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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Wheeling, W. Va. (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 42
The Shriver Grays. --A company with this designation, from the city of Wheeling, took part in the hottest of the battle at Manassas on the 21st inst. This company was formed at Wheeling in May, when the enemy's troops were collecting at that place, and made its way, in small detachments, almost from within the enemy's lines, to Harper's Ferry. Being attached to the Twenty-seventh regiment of Virginia Volunteers, forming part of tile brigade of General Jackson, in General Johnston's army, thWheeling in May, when the enemy's troops were collecting at that place, and made its way, in small detachments, almost from within the enemy's lines, to Harper's Ferry. Being attached to the Twenty-seventh regiment of Virginia Volunteers, forming part of tile brigade of General Jackson, in General Johnston's army, the company has shared in much severe service with credit to itself, and finally, at Manassas, proved itself equal to the rest of our heroes in the desperate struggle of the left wing. The officers, Captain Daniel M. Shriver, First Lieutenant John S. Mitchell, and Second Lieutenant John B. Lady, led with great gallantry, and the men followed with the determined courage of veterans in a successful charge of their regiment and others on one of the enemy's batteries, after sustaining for hours a sto
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 42
The Shriver Grays. --A company with this designation, from the city of Wheeling, took part in the hottest of the battle at Manassas on the 21st inst. This company was formed at Wheeling in May, when the enemy's troops were collecting at that place, and made its way, in small detachments, almost from within the enemy's lines, to Harper's Ferry. Being attached to the Twenty-seventh regiment of Virginia Volunteers, forming part of tile brigade of General Jackson, in General Johnston's army, the company has shared in much severe service with credit to itself, and finally, at Manassas, proved itself equal to the rest of our heroes in the desperate struggle of the left wing. The officers, Captain Daniel M. Shriver, First Lieutenant John S. Mitchell, and Second Lieutenant John B. Lady, led with great gallantry, and the men followed with the determined courage of veterans in a successful charge of their regiment and others on one of the enemy's batteries, after sustaining for hours a sto
Second Lieutenant John B. Lady, led with great gallantry, and the men followed with the determined courage of veterans in a successful charge of their regiment and others on one of the enemy's batteries, after sustaining for hours a storm of shot and shell in supporting one of our batteries. The loss of the company was two killed, Sergeant George P. Wilson and John Fry, (son of Judge J. L. Fry,) two it is feared mortally wounded, William Quarrier and John Sweeny, sen., and seven others wounded, but not dangerously. Among the latter is Lieutenant Lady, who, with private Frederick, also wounded, is now in the city, well cared for in a benevolent family. They have each a painful flesh wound in the shoulder. The wounds of others are slight. Messrs. Fry and Quarrier were young lawyers of fine promise. Capt. Shriver, a young gentleman of fortune, has displayed as much gallantry in leading his men as lie had displayed liberality and energy in raising the company.--Richmond Enquirer.
Shriver Grays (search for this): chapter 42
The Shriver Grays. --A company with this designation, from the city of Wheeling, took part in the hottest of the battle at Manassas on the 21st inst. This company was formed at Wheeling in May, when the enemy's troops were collecting at that place, and made its way, in small detachments, almost from within the enemy's lines, to Harper's Ferry. Being attached to the Twenty-seventh regiment of Virginia Volunteers, forming part of tile brigade of General Jackson, in General Johnston's army, the company has shared in much severe service with credit to itself, and finally, at Manassas, proved itself equal to the rest of our heroes in the desperate struggle of the left wing. The officers, Captain Daniel M. Shriver, First Lieutenant John S. Mitchell, and Second Lieutenant John B. Lady, led with great gallantry, and the men followed with the determined courage of veterans in a successful charge of their regiment and others on one of the enemy's batteries, after sustaining for hours a st
George P. Wilson (search for this): chapter 42
l to the rest of our heroes in the desperate struggle of the left wing. The officers, Captain Daniel M. Shriver, First Lieutenant John S. Mitchell, and Second Lieutenant John B. Lady, led with great gallantry, and the men followed with the determined courage of veterans in a successful charge of their regiment and others on one of the enemy's batteries, after sustaining for hours a storm of shot and shell in supporting one of our batteries. The loss of the company was two killed, Sergeant George P. Wilson and John Fry, (son of Judge J. L. Fry,) two it is feared mortally wounded, William Quarrier and John Sweeny, sen., and seven others wounded, but not dangerously. Among the latter is Lieutenant Lady, who, with private Frederick, also wounded, is now in the city, well cared for in a benevolent family. They have each a painful flesh wound in the shoulder. The wounds of others are slight. Messrs. Fry and Quarrier were young lawyers of fine promise. Capt. Shriver, a young gentleman
Daniel M. Shriver (search for this): chapter 42
Jackson, in General Johnston's army, the company has shared in much severe service with credit to itself, and finally, at Manassas, proved itself equal to the rest of our heroes in the desperate struggle of the left wing. The officers, Captain Daniel M. Shriver, First Lieutenant John S. Mitchell, and Second Lieutenant John B. Lady, led with great gallantry, and the men followed with the determined courage of veterans in a successful charge of their regiment and others on one of the enemy's bat, but not dangerously. Among the latter is Lieutenant Lady, who, with private Frederick, also wounded, is now in the city, well cared for in a benevolent family. They have each a painful flesh wound in the shoulder. The wounds of others are slight. Messrs. Fry and Quarrier were young lawyers of fine promise. Capt. Shriver, a young gentleman of fortune, has displayed as much gallantry in leading his men as lie had displayed liberality and energy in raising the company.--Richmond Enquirer.
