hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Washington (United States) 145 1 Browse Search
Maryland (Maryland, United States) 122 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis 106 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 96 0 Browse Search
Winfield Scott 66 0 Browse Search
Toutan Beauregard 64 2 Browse Search
Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) 62 0 Browse Search
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) 56 0 Browse Search
Abe Lincoln 40 0 Browse Search
Johnston 38 8 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 107 total hits in 34 results.

1 2 3 4
Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 65
turn of fugitive slaves by our troops to disloyal owners. What! said Senator Wilson; shall we take these men who have been used to dig intrenchments. for masked batteries, behind which their traitorous masters are posted to murder our true loyal defenders — shall we force these poor men back to those traitorous masters, to be used behind other batteries for mowing down the soldiers of the Union? The tone of the question was slightly warmed, I imagine, by what the Senator had seen at Bull Run. Allusion was made to the Senator from Kentucky, who had demanded the yeas and nays, and a small shot was fired toward him. Mr. President, said the ex-leader and candidate, rising with great assumption of calm dignity, the Senator from Massachusetts will of course do his duty as he understands it. I, sir, as a Senator from Kentucky, shall endeavor to do mine. [Resumes his seat and the newspaper, which he turns over somewhat conspicuously toward the gentleman on the other side of the ho
Fort Ellsworth (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 65
all the way; and we took some extra exercise, chasing a bullock or two, straying off into the woods. I think we saved our Uncle Samuel one stout animal, and fairly earned a beefsteak, which is hereby freely waived in behalf of privates A and B, who are probably as hungry as we. As day dawned, we caine up with a female equestrian, probably a nurse, who walked her horse leisurely by the wagons. Soon we observed camps near the road, over which waved the Stars and Stripes; the ramparts of Fort Ellsworth on a hill commanding the road into Alexandria, were occupied by men, busy apparently in placing their guns in range; and at the outer picket near the town, another platoon from the garrison were arguing the point with fugitive soldiers who were asking admittance. Even at this time only the wagons and the disabled men seemed to be allowed to pass: able-bodied soldiers were very properly stopped outside. Our pass was promptly honored as usual. At the first chance for a cup of coffee — a
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 65
o those traitorous masters, to be used behind other batteries for mowing down the soldiers of the Union? The tone of the question was slightly warmed, I imagine, by what the Senator had seen at Bull Run. Allusion was made to the Senator from Kentucky, who had demanded the yeas and nays, and a small shot was fired toward him. Mr. President, said the ex-leader and candidate, rising with great assumption of calm dignity, the Senator from Massachusetts will of course do his duty as he understands it. I, sir, as a Senator from Kentucky, shall endeavor to do mine. [Resumes his seat and the newspaper, which he turns over somewhat conspicuously toward the gentleman on the other side of the house. ] Pearce speaks, half-way, for Maryland. Mr. Clerk Forney presently calls the vote; Trumball, Sumner, Wilson, and others, responding an emphatic Ay; and the chairman remarks that the bill is passed --six Senators voting No. Mr. Tennessee Johnston then postponing his speech, we looked into t
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 65
from Kentucky, who had demanded the yeas and nays, and a small shot was fired toward him. Mr. President, said the ex-leader and candidate, rising with great assumption of calm dignity, the Senator from Massachusetts will of course do his duty as he understands it. I, sir, as a Senator from Kentucky, shall endeavor to do mine. [Resumes his seat and the newspaper, which he turns over somewhat conspicuously toward the gentleman on the other side of the house. ] Pearce speaks, half-way, for Maryland. Mr. Clerk Forney presently calls the vote; Trumball, Sumner, Wilson, and others, responding an emphatic Ay; and the chairman remarks that the bill is passed --six Senators voting No. Mr. Tennessee Johnston then postponing his speech, we looked into the House, found the seats as full as usual, and business proceeding; and so we adjourned to the cars, and soon whirled by our pickets, and passed the famous Junction, and the Relay House, and Federal Hill, and noted Pratt street; had a glimp
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 65
rom Massachusetts will of course do his duty as he understands it. I, sir, as a Senator from Kentucky, shall endeavor to do mine. [Resumes his seat and the newspaper, which he turns over somewhat conspicuously toward the gentleman on the other side of the house. ] Pearce speaks, half-way, for Maryland. Mr. Clerk Forney presently calls the vote; Trumball, Sumner, Wilson, and others, responding an emphatic Ay; and the chairman remarks that the bill is passed --six Senators voting No. Mr. Tennessee Johnston then postponing his speech, we looked into the House, found the seats as full as usual, and business proceeding; and so we adjourned to the cars, and soon whirled by our pickets, and passed the famous Junction, and the Relay House, and Federal Hill, and noted Pratt street; had a glimpse of Fort McHenry, (we had been told that the retreat would make a rise of a troublous tide in this region, but didn't see it,) and at half-past 10 were fairly pressed. into the densest of excited cr
West Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 65
sty, fagged defenders of their country's flag, and never doubting they had honestly done their best. Meanwhile, an army-wagon had been standing since we first met the panic in the same spot before this house. I note this particular wagon, lettered Co. H, 3d Regt., Me., because it is noteworthy that it stood in line in one place all these two hours; and the driver said, in answer to my question, that he should move on as soon as he had orders. As this is the regiment of Col. Howard, of West-Point, whom I (as one of those reception committees ) had learned to respect and admire in New York, I talked with the teamster about the doings of the day and of the Colonel, who was reported killed. During the brief panic, he had, like his neighbors, thrown overboard all his cargo, except five bags of oats. So, on these bags we persuaded him to spread six of the wounded soldiers, to be jolted over the road, in the absence of ambulances, which at this place at least were invisible. When he f
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 65
efenders — shall we force these poor men back to those traitorous masters, to be used behind other batteries for mowing down the soldiers of the Union? The tone of the question was slightly warmed, I imagine, by what the Senator had seen at Bull Run. Allusion was made to the Senator from Kentucky, who had demanded the yeas and nays, and a small shot was fired toward him. Mr. President, said the ex-leader and candidate, rising with great assumption of calm dignity, the Senator from Massachusetts will of course do his duty as he understands it. I, sir, as a Senator from Kentucky, shall endeavor to do mine. [Resumes his seat and the newspaper, which he turns over somewhat conspicuously toward the gentleman on the other side of the house. ] Pearce speaks, half-way, for Maryland. Mr. Clerk Forney presently calls the vote; Trumball, Sumner, Wilson, and others, responding an emphatic Ay; and the chairman remarks that the bill is passed --six Senators voting No. Mr. Tennessee Johns
Vermont (Vermont, United States) (search for this): chapter 65
theme is sickening. For the sake of humanity, of common decency, let us hope. that this barbarity was limited and local, and was condemned by the commanders. We since know, that after the battle they did take care of our wounded, and treat them well: let all justice be done. Almost every man we tallied with belonged to a different regiment from the last. They were chiefly from Rhode Island, Connecticut, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin--I did not see any soldiers from Maine--New Hampshire, Vermont, New York, or Pennsylvania; but of course I speak only of our part of the road. Their accounts seemed to harmonize, especially in two points, namely, that our men held their ground sturdily until three o'clock; and whenever they came in actual contact with the rebels, they drove them back; and secondly, that many of our officers were grossly inefficient, and some evidently showed the white feather. Orders seemed to be scarce; the men fought on their own hook. Several, however, spoke of t
Federal Hill (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 65
house. ] Pearce speaks, half-way, for Maryland. Mr. Clerk Forney presently calls the vote; Trumball, Sumner, Wilson, and others, responding an emphatic Ay; and the chairman remarks that the bill is passed --six Senators voting No. Mr. Tennessee Johnston then postponing his speech, we looked into the House, found the seats as full as usual, and business proceeding; and so we adjourned to the cars, and soon whirled by our pickets, and passed the famous Junction, and the Relay House, and Federal Hill, and noted Pratt street; had a glimpse of Fort McHenry, (we had been told that the retreat would make a rise of a troublous tide in this region, but didn't see it,) and at half-past 10 were fairly pressed. into the densest of excited crowds at the Philadelphia Continental. Is it true that we have twelve thousand killed, and our army all gone? etc. etc. * * * * * * * * * Next morning I was rather hoarse — but I felt the pulse of a splendid regiment in Chestnut street, bound for the c
Wisconsin (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 65
ts, showing how disabled and wounded men were butchered; but the theme is sickening. For the sake of humanity, of common decency, let us hope. that this barbarity was limited and local, and was condemned by the commanders. We since know, that after the battle they did take care of our wounded, and treat them well: let all justice be done. Almost every man we tallied with belonged to a different regiment from the last. They were chiefly from Rhode Island, Connecticut, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin--I did not see any soldiers from Maine--New Hampshire, Vermont, New York, or Pennsylvania; but of course I speak only of our part of the road. Their accounts seemed to harmonize, especially in two points, namely, that our men held their ground sturdily until three o'clock; and whenever they came in actual contact with the rebels, they drove them back; and secondly, that many of our officers were grossly inefficient, and some evidently showed the white feather. Orders seemed to be scarce;
1 2 3 4