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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 9 total hits in 3 results.

Knoxville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
tements of this brave eye-witness confirmed in the main the details of this great victory which we have received by the press and by the telegraph — a victory which has no precedent for completeness in the annals of war. Captain Wilson's narration moved the audience to alternate shouts of enthusiasm and tears of joy, as he graphically depicted either the noble conduct and gallant deeds of the brave defenders of Southern in dependence, and the almost incredible feats of the routed Yankees in making their escape from the field. He confirmed the statements of the small loss reported on our side, the immense slaughter of the Lincoln troops, and the great capture of arms, munitions, and prisoners made by our troops. Captain W. was followed by a gentleman whose name we did not learn, but who was a chaplain in the Confederate army, just from Richmond, and who confirmed the captain's statements. The train moved off while the reverend gentleman was speaking.--Knoxville (Tenn.) Register.
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
Speech from A wounded rebel.--The train from the East brought down Captain Wilson, of Atlanta, one of the wounded on the glorious battle-field of Manassas. Captain Wilson was in the whole of the hard-fought battle of the 21st, was wounded in the heel while on horseback, and received a contusion on the left shoulder from a cannon ball, which paralyzed his arm. Notwithstanding his sufferings from the pain of his wounds, he appeared on the platform of the cars, in response to the calls of the eager crowd assembled, and gave a glowing and eloquent description of the fight in which he had so gallantly participated. The statements of this brave eye-witness confirmed in the main the details of this great victory which we have received by the press and by the telegraph — a victory which has no precedent for completeness in the annals of war. Captain Wilson's narration moved the audience to alternate shouts of enthusiasm and tears of joy, as he graphically depicted either the noble condu
George P. Wilson (search for this): chapter 36
Speech from A wounded rebel.--The train from the East brought down Captain Wilson, of Atlanta, one of the wounded on the glorious battle-field of Manassas. Captain Wilson was in the whole of the hard-fought battle of the 21st, was wounded in the heel while on horseback, and received a contusion on the left shoulder from a canCaptain Wilson was in the whole of the hard-fought battle of the 21st, was wounded in the heel while on horseback, and received a contusion on the left shoulder from a cannon ball, which paralyzed his arm. Notwithstanding his sufferings from the pain of his wounds, he appeared on the platform of the cars, in response to the calls of the eager crowd assembled, and gave a glowing and eloquent description of the fight in which he had so gallantly participated. The statements of this brave eye-witnesstails of this great victory which we have received by the press and by the telegraph — a victory which has no precedent for completeness in the annals of war. Captain Wilson's narration moved the audience to alternate shouts of enthusiasm and tears of joy, as he graphically depicted either the noble conduct and gallant deeds of th