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Jefferson City (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 164
have entreated those who were about to engage in war to withhold their hands from the strife, and in this course we know that we but expressed the wishes and feelings of the State. Our entreaties have been unheeded; and now, while war is raging in other parts of our common country, we have felt that our first and highest duty is to preserve, if possible, our own State from its ravages. The danger is imminent, and demands prompt and decisive measures of prevention. We have assembled in Jefferson under circumstances widely different from those that existed when the Convention adjourned its session at St. Louis. We find high officers of the State Government engaged in actual hostilities with the forces of the United States, and blood has been spilt upon the soil of Missouri. Many of our citizens have yielded obedience to an ill-judged call of the Governor, and have assembled in arms for the purpose of repelling the invasion of the State by armed bands of lawless invaders, as the
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 164
Doc. 145.-address to the people of Missouri. The following address, reported and adopted in thes, and blood has been spilt upon the soil of Missouri. Many of our citizens have yielded obedienceil 28, 1861. The writer says: I do not think Missouri should secede to-day or to-morrow, but I do nbe said about the time or the manner in which Missouri should go out. That she ought to go, and will fixed mind and purpose of the Governor, that Missouri shall leave the Union. He wants time — a littes. Here is the second executive officer of Missouri avowedly engaged in travelling through States which he must regard while Missouri continues in the Union as foreign States, and those States endewas by obtaining military aid, and this while Missouri continued in the Union. The result of the joer that the schemes of those who seek to take Missouri out of the Union may not further be aided by very person can see that, while the forces of Missouri may be employed in repelling the invasion, it[17 more...]
St. Louis (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 164
State from its ravages. The danger is imminent, and demands prompt and decisive measures of prevention. We have assembled in Jefferson under circumstances widely different from those that existed when the Convention adjourned its session at St. Louis. We find high officers of the State Government engaged in actual hostilities with the forces of the United States, and blood has been spilt upon the soil of Missouri. Many of our citizens have yielded obedience to an ill-judged call of the is made, doubtless, upon some plan of his own, independent of the Convention. Nine days after this letter to the President of the Arkansas Convention, he wrote another, addressed to J. W. Tucker, Esq., the editor of a secession newspaper in St. Louis. This letter is dated April 28, 1861. The writer says: I do not think Missouri should secede to-day or to-morrow, but I do not think it good policy that I should so openly declare. I want a little time to arm the State, and I am assuming eve
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 164
of lawless invaders, as the troops of the United States are designated by the Governor in his procon of our Governor in his contest with the United States, and this at the request of our Executive.ere was no interference by soldiers of the United States with any of the citizens, or with the peacvindication of our speedy union with the Confederate States. Here is the second executive officer o people assurance that the people of the Confederate States, though engaged in a war with a powerfulvering the connection of Missouri with the United States, the General Assembly was called, and when to act aginst all opposers, including the United States. By these acts, schools are closed, and t break the connection of Missouri with the United States which had before been manifested by Gov. Jng relations between the Government of the United States, the people and governments of the differee institutions which she has as one of the United States. But no distinction could be made among t[1 more...]
