hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 1,000 0 Browse Search
Doc 512 0 Browse Search
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) 394 0 Browse Search
Missouri (Missouri, United States) 218 0 Browse Search
Columbus, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) 197 17 Browse Search
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) 197 9 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 196 16 Browse Search
Hilton Head (South Carolina, United States) 170 2 Browse Search
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) 158 0 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 150 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 160 total hits in 36 results.

1 2 3 4
Pilottown (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 164
the Preble and stood up the river, when Acting-Master Wilcox reporting we were getting too close to the starboard shore, the helm was put up, and the ship rapdily fell off, presenting her broadside up and down the river. As soon as she had drifted near the head of the Passes, ineffectual attempts were made to get her head up stream, when I found myself a mile and a half down the Southwest Pass. I then put the helm up, continued down the river, hoping to be able to get her head round off Pilot Town. In doing this she drifted some distance below, grounding broadside too. Soon after this, the enemy opened their fire upon us, which was kept up for about two hours. The day before leaving the head of the Passes I had succeeded in placing one of our 9-inch broadside guns on the top-gallant forecastle, giving a long range, and it was continually fired during the engagement. About nine o'clock A. M., during the firing, it was reported to me that several boats filled with men were leaving t
Mississippi (United States) (search for this): chapter 164
Commander Handy's report. see Doc. 78, page 180 ante. United States ship Vincennes, off Southwest Pass, Mississippi River, Oct. 14, 1861. sir: I have to report my safe arrival at this place, having left the head of the Passes on the 1vant, Robert Handy, Commander. Captain Pope's report. United States steamer Richmond, off Pass à L'Outre, Mississippi River, October 17, 1861. sir: My report to you in regard to our leaving the head of the Passes having been made in a gmanding U. S. ship Vincennes. Commander French's report. United States steamer Preble, off Southwest Pass, Mississippi River, October 22, 1861. sir: In obedience to your order, I have to make to you the following statement of the occurreer 24, 1861. sir: In compliance with your instructions, the following statement of the recent occurrences in the Mississippi River, on the morning of Saturday, October 12, 1861, is respectfully submitted: The Water Witch, after towing a schoon
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 164
ssissippi. Commander Handy's report. see Doc. 78, page 180 ante. United States ship Vincennes, off Southwest Pass, Mississippi River, Oct. 14, 1861. siobedient servant, Robert Handy, Commander. Captain Pope's report. United States steamer Richmond, off Pass à L'Outre, Mississippi River, October 17, 1861. he ship? Shall I burn her when I leave her? Respectfully, Robert Handy. United States steamer Richmond, Southwest Pass, October 12, 1861. Sir: You say your shHandy. Commanding U. S. ship Vincennes. Commander French's report. United States steamer Preble, off Southwest Pass, Mississippi River, October 22, 1861. ip Preble. Flag-officer Wm. W. Mckean, Commanding Gulf Blockading Squadron, United States Ship Niagara. Lieutenant Winslow's report. United States steamer wUnited States steamer water Witch, off Southwest Pass, October 24, 1861. sir: In compliance with your instructions, the following statement of the recent occurrences in the Mississippi
Key West (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 164
with a range of only fifteen fathoms' cable, in readiness to slip in case of emergency. While firing at him, word was passed that the Richmond was going ahead of us, and to hold our fire. I was directing the firing of the battery, and hearing it, looked out of a port and saw that she was astern, barely, lapping my quarter, and therefore continued my firing until the ram was out of line of pointing. I at once manned my deck tackle, (for my capstan has been crippled since the hurricane at Key West, and I am therefore compelled to use deck tackles,) and began to heave in my chain. Immediately on the rocket being thrown up from the ram, three bright lights were seen coming down the river, directly toward this ship, which we at first supposed to be steamers coming to attack us. They soon, however, increased so rapidly in size that we were fully convinced they were fire-ships, and such they proved to be. I was then working smartly with my deck tackles, and should have succeeded in weigh
Pensacola (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 164
ng been rumored there was a panic on board this ship, at the time she was engaged with the enemy, I state it to be false; both officers and men exhibited the utmost coolness and determination to do their duty. My orders, and those of all the officers, were carried out with as much coolness as if it had been an everyday affair, and their whole conduct merits high commendation; and they would feel gratified to prove their bravery by being permitted to take part in the contemplated attack on Pensacola, as requested in notes from me to you on this subject. In both engagements with the enemy, the whole fire appeared to be directed to the destruction of this snip, most of the shot being, apparently, directed to the quarter of this vessel, presumed for the purpose of disabling our rudder and propeller. I omitted, in my hasty report, to mention the essential aid I have received from Captain Gray, commanding the army transport McClellan, in getting this ship and the Vincennes afloat. Fro
