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Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 134
t as light. But it is being carried out, and this brings me to consider what are our duty and our interest. As to duty, that is clear from what I have already told you. We owe allegiance to the Government of the Union, and its history to the breaking out of the present foul rebellion, the memory of the men who gave it to us, the untold blessings it has conferred upon us, the support it has given to the cause of constitutional freedom everywhere, the gratitude we owe to Washington, whom Providence, it has been said, left childless, that his country might call him father, will all unite in making that allegiance a pleasure as well as a duty. To be false, to such a Government, to palter even with the treason that seeks its downfall, to associate with the wicked men or the madmen who are in arms against it, would be as vile a dishonor and as base a crime as fallen man ever perpetrated. Peace, in such a crisis — the cry of our opponents — how is it to be attained? How, upon their p
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 134
with the very purpose and express words of the Constitution, which declare that the Constitution, and the laws of the United States which shall be made in pursuance thereof, and all treaties made, or which shall be made under the authority of the UnUnited States, shall be the supreme law of the land, that is, of the whole land, whether under Territorial or State Government. Never, in human annals, did prejudice or ignorance before believe so preposterous a doctrine; and yet it is on this, andzing as it would a State as a party to such a conflict, would be to place her in the attitude of a belligerent to the United States, and justify other nations in so considering and treating her. The chief defect of the Articles of Confederation, whiHamilton was of the same opinion, and the result was the adoption of a system that made each citizen a citizen of the United States, bound to it, as to all their constitutional powers, by a direct and paramount allegiance, and subject, by reason of
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 134
e citizen who violates his country's laws plead immunity from punishment under the sanction of a foreign Power. The citizen is to claim exemption because others have offended with him. What is crime, conceded crime, in one or a few, ceases to be crime if many are committing it. It even then is supposed to rise to the dignity of a virtue. What folly! What absolute folly! Washington did not so hold when he raised and marched, leading it himself, an army to subdue and punish thousands in Pennsylvania in rebellion. Jackson did not so hold when he resolved to prostrate nullification by military power, though sought to be shielded by State authority. Congress did not so hold when it armed him with the whole force of the nation to effect that, his clear duty and patriotic purpose. But of this enough; the doctrine is so obviously untenable that patriotism instinctively rejects it. As no argument can even plausibly maintain it, no argument is required to refute it. Its absurdity is as
Harford (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 134
ut persistently denied, the consulting the will of the people of the State, on the very question of their disputed allegiance — in a report, ingeniously prepared, culling from the debates of the Convention which prepared the Constitution extracts of speeches by Hamilton, Madison, and others, without giving the context, or stating fairly and fully the very questions being discussed, sought to maintain the groundless, absurd theory. And, more recently, three respectable Peace gentlemen of Harford County have given it the sanction of their names. When the will is father to the thought, nothing is easier than to find reasons to uphold it. In every branch of science and of literature, general or political, this has been over and over again illustrated. The absurdity is first adopted from choice, without reflection, and the mind is at work at once to maintain it. Experience is rejected, the teachings of the wise are forgotten or disregarded, the very nature of things is repudiated, and th
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 134
trodden by the traitorous foe: no horrid clash of arms has startled our homes with dismay; no desolation is within our limits; no armed soldier is here but to protect and defend the loyal. Peace is our condition, and none of our people are subject to the hazards of the contest but those who are patriotically giving themselves to their country's service for their country's defence. What a contrast to the sad fate of our misguided sister, Virginia! Through folly and crime, the war which South Carolina traitorously initiated she has brought almost exclusively within her borders, and sad, afflictingly sad, is the result — private grief and misery, individual poverty, and State bankruptcy, and the loss of the renown won for her by her former generation of good and great men. Let her example strengthen us in the resolve to remain true to patriotic obligation. Let it teach us how dear to us should be the fame of our good and great of the same generation, and how imperative the demands,
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 134