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 164
roclamation of the 17th day of June last. We find that troops from the State of Arkansas have come into Missouri for the purpose of sustaining the action of our Gsouri will be ready for secession in less than thirty days, and will secede if Arkansas will only get out of the way and give her a free passage. It will presentlyd by Thomas C. Reynolds, the Lieutenant-Governor, in which he declares that in Arkansas, Tennessee, and Virginia his efforts have been directed unceasingly, to the beond executive officers of the State has been that a body of military forces of Arkansas has actually invaded Missouri, to carry out the schemes of your own officer, w Let us take the case, then, of an armed invasion of the State by troops from Arkansas, neither invited nor headed by the Governor of Missouri. The vindication of tsion. To consider the relations existing between the people and Government of Arkansas and the people and Government of Missouri, and to adopt measures to vindicate
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 164
on the present condition of affairs within our State. Since the adjournment of this Convention in March last, the most startling events have rushed upon us with such rapidity that the nation stands astonished at the condition of anarchy and strife to which, in so brief a period, it has been reduced. When the Convention adjourned, although the muttering of the storm was heard, it seemed to be distant, and it was hoped that some quiet but powerful force might be applied by a beneficent Providence, to avert its fury, and preserve our country from threatened ruin. That hope has not been realized. The storm, in all its fury, has burst upon the country — the armed hosts of different sections have met each other in bloody conflict, and the grave has already received the remains of thousands of slaughtered citizens. Reason inflamed to madness demands that the stream of blood shall flow broader and deeper; and the whole energies of a people, but a few months since prosperous and happy,
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 164
s, or with the peace of the State. The event which produced exasperation through the State, the capture of Camp Jackson, did not take place until the 10th of May. Yet, the evidence is conclusive that there was at the time of this correspondence a secret plan for taking Missouri out of the Union without any assent of the people through their Convention. An address to the people of Missouri was issued by Thomas C. Reynolds, the Lieutenant-Governor, in which he declares that in Arkansas, Tennessee, and Virginia his efforts have been directed unceasingly, to the best of his limited ability, to the promotion of our interests, indissolubly connected with the vindication of our speedy union with the Confederate States. Here is the second executive officer of Missouri avowedly engaged in travelling through States which he must regard while Missouri continues in the Union as foreign States, and those States endeavoring, as he says, to promote the interests of our State. The mode of pr
David Walker (search for this): chapter 164
been enabled to ascertain by some correspondence of different public officers, accidentally made public, that several of these officers not only entertained and expressed opinions and wishes against the continuance of Missouri in the Union, but actually engaged in schemes to withdraw her from the Union, contrary to your known wishes. After the adjournment of your Convention, which had expressed your purpose to remain in the Union, Governor Claiborne F. Jackson, in a letter addressed to David Walker, President of the Arkansas Convention, dated April 19, 1861, says: From the beginning, my own conviction has been that the interest, duty, and honor of every slaveholding State demand their separation from the non-slaveholding States. Again, he says: I have been, from the beginning, in favor of decided and prompt action on the part of the Southern States, but the majority of the people of Missouri, up to the present time, have differed with me. Here we have the declaration of his opinio
Doc. 145.-address to the people of Missouri. The following address, reported and adopted in the Missouri State Convention on July 31st, derives additional interest from the fact that the Chairman of the Committee, and probably its sole author, was Judge Hamilton R. Gamble, who was on the same day elected by the Convention Governor of the State, in place of the traitor Claib. Jackson: To the People of the State of Missouri:-- Your delegates assembled in Convention propose to address you upon the present condition of affairs within our State. Since the adjournment of this Convention in March last, the most startling events have rushed upon us with such rapidity that the nation stands astonished at the condition of anarchy and strife to which, in so brief a period, it has been reduced. When the Convention adjourned, although the muttering of the storm was heard, it seemed to be distant, and it was hoped that some quiet but powerful force might be applied by a beneficen
Hamilton R. Gamble (search for this): chapter 164
Doc. 145.-address to the people of Missouri. The following address, reported and adopted in the Missouri State Convention on July 31st, derives additional interest from the fact that the Chairman of the Committee, and probably its sole author, was Judge Hamilton R. Gamble, who was on the same day elected by the Convention Governor of the State, in place of the traitor Claib. Jackson: To the People of the State of Missouri:-- Your delegates assembled in Convention propose to address you upon the present condition of affairs within our State. Since the adjournment of this Convention in March last, the most startling events have rushed upon us with such rapidity that the nation stands astonished at the condition of anarchy and strife to which, in so brief a period, it has been reduced. When the Convention adjourned, although the muttering of the storm was heard, it seemed to be distant, and it was hoped that some quiet but powerful force might be applied by a beneficent
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