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Cairo, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 220
Doc. 195.-battle of Charleston, Mo. Gen, Fremont's despatch. St. Louis, August 20, 1861. To Colonel E. D. Townsend:-- Report from commanding officer at Cairo says that Col. Dougherty, with three hundred men, sent out yesterday at seven o'clock from Bird's Point, attacked the enemy at Charleston, one thousand two hundred ith twenty thousand men in a few days! Another of our prisoners says that he made a speech to them yesterday, and promised them that they should take breakfast in Cairo this morning! The prisoners look bad. About one-third of them appear intelligent — the balance have about half sense, and have certainly been induced to take up arms against their Government by the misrepresentations of the designing. N. Y. Tribune account. Cairo, Ill, August 20, 1861. Times are somewhat exciting here to-day. Our boys are at work, and were well paid for their labor last night and to-day. It has been known for several days that the secessionists were occupying
St. Louis (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 220
Doc. 195.-battle of Charleston, Mo. Gen, Fremont's despatch. St. Louis, August 20, 1861. To Colonel E. D. Townsend:-- Report from commanding officer at Cairo says that Col. Dougherty, with three hundred men, sent out yesterday at seven o'clock from Bird's Point, attacked the enemy at Charleston, one thousand two hundred strong, drove him back, killed forty, took seventeen prisoners, fifteen horses, and returned at two o'clock this morning to Bird's Point, with a loss of one killed and six wounded. Col. Dougherty, Capt. Johnson, and Lieut.-Col. Ransom are among the wounded. Our forces under Gen. Prentiss are operating from Ironton in the direction of Hardee. J. O. Fremont, Major-General Commanding. St. Louis Democrat account. camp Lyon, August 20, 1861, Tuesday, 10 o'clock A. M. The rear-guard of the victorious Twenty-second Illinois have just returned to camp, under command of Capt. Abbott. We now foot up our entire loss: killed--Capt. William Sharp, Compan
Bird's Point, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 220
commanding officer at Cairo says that Col. Dougherty, with three hundred men, sent out yesterday at seven o'clock from Bird's Point, attacked the enemy at Charleston, one thousand two hundred strong, drove him back, killed forty, took seventeen prisoners, fifteen horses, and returned at two o'clock this morning to Bird's Point, with a loss of one killed and six wounded. Col. Dougherty, Capt. Johnson, and Lieut.-Col. Ransom are among the wounded. Our forces under Gen. Prentiss are operating frn was ordered to remain with his command, and the rest of us seated ourselves upon the cars, and moved proudly back to Bird's Point, which we reached in. good time, and without accident. We killed about sixty or seventy of the enemy, and probably wokilled and several wounded of the Union forces. A total rout of the rebels took place, and Col. Dougherty returned to Bird's Point this morning with fifteen prisoners and eighteen horses and many other trophies of war. The two companies of the Illin
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 220
ies of war. The two companies of the Illinois Twelfth failed to take the right road, and were not in the fight. The Union forces engaged did not exceed two hundred. The rebel prisoners represent seven different companies, and from the report they give of their respective companies, show their forces to have exceeded five hundred; some of them say they were two thousand strong, but this is thought exaggeration. They were badly uniformed, and Were armed with muskets, shot-guns, rifles, and Arkansas tooth-picks, with a few revolvers. I omitted to state that Lieut.-Col. Ransom was among the wounded on the Union side. He was urging his men to the charge, when a man rode up and called out: What do you mean? You are killing our own men. Ransom replied: I know what I am doing; who are you? The reply was, I am for Jeff. Davis. Ransom replied: You are the man I am after, and instantly two pistols were drawn. The rebel fired first, taking effect in Col. Ransom's arm, near the shoulder
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 220
sterday at seven o'clock from Bird's Point, attacked the enemy at Charleston, one thousand two hundred strong, drove him back, killed forty, tay morning that the enemy were assembled in considerable force at Charleston, Capt. Abbott and a portion of his command were sent out in the fvent the enemy from burning the trestle-work on the railroad near Charleston. He encamped within one mile and a half of the town, and passed ty. He was informed by Capt. Abbott that the enemy's strength at Charleston was 1,000, and also that he had received reliable information thawould make an attack upon him that night. We are going to take Charleston to-night, replied Col. Dougherty. You stay here, and engage the etole away from their companies to share what might be coming, for Charleston. The train carried our little band to the destroyed bridge, about four miles from Charleston. Here they were reinforced by two companies of the Illinois Eighteenth regiment, and commenced their march at
