation and various rebel authorities and citizens of Arkansas: State of Arkansas, Executive Department, little Rock, Jan. 29, 1861. To His Excellency John Ross, Principal Chief of Cherokee Nation:-- sir: It may now be regarded as almost certain that the States having slave property within their borders will, in consequence of repeated Northern aggressions, separate themselves and withdraw from the Federal Government. South Carolina, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, Georgia, and Louisiana have already, by action of the people, assumed this attitude. Arkansas, Missouri, Tennessee, Kentucky, Virginia, North Carolina, and Maryland will probably pursue the same course by the 4th of March next. Your people, in their institutions, productions, latitude, and natural sympathies, are allied to the common brotherhood of the slave-holding States. Our people and yours are natural allies in war, and friends in peace. Your country is s
Oklahoma (Oklahoma, United States) (search for this): chapter 126
spondence which passed between the chief of the Cherokee nation and various rebel authorities and citizens of ATo His Excellency John Ross, Principal Chief of Cherokee Nation:-- sir: It may now be regarded as almost cerof the United States is solemnly pledged to the Cherokee nation for the protection of the right and title in thbedient servant, John Ross, Principal Chief of Cherokee Nation. Feb. 22, 1861. A correspondence was more r Fort Smith. Hon. John Ross, Principal Chief of Cherokee Nation. In his reply, Ross, under date of May 17, ts and obligations were established between the Cherokee nation and the Government of those States. Those rela obedient servant, John Ross, Principal Chief, Cherokee Nation. J. R. Kannady, Lieut. Commanding, Fort Smith,ion I shall endeavor honestly to maintain. The Cherokee Nation will not interfere with your rights nor invade obedient servant, John Ross, Principal Chief, Cherokee Nation. Park hill, May 18, 1861. To Messrs. Mark Bean,
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 126
tive Department, little Rock, Jan. 29, 1861. To His Excellency John Ross, Principal Chief of Cherokee Nation:-- sir: It may now be regarded as almost certain that the States having slave property within their borders will, in consequence of repeated Northern aggressions, separate themselves and withdraw from the Federal Government. South Carolina, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, Georgia, and Louisiana have already, by action of the people, assumed this attitude. Arkansas, Missouri, Tennessee, Kentucky, Virginia, North Carolina, and Maryland will probably pursue the same course by the 4th of March next. Your people, in their institutions, productions, latitude, and natural sympathies, are allied to the common brotherhood of the slave-holding States. Our people and yours are natural allies in war, and friends in peace. Your country is salubrious and fertile, and possesses the highest capacity for future progress and development, by the application of slave labor. Besides
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