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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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There is a story that Gen. Beauregard, in his anxiety to learn the plans of Gen. Scott previous to the battle of Bull Run, attached a wire to a telegraph of the Unionists which communicated with the Headquarters of the Department of the Potomac. The coating of this wire was of the color of dry leaves, or of a dead limb, not readily attracting notice. The early reports of the defeat mentioned that the rebels knew Gen. McDowell's programme beforehand. Perhaps it was in this way that they learned it, and that the final council of war, at midnight, was only one instant in reporting itself from one camp to another.--Independent.
Winfield Scott (search for this): chapter 75
There is a story that Gen. Beauregard, in his anxiety to learn the plans of Gen. Scott previous to the battle of Bull Run, attached a wire to a telegraph of the Unionists which communicated with the Headquarters of the Department of the Potomac. The coating of this wire was of the color of dry leaves, or of a dead limb, not readily attracting notice. The early reports of the defeat mentioned that the rebels knew Gen. McDowell's programme beforehand. Perhaps it was in this way that they learned it, and that the final council of war, at midnight, was only one instant in reporting itself from one camp to another.--Independent.
Goliath Beauregard (search for this): chapter 75
There is a story that Gen. Beauregard, in his anxiety to learn the plans of Gen. Scott previous to the battle of Bull Run, attached a wire to a telegraph of the Unionists which communicated with the Headquarters of the Department of the Potomac. The coating of this wire was of the color of dry leaves, or of a dead limb, not readily attracting notice. The early reports of the defeat mentioned that the rebels knew Gen. McDowell's programme beforehand. Perhaps it was in this way that they learned it, and that the final council of war, at midnight, was only one instant in reporting itself from one camp to another.--Independent.
There is a story that Gen. Beauregard, in his anxiety to learn the plans of Gen. Scott previous to the battle of Bull Run, attached a wire to a telegraph of the Unionists which communicated with the Headquarters of the Department of the Potomac. The coating of this wire was of the color of dry leaves, or of a dead limb, not readily attracting notice. The early reports of the defeat mentioned that the rebels knew Gen. McDowell's programme beforehand. Perhaps it was in this way that they learned it, and that the final council of war, at midnight, was only one instant in reporting itself from one camp to another.--Independent.