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Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 64
ateur by profession, arrived here to-night by the 6 o'clock Alexandria boat, from Manassas Junction, via Richmond and Fredericksburg. His story is so interesting that we give it with unusual fulness. Mr. Bing went over to Bull Run on the morning nce to recognize him would be to recognize his Government. On Monday night Mr. Bing left Richmond by the train for Fredericksburg. The conductor was not satisfied with Beauregard's pass not countersigned, but the documents certifying that he was a bearer of British despatches, silenced his scruples. With a letter from the British Consul to the Vice-Consul at Fredericksburg, he reached the latter town unmolested. The Vice-Consul gave him a letter to Capt. Lynch, in command of the rebel fooldier swore that he had seen him on board a Federal ship, and denounced him as a spy. Where-upon he was sent back to Fredericksburg for examination. There he was in imminent danger from a fourth mob that gathered about him, some one having reported
Maine (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 64
were butchered; but the theme is sickening. For the sake of humanity, of common decency, let us hope. that this barbarity was limited and local, and was condemned by the commanders. We since know, that after the battle they did take care of our wounded, and treat them well: let all justice be done. Almost every man we tallied with belonged to a different regiment from the last. They were chiefly from Rhode Island, Connecticut, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin--I did not see any soldiers from Maine--New Hampshire, Vermont, New York, or Pennsylvania; but of course I speak only of our part of the road. Their accounts seemed to harmonize, especially in two points, namely, that our men held their ground sturdily until three o'clock; and whenever they came in actual contact with the rebels, they drove them back; and secondly, that many of our officers were grossly inefficient, and some evidently showed the white feather. Orders seemed to be scarce; the men fought on their own hook. Sever
Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 64
ck Alexandria boat, from Manassas Junction, via Richmond and Fredericksburg. His story is so interesting that we give it with unusual fulness. Mr. Bing went over to Bull Run on the morning of the battle in a carriage with Senator Foster of Connecticut, and Representative Ely of New York. In the melee of the retreat, he became separated from his companions, and was making his way through the woods when he came suddenly upon a party of rebel soldiers, who took him prisoner. Luckily he soos. We since know, that after the battle they did take care of our wounded, and treat them well: let all justice be done. Almost every man we tallied with belonged to a different regiment from the last. They were chiefly from Rhode Island, Connecticut, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin--I did not see any soldiers from Maine--New Hampshire, Vermont, New York, or Pennsylvania; but of course I speak only of our part of the road. Their accounts seemed to harmonize, especially in two points, namely, th
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 64
ery strong position, quite as strong naturally as by art. It is a heath, somewhat like the steppes of Russia, bounded by hills, swamps, small streams, and hedged by dense woods. From Bull Run towards Manassas, the facilities for defence grow more formidable. The whole position is almost impregnable. The whole number of troops in Virginia does not exceed 70,000. Only some 4,000 or 5,000 of these are at Richmond. Reinforcements reach there to the extent of several hundred daily. Two Mississippi regiments have arrived within the last ten days, made up of Southern gentlemen, disciplined, and splendid in equipment. Immediately about the city there are no important intrenchments. With a few guns in position there, and the masked batteries on all sides, the people feel secure. There are several strong batteries at Acquia Creek, and the force there is rapidly increasing. Both at Manassas and Richmond the talk was that a strong force will be concentrated at some point or points o
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 64
o those traitorous masters, to be used behind other batteries for mowing down the soldiers of the Union? The tone of the question was slightly warmed, I imagine, by what the Senator had seen at Bull Run. Allusion was made to the Senator from Kentucky, who had demanded the yeas and nays, and a small shot was fired toward him. Mr. President, said the ex-leader and candidate, rising with great assumption of calm dignity, the Senator from Massachusetts will of course do his duty as he understands it. I, sir, as a Senator from Kentucky, shall endeavor to do mine. [Resumes his seat and the newspaper, which he turns over somewhat conspicuously toward the gentleman on the other side of the house. ] Pearce speaks, half-way, for Maryland. Mr. Clerk Forney presently calls the vote; Trumball, Sumner, Wilson, and others, responding an emphatic Ay; and the chairman remarks that the bill is passed --six Senators voting No. Mr. Tennessee Johnston then postponing his speech, we looked into t
Gordonsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 64
casually remarked that some time since, and not long after a British subject left Richmond, the Federal War Department received the most correct intelligence it had ever had, touching the numbers and disposition of the Southern forces. [Query.--How did the rebel officer know what the War Department received?] Finally, on Wednesday night Mr. Bing started in charge of a railroad conductor, who frequently reminded him that he carried a revolver. The only incident of the journey was at Gordonsville, the junction of the Orange and Alexandria and Virginia Central Railroad. Here three several mobs, inspired by three different causes, gathered about the traveller in succession. The first, learning that he had breakfasted with Beauregard, who had hospitably entertained him during his stay, took him for a friend of the general, and insisted upon a narrative of the battle. The second, learning that he was a prisoner, were possessed with a desire to examine a Yankee, and some were fo
Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 64
f these sad incidents, showing how disabled and wounded men were butchered; but the theme is sickening. For the sake of humanity, of common decency, let us hope. that this barbarity was limited and local, and was condemned by the commanders. We since know, that after the battle they did take care of our wounded, and treat them well: let all justice be done. Almost every man we tallied with belonged to a different regiment from the last. They were chiefly from Rhode Island, Connecticut, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin--I did not see any soldiers from Maine--New Hampshire, Vermont, New York, or Pennsylvania; but of course I speak only of our part of the road. Their accounts seemed to harmonize, especially in two points, namely, that our men held their ground sturdily until three o'clock; and whenever they came in actual contact with the rebels, they drove them back; and secondly, that many of our officers were grossly inefficient, and some evidently showed the white feather. Orders se
Russia (Russia) (search for this): chapter 64
and trustworthy person, who has had recent opportunity of seeing and hearing whereof he affirms. Beauregard's force at Bull Run was 27,000, which was increased by 8,000 of Johnson's the day before, and by 5,000 more during the engagement. This statement is confirmed from an independent and trustworthy source. Davis did not assist on the field until late in the afternoon. Manassas is a very strong position, quite as strong naturally as by art. It is a heath, somewhat like the steppes of Russia, bounded by hills, swamps, small streams, and hedged by dense woods. From Bull Run towards Manassas, the facilities for defence grow more formidable. The whole position is almost impregnable. The whole number of troops in Virginia does not exceed 70,000. Only some 4,000 or 5,000 of these are at Richmond. Reinforcements reach there to the extent of several hundred daily. Two Mississippi regiments have arrived within the last ten days, made up of Southern gentlemen, disciplined, and sp
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 64
Mr. Julius Bing's Adventures. Washington, Thursday, Aug. 1, 1861. Mr. Julius Bing, a German by birth, a British subject by naturalizch questions as had been put him by inferior officers, respecting Washington and the national army, might in future be asked, to which BeauregCourt, stands right opposite the Court House, on the main road to Washington. The teatable was still uncleared, and cold meat yet remained fobe more comfortable than in the day-time; beside, I want to reach Washington early, and we can catch the seven o'clock boat from Alexandria. mmenced just as we reached the seven o'clock (the first) boat for Washington. So we were not only among the last from the regulated panic, but were with the first soldiers who reached Washington by this route. (The Arlington and Long Bridge road diverges some miles from Alexandria.ue; but how easily such a thing could have been done! My loyal Washington friend's suggestion of the good moral effect which our Seventh Re
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 64
s aides, but is now colonel of an Alabama regiment, and in some position on Gen. Beauregard's staff, and Major McLean of Maryland. They promised him an early presentation at Headquarters, but he was taken to the Junction in a wagon with other pris talk was that a strong force will be concentrated at some point or points on the Lower Potomac, and a descent made into Maryland. They boast that they already have a large number of boats collected at Acquia Creek and the White House for this purporated by information received at the Navy Department to-day. The rebels expect strong cooperation from their friends in Maryland. It is understood that Beauregard clamors for permission to make an immediate advance, to which Davis is strongly opphe turns over somewhat conspicuously toward the gentleman on the other side of the house. ] Pearce speaks, half-way, for Maryland. Mr. Clerk Forney presently calls the vote; Trumball, Sumner, Wilson, and others, responding an emphatic Ay; and the cha
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