wn to the Confederation, by this ridiculous, wholly ridiculous dogma, that States cannot be coerced. As well might the citizen who violates his country's laws plead immunity from punishment under the sanction of a foreign Power. The citizen is to claim exemption because others have offended with him. What is crime, conceded crime, in one or a few, ceases to be crime if many are committing it. It even then is supposed to rise to the dignity of a virtue. What folly! What absolute folly! Washington did not so hold when he raised and marched, leading it himself, an army to subdue and punish thousands in Pennsylvania in rebellion. Jackson did not so hold when he resolved to prostrate nullification by military power, though sought to be shielded by State authority. Congress did not so hold when it armed him with the whole force of the nation to effect that, his clear duty and patriotic purpose. But of this enough; the doctrine is so obviously untenable that patriotism instinctively
West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 134
the almost sacred standard which they were educated to defend, and bound by every motive of gratitude and by oft-repeated pledges to Heaven to defend to the last! Whilst Winfield Scott's memory will ever live, honored and revered by the good and the great of the world, every true soldier will try, for the sake of his profession, to forget that such men had belonged to it. Scott is gone, but the army has still a chief. Though new to fame, McClellan's repeated and rapid victories in Western Virginia, that so thrilled with joy every patriotic heart, and his untiring zeal, scientific attainments, and complete organization of his vast army, are guarantees on which the country may and will rely that the honor of the nation and the fame of the army are in safe hands. With such a leader, and such a cause, who can doubt the ultimate result? Sooner or later, we shall see the stars to sparkle from the sphere from which they have shot. We shall see treason crushed and the Union restored;
Baltimore (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 134
Doc. 130. speech of Reverdy Johnson, at a mass meeting of the Union citizens of Baltimore Co., at Calverton, Md., Nov. 4. Fellow-citizens of Baltimore County:--My failure to appear before you until the closing period of the canvass, I am sure, you will not attribute to any indifference to the momentous questions which it involves, or to a want of grateful sensibility for the honor of the nomination which your Union Convention, on the 12th of September, conferred upon me. Whilst these quesBaltimore County:--My failure to appear before you until the closing period of the canvass, I am sure, you will not attribute to any indifference to the momentous questions which it involves, or to a want of grateful sensibility for the honor of the nomination which your Union Convention, on the 12th of September, conferred upon me. Whilst these questions have almost engrossed my thoughts from their first appearance, that nomination advised me that those by whom it was made, and representing in that particular, as I supposed, your opinion, believed that I might be able to serve our State in her present exigency, and, by doing so constitutionally and loyally, assist the Government of the whole in its sworn duty to uphold its rightful authority by suppressing, through the use of all its delegated powers, the cruel, unprovoked rebellion which
Calverton, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 134
Doc. 130. speech of Reverdy Johnson, at a mass meeting of the Union citizens of Baltimore Co., at Calverton, Md., Nov. 4. Fellow-citizens of Baltimore County:--My failure to appear before you until the closing period of the canvass, I am sure, you will not attribute to any indifference to the momentous questions which it involves, or to a want of grateful sensibility for the honor of the nomination which your Union Convention, on the 12th of September, conferred upon me. Whilst these questions have almost engrossed my thoughts from their first appearance, that nomination advised me that those by whom it was made, and representing in that particular, as I supposed, your opinion, believed that I might be able to serve our State in her present exigency, and, by doing so constitutionally and loyally, assist the Government of the whole in its sworn duty to uphold its rightful authority by suppressing, through the use of all its delegated powers, the cruel, unprovoked rebellion which i
John Hamilton (search for this): chapter 134
denied, the consulting the will of the people of the State, on the very question of their disputed allegiance — in a report, ingeniously prepared, culling from the debates of the Convention which prepared the Constitution extracts of speeches by Hamilton, Madison, and others, without giving the context, or stating fairly and fully the very questions being discussed, sought to maintain the groundless, absurd theory. And, more recently, three respectable Peace gentlemen of Harford County have givn of the States containing such an ingredient, seemed to provide for its own destruction. He preferred the use of force upon the people individually, and not collectively, find expressed the hope that a system to that effect would be framed. Mr. Hamilton was of the same opinion, and the result was the adoption of a system that made each citizen a citizen of the United States, bound to it, as to all their constitutional powers, by a direct and paramount allegiance, and subject, by reason of it,
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