Charleston, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 220
orning! The prisoners look bad. About one-third of them appear intelligent — the balance have about half sense, and have certainly been induced to take up arms against their Government by the misrepresentations of the designing. N. Y. Tribune account. Cairo, Ill, August 20, 1861. Times are somewhat exciting here to-day. Our boys are at work, and were well paid for their labor last night and to-day. It has been known for several days that the secessionists were occupying Charleston, Missouri. Yesterday, about four o'clock P. M., Colonel Dougherty of the Twenty-second regiment Illinois Volunteers, and Lieut.-Col. Ransom of the Eleventh Illinois Volunteers, started on the Cairo and Fulton Railroad with two full companies, A and B, of the Illinois Twenty second, and some thirty or forty of the anxious boys for fight, who stole away from their companies to share what might be coming, for Charleston. The train carried our little band to the destroyed bridge, about four m
Claiborne F. Jackson (search for this): chapter 220
house the enemy were to be seen fleeing in the dim distance. We leisurely retraced our steps. At the railroad track we met the detached portion of our regiment, under Lieut.-Col. Hart. They had passed straight forward without turning off, and were just returning to our assistance. They had fallen in with the flying enemy, and killed sixteen of them. All returned to Capt. Abbott's encampment with twenty-one horses and eighteen prisoners, having been less than two hours absent. Here Capt. Jackson was ordered to remain with his command, and the rest of us seated ourselves upon the cars, and moved proudly back to Bird's Point, which we reached in. good time, and without accident. We killed about sixty or seventy of the enemy, and probably wounded twice that number. There were some fearful contests — some hand-to-hand fighting. The enemy were impaled upon the bayonet, pulled from their horses, knocked over with the butt of the gun or of the pistol, and so bold and impetuous was e
. Prentiss are operating from Ironton in the direction of Hardee. J. O. Fremont, Major-General Commanding. St. Louis Democrat account. camp Lyon, August 20, 1861, Tuesday, 10 o'clock A. M. The rear-guard of the victorious Twenty-second Illinois have just returned to camp, under command of Capt. Abbott. We now foot up our entire loss: killed--Capt. William Sharp, Company A. Wounded--Lieutenant-Colonel Ransom, slightly, in the shoulder; Capt. Johnson, slightly, in the leg; Private Schumacher, severely, in the arm; and five others of Company A, slightly wounded. The stroke was a bold and decisive one. Information having been received on Monday morning that the enemy were assembled in considerable force at Charleston, Capt. Abbott and a portion of his command were sent out in the fore part of the day for the purpose of reconnoissance, and also to prevent the enemy from burning the trestle-work on the railroad near Charleston. He encamped within one mile and a half of th
y, took seventeen prisoners, fifteen horses, and returned at two o'clock this morning to Bird's Point, with a loss of one killed and six wounded. Col. Dougherty, Capt. Johnson, and Lieut.-Col. Ransom are among the wounded. Our forces under Gen. Prentiss are operating from Ironton in the direction of Hardee. J. O. Fremont, Major-General Commanding. St. Louis Democrat account. camp Lyon, August 20, 1861, Tuesday, 10 o'clock A. M. The rear-guard of the victorious Twenty-second Illi Capt. Noleman had only about forty men under his command at the time. The victory is complete. The prisoners were brought to this place this evening, and sent to the guard-house by Col. Oglesby, who commands at this point in the absence of Gen. Prentiss. We have here about sixty prisoners and a greater number of horses. The horses are said to be good ones, but the prisoners, from their looks, will have more to eat than they have been accustomed to, but they will have to perform labor on th
E. D. Townsend (search for this): chapter 220
Doc. 195.-battle of Charleston, Mo. Gen, Fremont's despatch. St. Louis, August 20, 1861. To Colonel E. D. Townsend:-- Report from commanding officer at Cairo says that Col. Dougherty, with three hundred men, sent out yesterday at seven o'clock from Bird's Point, attacked the enemy at Charleston, one thousand two hundred strong, drove him back, killed forty, took seventeen prisoners, fifteen horses, and returned at two o'clock this morning to Bird's Point, with a loss of one killed and six wounded. Col. Dougherty, Capt. Johnson, and Lieut.-Col. Ransom are among the wounded. Our forces under Gen. Prentiss are operating from Ironton in the direction of Hardee. J. O. Fremont, Major-General Commanding. St. Louis Democrat account. camp Lyon, August 20, 1861, Tuesday, 10 o'clock A. M. The rear-guard of the victorious Twenty-second Illinois have just returned to camp, under command of Capt. Abbott. We now foot up our entire loss: killed--Capt. William Sharp, Company
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