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Fayetteville (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 146
y, and the existing war; and then he. asks, Why all this? The answer must be apparent to all. But first, let me supply a chronological table of events on the other side: December 27. The revenue cutter William Aiken surrendered by her commander, and taken possession of by South Carolina. December 28. Fort Moultrie and Castle Pinckney, at Charleston, seized. December 30. The United States arsenal at Charleston seized. January 2. Fort Macon and the United States arsenal at Fayetteville seized by North Carolina. January 3. Forts Pulaski and Jackson, and the United States arsenal at Savannah, seized by Georgia troops. January 4. Fort Morgan and the United States arsenal at Mobile seized by Alabama. January 8. Forts Johnson and Caswell, at Smithville, seized by North Carolina; restored by order of Gov. Ellis. January 9. The Star of the West, bearing reinforcements to Major Anderson, fired at in Charleston harbor. January 10. The steamer Marion seized by So
Fort McRae (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 146
and Caswell, at Smithville, seized by North Carolina; restored by order of Gov. Ellis. January 9. The Star of the West, bearing reinforcements to Major Anderson, fired at in Charleston harbor. January 10. The steamer Marion seized by South Carolina; restored on the 11th. January 11. The United States arsenal at Baton Rouge, and Forts Pike, St. Philip, and Jackson, seized by Louisiana. January 12. Fort Barrancas and the navy-yard at Pensacola seized by Florida. January 12. Fort McRae, at Pensacola, seized by Florida. These forts cost $5,947,000, are pierced for 1,099 guns, and are adapted for a war garrison of 5,430 men. We find, as was shown here the other day, and as has been shown on former occasions, that the State of South Carolina seceded, or attempted to secede, from this confederacy of States without cause. In seceding, her first step was a violation of the Constitution. She seceded on the 20th of last December, making the first innovation and violation
Fort Morgan (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 146
ther side: December 27. The revenue cutter William Aiken surrendered by her commander, and taken possession of by South Carolina. December 28. Fort Moultrie and Castle Pinckney, at Charleston, seized. December 30. The United States arsenal at Charleston seized. January 2. Fort Macon and the United States arsenal at Fayetteville seized by North Carolina. January 3. Forts Pulaski and Jackson, and the United States arsenal at Savannah, seized by Georgia troops. January 4. Fort Morgan and the United States arsenal at Mobile seized by Alabama. January 8. Forts Johnson and Caswell, at Smithville, seized by North Carolina; restored by order of Gov. Ellis. January 9. The Star of the West, bearing reinforcements to Major Anderson, fired at in Charleston harbor. January 10. The steamer Marion seized by South Carolina; restored on the 11th. January 11. The United States arsenal at Baton Rouge, and Forts Pike, St. Philip, and Jackson, seized by Louisiana. Jan
France (France) (search for this): chapter 146
tisfied with a government of the people; they have lost confidence in iran's capacity for self-government; and furthermore, they would be willing to form an alliance with Great Britain; or, if Great Britain were slow in forming the alliance, with France; and they know they can succeed there, on account of the hate and malignity which exist between the two nations. They would be willing to pass under the reign of the amiable and constitutional Queen of Great Britain! Sir, I love woman, and womaparted the garments of our Saviour, and upon his vesture cast lots — went out of this body and was made Attorney-General, to show his patriotism and disinterestedness — nothing else! Mr. Slidell, disinterested altogether, is to go as Minister to France. I might enumerate many such instances. This is all patriotism, pure disinterestedness! Do we not see where it all ends? Disappointed, impatient, unhallowed ambition. There has been no cause for breaking up this Government; there have been n
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 146
int resolution approving the action of the President: Here in Washington, in Kentucky, in Missouri, everywhere where the authority of the President extends, in his discretion he will feel himselThere is still foreign pauper labor ready to supply their place. Maryland, Virginia, Kentucky, Missouri, possibly Tennessee and North Carolina, may lose their slaves as New York, Pennsylvania, and Neg the war of 1812? In this connection I desire to read some remarks made by the Senator from Missouri (Mr. Polk) in his speech the other day, in regard to this general idea of who made the war. to place before the Senate the remarks of both the Senators from Kentucky and the Senator from Missouri, and to answer them at the same time. The Senator from Missouri says the war was brought on siMissouri says the war was brought on since the 4th of March by the President of the United States of his own motion. The Senator from Kentucky (Mr. Powell) pronounces it an unjust, an unrighteous, and an unholy war. But, sir, I commenc
