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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 205
consciences. I have driven the enemy from among you. The time has now arrived for the people of the State to act. You can no longer procrastinate. Missouri must now take her position, be it North or South. Ben. McCulloch, Brig.-General Commanding. Ben. McCulloch's order. Headquarters of Western army, near Springfield, Mo., Aug. 12, 1861. The General commanding takes great pleasure in announcing to the army under his command the signal victory it has just gained. Soldiers of Louisiana, of Arkansas, of Missouri, and of Texas, nobly have you sustained yourselves. Shoulder to shoulder you have met the enemy and driven him before you. Your first battle has been glorious, and your general is proud of you. The opposing force, composed mostly of the old regular army of the North, have thrown themselves upon you confident of victory, but by great gallantry and determined courage you have routed it with great slaughter. Several pieces of artillery and many prisoners are now in
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 205
rters Western army, camp near Spingfield, Mo., Aug. 12, 1861. To the People of Missouri:-- Having been called by the Governor of your State to assist in driving thNorth; your beautiful State has been nearly subjugated, but those true sons of Missouri who have continued in arms, together with my force, came back upon the enemy, al officers wounded; their army is in full flight; and now, if the true men of Missouri will rise up and rally around our standard, the State will be redeemed. I do rested by the army will be released and allowed to return to their friends. Missouri must be allowed to choose her own destiny — no oaths binding your consciences. arrived for the people of the State to act. You can no longer procrastinate. Missouri must now take her position, be it North or South. Ben. McCulloch, Brig.-Generthe signal victory it has just gained. Soldiers of Louisiana, of Arkansas, of Missouri, and of Texas, nobly have you sustained yourselves. Shoulder to shoulder you
Springfield, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 205
d for the people of the State to act. You can no longer procrastinate. Missouri must now take her position, be it North or South. Ben. McCulloch, Brig.-General Commanding. Ben. McCulloch's order. Headquarters of Western army, near Springfield, Mo., Aug. 12, 1861. The General commanding takes great pleasure in announcing to the army under his command the signal victory it has just gained. Soldiers of Louisiana, of Arkansas, of Missouri, and of Texas, nobly have you sustained yourseu have routed it with great slaughter. Several pieces of artillery and many prisoners are now in your hands. The commander-in-chief of the enemy is slain, and many of the general officers wounded. The flag of the Confederacy now floats near Springfield, the stronghold of the enemy. The friends of our cause who have been imprisoned there are released. While announcing to the army the great victory, the General hopes that the laurels you have gained will not be tarnished by a single outrage.
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 205
I have driven the enemy from among you. The time has now arrived for the people of the State to act. You can no longer procrastinate. Missouri must now take her position, be it North or South. Ben. McCulloch, Brig.-General Commanding. Ben. McCulloch's order. Headquarters of Western army, near Springfield, Mo., Aug. 12, 1861. The General commanding takes great pleasure in announcing to the army under his command the signal victory it has just gained. Soldiers of Louisiana, of Arkansas, of Missouri, and of Texas, nobly have you sustained yourselves. Shoulder to shoulder you have met the enemy and driven him before you. Your first battle has been glorious, and your general is proud of you. The opposing force, composed mostly of the old regular army of the North, have thrown themselves upon you confident of victory, but by great gallantry and determined courage you have routed it with great slaughter. Several pieces of artillery and many prisoners are now in your hands.
Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 205
among you. The time has now arrived for the people of the State to act. You can no longer procrastinate. Missouri must now take her position, be it North or South. Ben. McCulloch, Brig.-General Commanding. Ben. McCulloch's order. Headquarters of Western army, near Springfield, Mo., Aug. 12, 1861. The General commanding takes great pleasure in announcing to the army under his command the signal victory it has just gained. Soldiers of Louisiana, of Arkansas, of Missouri, and of Texas, nobly have you sustained yourselves. Shoulder to shoulder you have met the enemy and driven him before you. Your first battle has been glorious, and your general is proud of you. The opposing force, composed mostly of the old regular army of the North, have thrown themselves upon you confident of victory, but by great gallantry and determined courage you have routed it with great slaughter. Several pieces of artillery and many prisoners are now in your hands. The commander-in-chief of th
Doc. 180.-proclamation of Ben. McCulloch. Headquarters Western army, camp near Spingfield, Mo., Aug. 12, 1861. To the People of Missouri:-- Having been called by the Governor of your State to assist in driving the National forces out of the State, and in restoring the people to their just rights, I have come among you simply with the view of making war upon our Northern foes, to drive them back, and give the oppressed of your State an opportunity of again standing up as freemen, and uttering their true sentiments. You have been overrun and trampled upon by the mercenary hordes of the North; your beautiful State has been nearly subjugated, but those true sons of Missouri who have continued in arms, together with my force, came back upon the enemy, and we have gained over them a great and signal victory. Their General-in-chief is slain, and many of their other general officers wounded; their army is in full flight; and now, if the true men of Missouri will rise up and r
Benjamin McCulloch (search for this): chapter 205
Doc. 180.-proclamation of Ben. McCulloch. Headquarters Western army, camp near Spingfield, Mo., Aug. 12, 1861. To the People of Missouri:-- Having been called by the Governor of your State to assist in driving the National forces out of thle of the State to act. You can no longer procrastinate. Missouri must now take her position, be it North or South. Ben. McCulloch, Brig.-General Commanding. Ben. McCulloch's order. Headquarters of Western army, near Springfield, Mo., AugBen. McCulloch's order. Headquarters of Western army, near Springfield, Mo., Aug. 12, 1861. The General commanding takes great pleasure in announcing to the army under his command the signal victory it has just gained. Soldiers of Louisiana, of Arkansas, of Missouri, and of Texas, nobly have you sustained yourselves. Shouldsingle outrage. The private property of citizens of either party must be respected. Soldiers who fought as you did day before yesterday cannot rob or plunder. By order of Ben. McCulloch. Jas. Mointosh, Captain C. S. A., and Adjutant-General.
James Mointosh (search for this): chapter 205
ven him before you. Your first battle has been glorious, and your general is proud of you. The opposing force, composed mostly of the old regular army of the North, have thrown themselves upon you confident of victory, but by great gallantry and determined courage you have routed it with great slaughter. Several pieces of artillery and many prisoners are now in your hands. The commander-in-chief of the enemy is slain, and many of the general officers wounded. The flag of the Confederacy now floats near Springfield, the stronghold of the enemy. The friends of our cause who have been imprisoned there are released. While announcing to the army the great victory, the General hopes that the laurels you have gained will not be tarnished by a single outrage. The private property of citizens of either party must be respected. Soldiers who fought as you did day before yesterday cannot rob or plunder. By order of Ben. McCulloch. Jas. Mointosh, Captain C. S. A., and Adjutant-General.
August 12th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 205
Doc. 180.-proclamation of Ben. McCulloch. Headquarters Western army, camp near Spingfield, Mo., Aug. 12, 1861. To the People of Missouri:-- Having been called by the Governor of your State to assist in driving the National forces out of the State, and in restoring the people to their just rights, I have come among you simply with the view of making war upon our Northern foes, to drive them back, and give the oppressed of your State an opportunity of again standing up as freemen, and of the State to act. You can no longer procrastinate. Missouri must now take her position, be it North or South. Ben. McCulloch, Brig.-General Commanding. Ben. McCulloch's order. Headquarters of Western army, near Springfield, Mo., Aug. 12, 1861. The General commanding takes great pleasure in announcing to the army under his command the signal victory it has just gained. Soldiers of Louisiana, of Arkansas, of Missouri, and of Texas, nobly have you sustained yourselves. Shoulder