John Sweeny (search for this): chapter 42
irst Lieutenant John S. Mitchell, and Second Lieutenant John B. Lady, led with great gallantry, and the men followed with the determined courage of veterans in a successful charge of their regiment and others on one of the enemy's batteries, after sustaining for hours a storm of shot and shell in supporting one of our batteries. The loss of the company was two killed, Sergeant George P. Wilson and John Fry, (son of Judge J. L. Fry,) two it is feared mortally wounded, William Quarrier and John Sweeny, sen., and seven others wounded, but not dangerously. Among the latter is Lieutenant Lady, who, with private Frederick, also wounded, is now in the city, well cared for in a benevolent family. They have each a painful flesh wound in the shoulder. The wounds of others are slight. Messrs. Fry and Quarrier were young lawyers of fine promise. Capt. Shriver, a young gentleman of fortune, has displayed as much gallantry in leading his men as lie had displayed liberality and energy in raisi
John B. Lady (search for this): chapter 42
severe service with credit to itself, and finally, at Manassas, proved itself equal to the rest of our heroes in the desperate struggle of the left wing. The officers, Captain Daniel M. Shriver, First Lieutenant John S. Mitchell, and Second Lieutenant John B. Lady, led with great gallantry, and the men followed with the determined courage of veterans in a successful charge of their regiment and others on one of the enemy's batteries, after sustaining for hours a storm of shot and shell in suppos of the company was two killed, Sergeant George P. Wilson and John Fry, (son of Judge J. L. Fry,) two it is feared mortally wounded, William Quarrier and John Sweeny, sen., and seven others wounded, but not dangerously. Among the latter is Lieutenant Lady, who, with private Frederick, also wounded, is now in the city, well cared for in a benevolent family. They have each a painful flesh wound in the shoulder. The wounds of others are slight. Messrs. Fry and Quarrier were young lawyers of f
heroes in the desperate struggle of the left wing. The officers, Captain Daniel M. Shriver, First Lieutenant John S. Mitchell, and Second Lieutenant John B. Lady, led with great gallantry, and the men followed with the determined courage of veterans in a successful charge of their regiment and others on one of the enemy's batteries, after sustaining for hours a storm of shot and shell in supporting one of our batteries. The loss of the company was two killed, Sergeant George P. Wilson and John Fry, (son of Judge J. L. Fry,) two it is feared mortally wounded, William Quarrier and John Sweeny, sen., and seven others wounded, but not dangerously. Among the latter is Lieutenant Lady, who, with private Frederick, also wounded, is now in the city, well cared for in a benevolent family. They have each a painful flesh wound in the shoulder. The wounds of others are slight. Messrs. Fry and Quarrier were young lawyers of fine promise. Capt. Shriver, a young gentleman of fortune, has displ
The Shriver Grays. --A company with this designation, from the city of Wheeling, took part in the hottest of the battle at Manassas on the 21st inst. This company was formed at Wheeling in May, when the enemy's troops were collecting at that place, and made its way, in small detachments, almost from within the enemy's lines, to Harper's Ferry. Being attached to the Twenty-seventh regiment of Virginia Volunteers, forming part of tile brigade of General Jackson, in General Johnston's army, the company has shared in much severe service with credit to itself, and finally, at Manassas, proved itself equal to the rest of our heroes in the desperate struggle of the left wing. The officers, Captain Daniel M. Shriver, First Lieutenant John S. Mitchell, and Second Lieutenant John B. Lady, led with great gallantry, and the men followed with the determined courage of veterans in a successful charge of their regiment and others on one of the enemy's batteries, after sustaining for hours a sto
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