California (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 146
d a long disquisition, and a very feeling one, from the Senator from Kentucky. He became pathetic in the hopelessness of compromises. Did not the Senator from California, [Mr. Latham,] the other day, show unmistakably that it was not compromise they wanted? I will add that compromise was the thing they most feared; and their grgreed upon; that their last and only pretext would be swept from under them, and that they would stand before the country naked and exposed. The Senator from California pointed out to you a number of them who stood here and did not vote for certain propositions, and those propositions were lost. What was the action before the m a Union man now. And what has transpired since the election in November last that has produced sufficient cause to break up this Government? The Senator from California enumerated the facts up to the 25th day of May, 1860, when there was a vote taken in this body for the protection of slave property in the Territories. Now, fr
Winchester, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 146
ember, stating that arrests had been made of persons inimical to the American States, and desiring the advice of Congress particularly whether Augusta and Winchester, in Virginia, would not be proper places at which to secure prisoners. * * * Congress must have been aware that it was becoming a case of very unjust suffering, foers of the society of Friends. They were ordered first to Staunton, then a frontier town in the western settlement of Virginia, but afterward to be detained at Winchester, where they were kept in partial confinement nearly eight months, without provision being made for their support; for the only reference to this was by a resoluprisoners sent to Virginia, the expenses of their journey, and all other incidental charges, be paid by the said prisoners. During the stay of the exiles at Winchester, nearly all of them suffered greatly from circumstances unavoidable in their situation — from anxiety, separation from their families, left un-protected in Phil
en violated, and he says that since the Government commenced, there has not been a case equal to the one which has recently transpired in Maryland. I shall take up some of his points in their order, and speak of them as I think they deserve to be spoken of. The Senator says: The civil authorities of the country are paralyzed, and a practical martial law is being established all over the land. The like never happened in this country before, and would not be tolerated in any country in Europe which pretends to the elements of civilization and regulated liberty. George Washington carried the thirteen colonies through the war of the Revolution without martial law. The President of the United States cannot conduct the Government three months without resorting to it. The Senator puts great stress on the point, and speaks of it in very emphatic language, that General Washington carried the country through the seven years of the Revolution without resorting to martial law during al
Fort Caswell (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 146
possession of by South Carolina. December 28. Fort Moultrie and Castle Pinckney, at Charleston, seized. December 30. The United States arsenal at Charleston seized. January 2. Fort Macon and the United States arsenal at Fayetteville seized by North Carolina. January 3. Forts Pulaski and Jackson, and the United States arsenal at Savannah, seized by Georgia troops. January 4. Fort Morgan and the United States arsenal at Mobile seized by Alabama. January 8. Forts Johnson and Caswell, at Smithville, seized by North Carolina; restored by order of Gov. Ellis. January 9. The Star of the West, bearing reinforcements to Major Anderson, fired at in Charleston harbor. January 10. The steamer Marion seized by South Carolina; restored on the 11th. January 11. The United States arsenal at Baton Rouge, and Forts Pike, St. Philip, and Jackson, seized by Louisiana. January 12. Fort Barrancas and the navy-yard at Pensacola seized by Florida. January 12. Fort McRae,
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 146
o exist hereafter. In the Constitution of South Carolina it is provided that No person shall bend ten negroes. This is the notion that South Carolina has of the necessary qualifications of a mre else — if he desires to seek under this South Carolina Government for his lost rights? I do not n looking further into the Constitution of South Carolina, in order to ascertain what are her princi their Constitution, I find a protest from South Carolina against a decision of that Congress in relember of the Convention that took the State of South Carolina out of the Union, says in this protes continues: And even in this State, (South Carolina,) the ultimate result is not determined. ractical war. Who began it? Then, sir, if South Carolina secedes, withdraws from the Union, becomesow do they stand? I have just stated that South Carolina seceded — withdrew from the Confederacy; ad the law morally and legally? Was it not South Carolina in seceding? And yet you talk about the P[8 more...]<
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