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Cairo, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 139
about the same number of wounded are in our hospitals. The enemy are reported to have one hundred and two of our men at Cairo, a large number taken from our hospital on the other side. Two gentlemen, residents of Austin, Texas, passed through Celd for some time, they were released, and after making their way through Canada came down through St. Louis, and were at Cairo on the 6th--the day of the battle. They report that transports were continually plying between this point and Cairo on tCairo on that day, full of dead and wounded, who were received and borne away from the boats at Cairo by the citizens. They further report that there are two gunboats finished at St. Louis, and six on the stocks. They bring a Chicago Tribune, which has the Cairo by the citizens. They further report that there are two gunboats finished at St. Louis, and six on the stocks. They bring a Chicago Tribune, which has the candor to say the battle on the 6th was terrible on both sides. In the midst of the battle our batteries were turned upon the gunboats, whenever they showed themselves around the bend above. It was plain that several of our balls from Major Stewar
Tappan's regiment, and the Watson battery, setting are to the tents and throwing their lines upon the banks of the river beneath which our men lay without ammunition. It is said that as the Lincolnites came upon the bank above them, our whole force, which lay but eight or ten yards off, had but three rounds of cartridges with which to receive them. Our men now retreated up the river to a point opposite the upper end of Columbus; here Colonel Carroll's Fifteenth (under Colonel Tyler, of San Juan notoriety) and Col. Mark's Eleventh Louisiana regiments were being landed, which forces reached the other side of the river between half-past 12 and two. At eleven o'clock A. M. orders were received for two companies of the first battalion Tennessee Cavalry, Colonel Logwood, to cross the river, and Captain Taylor's Memphis Light Dragoons and Captain White's Tennessee Mounted Rifles (being companies A and B, of the battalion) were detailed and marched under Colonel Logwood. In crossing t
Montgomery (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 139
on they were designed to occupy before the breaking of their column. Capt. White's Tennessee Mounted Rifles being first to move, had, however, gained the point where the enemy were to embark before they reached it in large numbers, and taking a position between the gunboats and the enemy's hospital, where they could not be shelled without the shots taking effect upon their own sick, they kept up a brisk fire upon them as they retreated past. Smith's and Carroll's regiments, and Taylor's, Montgomery's, and Bowles' Cavalry soon came up, and the havoc is said to have been frightful. As the enemy gained ground in the commencement of the engagement, they had kept a large number of wagons and ambulances engaged in carrying their dead and wounded off the field, and this will make it impossible for us ever to approximate the number of their killed and wounded. Besides, a galling fire was kept up upon them even after they had reached their transports, and as we crowded upon them every shot
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 139
mar was coming up the river, and the guns of the enemy being turned against her, she was compelled to fall back and postpone her landing. The batteries on this side of the river, however, kept up such an incessant firing that the enemy were compelled to retire from the river bank and take position farther back and within the cover of the woods. By this time our reinforcements had landed, and were drawn up in line of battle on the bank; Colonel Smith's First (One Hundred and Fifty-fourth) Tennessee regiment, and Colonel Blythe's Mississippi battalion, being in transit across the river. The falling back of the enemy from the river was the turning tide in the affairs of the day. Gen. Pillow, now at the head of Col. Tappan's, Freeman's, Pickett's, Wright's, Russell's, and Mark's Eleventh Louisiana regiments, attacked the enemy in three desperate charges between twelve and two o'clock, each time repulsed and rallied by General Pillow in person. Wherever the battle raged the fierce
Austin (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 139
, and 85 missing. A steamer, bearing a flag of truce, came to Columbus to-day, (Nov. 8,) bearing Mrs. Dougherty and other ladies, who came down to see their husbands, who are prisoners in our hands. We have one hundred prisoners in our possession who are uninjured, and about the same number of wounded are in our hospitals. The enemy are reported to have one hundred and two of our men at Cairo, a large number taken from our hospital on the other side. Two gentlemen, residents of Austin, Texas, passed through Columbus to-day, who were taken prisoners in New York on landing from a vessel from South America. After being held for some time, they were released, and after making their way through Canada came down through St. Louis, and were at Cairo on the 6th--the day of the battle. They report that transports were continually plying between this point and Cairo on that day, full of dead and wounded, who were received and borne away from the boats at Cairo by the citizens. They
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 139
ecover. I am afraid Jimmy Walker (James' son) will not recover. I think he is shot through the rectum. The day before the battle, Jackson, Major Butler, of the Eleventh Louisiana regiment, Wilson, of Watson's battery, Lieut. Ball, of same regiment, and Major Gus. Henry, and myself dined at Gen. Pillow's. Butler was shot through and died yesterday. Lieut. Ball was dangerously injured, and Henry had two horses shot under him. Jackson I have spoken of. I have given you but a poor account of what I saw, but I have not time to go more into details now, and I am out of kelter besides. You will see a full account in the papers of the fight. I wish the war would close. Such scenes as that of Thursday are sickening; and this destruction of life is so useless. I believe we shall have some terrible fighting very soon on the coast, in Virginia and in Kentucky. Much love to mother and sister when you see them. Mr. Law gave me the letter. I am your devoted son, Lunsford P. Yandell.