Fort Pickens (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 164
as well while awaiting, in uncertainty and obscurity, the breaking of day at the head of the Passes, as subsequently, when under the fire of the enemy. After transferring to the Preble the officers and men of the Vincennes who had taken refuge on board our vessel, the Water Witch was next engaged in another unsuccessful attempt to get that ship afloat, Commander Handy, with the greater part of his crew, having returned on board. During the afternoon the steamer McClellan arrived from Fort Pickens with two Parrott guns, which were immediately placed on board the Richmond, and about four P. M. the Water Witch was despatched by Captain Pope to communicate with the steamers South Carolina and Huntsville, (in Barrataria and Berwick bays,) taking verbal orders to Commander Alden to proceed to Pass à l'outre, and to Commander Price to join the Richmond at Southwest Pass. Regretting my inability to communicate more briefly a faithful detail of the events of the day, I have the honor to
North East river (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 164
eutenant Commanding Winslow, commanding the Water Witch, I received every possible assistance that could be rendered. I directed Commander French, of the Preble, as soon as it could be done, to Pass à l'outre to guard that entrance. This he was unable to do at the time; the wind being ahead, and a strong current setting to leeward, he was barely able to hold his own. He came in and anchored and reported to me; he was quite out of wood and coal. I told him he could procure wood off the Northeast Pass, where he would be stationed after the arrival of one of the steamers at Pass à l'outre. He replied, it was impossible to get wood there, and earnestly requested to go to Ship Island, where he would in two days procure wood sufficient for himself and the Vincennes. I reluctantly consented to his doing so, knowing that one of the steamers, either the South Carolina or Huntsville, would reach Pass à l'outre in advance of him. All of which is respectfully submitted. I have the hono
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 164
but the day following I was relieved from my embarrassing situation by the South Carolina and McClellan. I trust, sir, that my conduct will meet with your entire ap wait until a rise of the tide. At early daylight of the 13th instant, the South Carolina, Commander Alden, came in, and I directed him to proceed, and, if possible, four rifled guns on board the McClellan, together with the long gun of the South Carolina, would keep the enemy at bay. At about 2 P. M., the Vincennes was got afloat, crossed the bar, and anchored near this ship, and the South Carolina was immediately despatched to Pass à l'outre, to guard that place until I could send him a reltly consented to his doing so, knowing that one of the steamers, either the South Carolina or Huntsville, would reach Pass à l'outre in advance of him. All of whicWater Witch was despatched by Captain Pope to communicate with the steamers South Carolina and Huntsville, (in Barrataria and Berwick bays,) taking verbal orders to C
Barrataria Bay (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 164
ter transferring to the Preble the officers and men of the Vincennes who had taken refuge on board our vessel, the Water Witch was next engaged in another unsuccessful attempt to get that ship afloat, Commander Handy, with the greater part of his crew, having returned on board. During the afternoon the steamer McClellan arrived from Fort Pickens with two Parrott guns, which were immediately placed on board the Richmond, and about four P. M. the Water Witch was despatched by Captain Pope to communicate with the steamers South Carolina and Huntsville, (in Barrataria and Berwick bays,) taking verbal orders to Commander Alden to proceed to Pass à l'outre, and to Commander Price to join the Richmond at Southwest Pass. Regretting my inability to communicate more briefly a faithful detail of the events of the day, I have the honor to remain, with much respect, your obedient servant, Francis Winslow, Lieutenant Commanding. Flag-officer Wm. W. Mckean, Commanding Gulf Blockading Squadron.
Ship Island (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 164
done, to Pass à l'outre to guard that entrance. This he was unable to do at the time; the wind being ahead, and a strong current setting to leeward, he was barely able to hold his own. He came in and anchored and reported to me; he was quite out of wood and coal. I told him he could procure wood off the Northeast Pass, where he would be stationed after the arrival of one of the steamers at Pass à l'outre. He replied, it was impossible to get wood there, and earnestly requested to go to Ship Island, where he would in two days procure wood sufficient for himself and the Vincennes. I reluctantly consented to his doing so, knowing that one of the steamers, either the South Carolina or Huntsville, would reach Pass à l'outre in advance of him. All of which is respectfully submitted. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, John Pope, Captain. Flag-officer Wm. W. Mckean Commanding Blockading Squadron. P. S.--This and my first report to you embraces all
1 2 3 4