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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Benjamin F. Johnson (search for this): chapter 15
Col. Hampton, upon having his horse shot from under him, seized a rifle, and said, Watch me, boys; do as I do. He then shot down successively several of the Federal officers who were leading their forces against him. Gen. Beauregard then came up, and said, Take that battery. Just at that moment the flag of the legion was shot down. Beauregard said, Hand it to me; let me bear the Palmetto flag. He did bear it in the fury of the fight. Col. Johnson, of the legion, was slain in the charge. The Hampton Legion promised to defend the flag presented to them by the ladies of the Palmetto State while one of them remained to step the field of conflict. That this promise will be sacredly redeemed, no one will doubt, when he comes to learn that of the eight hundred who went into the field on Sunday, one hundred and ten sealed their fidelity with their blood, that being the number of their killed and wounded, according to the unofficial reports.--Richmond Whig, July 24.
Toutan Beauregard (search for this): chapter 15
Col. Hampton, upon having his horse shot from under him, seized a rifle, and said, Watch me, boys; do as I do. He then shot down successively several of the Federal officers who were leading their forces against him. Gen. Beauregard then came up, and said, Take that battery. Just at that moment the flag of the legion was shot down. Beauregard said, Hand it to me; let me bear the Palmetto flag. He did bear it in the fury of the fight. Col. Johnson, of the legion, was slain in the chargeBeauregard said, Hand it to me; let me bear the Palmetto flag. He did bear it in the fury of the fight. Col. Johnson, of the legion, was slain in the charge. The Hampton Legion promised to defend the flag presented to them by the ladies of the Palmetto State while one of them remained to step the field of conflict. That this promise will be sacredly redeemed, no one will doubt, when he comes to learn that of the eight hundred who went into the field on Sunday, one hundred and ten sealed their fidelity with their blood, that being the number of their killed and wounded, according to the unofficial reports.--Richmond Whig, July 24.
Wade Hampton (search for this): chapter 15
Col. Hampton, upon having his horse shot from under him, seized a rifle, and said, Watch me, boys; do as I do. He then shot down successively several of the Federal officers who were leading their forces against him. Gen. Beauregard then came up, and said, Take that battery. Just at that moment the flag of the legion was shot down. Beauregard said, Hand it to me; let me bear the Palmetto flag. He did bear it in the fury of the fight. Col. Johnson, of the legion, was slain in the charge. The Hampton Legion promised to defend the flag presented to them by the ladies of the Palmetto State while one of them remained to step the field of conflict. That this promise will be sacredly redeemed, no one will doubt, when he comes to learn that of the eight hundred who went into the field on Sunday, one hundred and ten sealed their fidelity with their blood, that being the number of their killed and wounded, according to the unofficial reports.--Richmond Whig, July 24.
Col. Hampton, upon having his horse shot from under him, seized a rifle, and said, Watch me, boys; do as I do. He then shot down successively several of the Federal officers who were leading their forces against him. Gen. Beauregard then came up, and said, Take that battery. Just at that moment the flag of the legion was shot down. Beauregard said, Hand it to me; let me bear the Palmetto flag. He did bear it in the fury of the fight. Col. Johnson, of the legion, was slain in the charge. The Hampton Legion promised to defend the flag presented to them by the ladies of the Palmetto State while one of them remained to step the field of conflict. That this promise will be sacredly redeemed, no one will doubt, when he comes to learn that of the eight hundred who went into the field on Sunday, one hundred and ten sealed their fidelity with their blood, that being the number of their killed and wounded, according to the unofficial reports.--Richmond Whig, July 24.