Columbus, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 139
the battle. Memphis appeal narrative. Columbus, Nov. 10, 1861. Thursday, the 7th day of NOrleans, though, more properly speaking, upon Columbus. Things had worn their wonted aspect of quiere seen landing troops some seven miles above Columbus, on the opposite side of the river, near Hunthe river to a point opposite the upper end of Columbus; here Colonel Carroll's Fifteenth (under Colo A steamer, bearing a flag of truce, came to Columbus to-day, (Nov. 8,) bearing Mrs. Dougherty and n, residents of Austin, Texas, passed through Columbus to-day, who were taken prisoners in New York on the Missouri side, about five miles above Columbus by land. Information of it was immediately bed and twenty-eight-pounder on the hill above Columbus, sending a few shots among the main body of t, while seventeen regiments were to move upon Columbus from the other side, and, making a simultaneoiscomfiture. L. P. Yandell's account. Columbus, November 10. My dear father: I know you h[3 more...]
Fort Hamilton (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 139
five steamboats, landed six or eight miles above us on the Missouri shore, and were seen to disembark infantry, artillery, and cavalry in large numbers. Troops were thrown across from our side of the river about eight or nine o'clock, and about eleven o'clock the battle commenced and raged till three or four o'clock P. M. The gunboats came down within range of our camp and commenced throwing shot and shell about eight o'clock. One or two shots fell inside our line--one piece near my tent. Hamilton's artillery replied to the boats, and they soon moved out of range, when Captain Stewart, with his Parrott guns, went two miles up the bluff and opened on the boats. Most of his guns threw over the boats, and the enemy's balls did not reach us. Adjutant Hammond and I were with Captain Stewart, and helped the men to place the guns in position a number of times. They were just going to fire one of the guns, when Hammond and I retired some ten or twelve yards. The gun was fired — the explosi
Canada (Canada) (search for this): chapter 139
one hundred prisoners in our possession who are uninjured, and about the same number of wounded are in our hospitals. The enemy are reported to have one hundred and two of our men at Cairo, a large number taken from our hospital on the other side. Two gentlemen, residents of Austin, Texas, passed through Columbus to-day, who were taken prisoners in New York on landing from a vessel from South America. After being held for some time, they were released, and after making their way through Canada came down through St. Louis, and were at Cairo on the 6th--the day of the battle. They report that transports were continually plying between this point and Cairo on that day, full of dead and wounded, who were received and borne away from the boats at Cairo by the citizens. They further report that there are two gunboats finished at St. Louis, and six on the stocks. They bring a Chicago Tribune, which has the candor to say the battle on the 6th was terrible on both sides. In the midst o
Fort Pillow (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 139
e meanwhile, General Cheatham brought over Marks', Russell's, and Carroll's regiments, and, with Pillow, renewed the fight. A flank movement was executed by Cheatham, in which Marks' Louisiana regime leaving us a full supply of them. The battle throughout was exceedingly fierce. The fire on Pillow's force in the first instance was tremendous. The Federals fought with unusual bravery. They wseven thousand infantry, four hundred and fifty cavalry, and I don't recollect their artillery. Pillow acted with great bravery. So did Polk and Cheatham, but they were not in the fight for several hours after Pillow. Pillow's escape is miraculous. Every one of his staff officers had his horse shot under him. One of them, Gus. Henry, had two shot under him. One of his aids was shot through the hip, and his horse was riddled with balls. Pillow wore a splendid uniform, very conspicuous, and rode the handsomest gray mare in the army. As we watched the fighting from the bluff, and saw our me
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