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Michigan (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 215
the past — in the home of that statesman (Cass) whose life has been devoted to his country — that monument of a man living and embodying the history of the nation. God grant that he may live to see our country again united! (Applause.) It is with pleasure that I stand here in the home of that man whose blood has baptized our great cause, for which he lies this night confined in a hostile dungeon. When I utter these words of bravery and patriotism, you know I embody the name of Wilcox, of Michigan. (Prolonged cheers.) And I trust that the time is not far distant, when he shall again stand by the side of Corcoran, of the glorious Sixty-ninth--that loyal wall of true Irish hearts — restored to the country which he has honored. (Cheers.) Let me now plainly and briefly relate the circumstances of a little affair that happened to us in Missouri. Just outside the limits of Jefferson City, overlooking the broad Missouri, were encamped two regiments, over which floated twin banners — ban
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 215
he lies this night confined in a hostile dungeon. When I utter these words of bravery and patriotism, you know I embody the name of Wilcox, of Michigan. (Prolonged cheers.) And I trust that the time is not far distant, when he shall again stand by the side of Corcoran, of the glorious Sixty-ninth--that loyal wall of true Irish hearts — restored to the country which he has honored. (Cheers.) Let me now plainly and briefly relate the circumstances of a little affair that happened to us in Missouri. Just outside the limits of Jefferson City, overlooking the broad Missouri, were encamped two regiments, over which floated twin banners — banners which have been twins in the past, and may they ever be so in the future — the harp of Ireland and the stars of America. (Applause.) Under these twin banners lay as rollicking and happy a regiment as was ever collected together. It was the Irish Brigade of Chicago. At the hour of midnight, it received an order to march to the relief of Col. M<
College Hill (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 215
them in check until Capt. Dillon's company, of the Missouri Thirteenth, drove them back, and burned the bridge. That closed our work before breakfast. Immediately six companies of the Missouri Thirteenth and two companies of Illinois Cavalry were despatched in search of the retreating enemy. They engaged them in a cornfield, fought with them gallantly, and harassed them to such an extent as to delay their progress, in order to give time for constructing intrenchments around the camp on College Hill. This had the desired effect, and we succeeded in throwing up earth-works three or four feet in height. This consumed the night, and was continued during the next day, the outposts still opposing the enemy, and keeping them back as far as possible. At three o'clock in the afternoon of the 12th the engagement opened with artillery. A volley of grapeshot was thrown among the officers, who stood in front of the breastworks. The guns within the intrenchments immediately replied with a vi
Jefferson City (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 215
dungeon. When I utter these words of bravery and patriotism, you know I embody the name of Wilcox, of Michigan. (Prolonged cheers.) And I trust that the time is not far distant, when he shall again stand by the side of Corcoran, of the glorious Sixty-ninth--that loyal wall of true Irish hearts — restored to the country which he has honored. (Cheers.) Let me now plainly and briefly relate the circumstances of a little affair that happened to us in Missouri. Just outside the limits of Jefferson City, overlooking the broad Missouri, were encamped two regiments, over which floated twin banners — banners which have been twins in the past, and may they ever be so in the future — the harp of Ireland and the stars of America. (Applause.) Under these twin banners lay as rollicking and happy a regiment as was ever collected together. It was the Irish Brigade of Chicago. At the hour of midnight, it received an order to march to the relief of Col. Marshall's Cavalry, then threatened by the<
Detroit (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 215
Doc. 203. the siege of Lexington, Mo. Speech of Col. Mulligan. at the reception given to Colonel Mulligan in Detroit, Mich., on the 29th of Nov., the Colonel delivered the following speech: ladies and gentlemen: It is with no ordinary pleasure that I appear before you this night. It is with a peculiar pride that I stand in Detroit, so sacred to the memories of the past — in the home of that statesman (Cass) whose life has been devoted to his country — that monument of a man living aDetroit, so sacred to the memories of the past — in the home of that statesman (Cass) whose life has been devoted to his country — that monument of a man living and embodying the history of the nation. God grant that he may live to see our country again united! (Applause.) It is with pleasure that I stand here in the home of that man whose blood has baptized our great cause, for which he lies this night confined in a hostile dungeon. When I utter these words of bravery and patriotism, you know I embody the name of Wilcox, of Michigan. (Prolonged cheers.) And I trust that the time is not far distant, when he shall again stand by the side of Corcoran
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 215
an, of the glorious Sixty-ninth--that loyal wall of true Irish hearts — restored to the country which he has honored. (Cheers.) Let me now plainly and briefly relate the circumstances of a little affair that happened to us in Missouri. Just outside the limits of Jefferson City, overlooking the broad Missouri, were encamped two regiments, over which floated twin banners — banners which have been twins in the past, and may they ever be so in the future — the harp of Ireland and the stars of America. (Applause.) Under these twin banners lay as rollicking and happy a regiment as was ever collected together. It was the Irish Brigade of Chicago. At the hour of midnight, it received an order to march to the relief of Col. Marshall's Cavalry, then threatened by the enemy, and with them to cut their way through to Lexington and hold it at all hazards. The next morning saw the Irish Brigade with its face set towards Lexington. We started with forty rounds of ammunition and three days rat<
Lexington, Lafayette County (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 215
Doc. 203. the siege of Lexington, Mo. Speech of Col. Mulligan. at the reception given to Colonel Mulligan in Detroit, Mich., on the 29th of Nov., the Colonel delivered the following speech: ladies and gentlemen: It is with no ordinary pleasure that I appear before you this night. It is with a peculiar pride that I stand in Detroit, so sacred to the memories of the past — in the home of that statesman (Cass) whose life has been devoted to his country — that monument of a man living and embodying the history of the nation. God grant that he may live to see our country again united! (Applause.) It is with pleasure that I stand here in the home of that man whose blood has baptized our great cause, for which he lies this night confined in a hostile dungeon. When I utter these words of bravery and patriotism, you know I embody the name of Wilcox, of Michigan. (Prolonged cheers.) And I trust that the time is not far distant, when he shall again stand by the side of Corcoran,
Chicago (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 215
and briefly relate the circumstances of a little affair that happened to us in Missouri. Just outside the limits of Jefferson City, overlooking the broad Missouri, were encamped two regiments, over which floated twin banners — banners which have been twins in the past, and may they ever be so in the future — the harp of Ireland and the stars of America. (Applause.) Under these twin banners lay as rollicking and happy a regiment as was ever collected together. It was the Irish Brigade of Chicago. At the hour of midnight, it received an order to march to the relief of Col. Marshall's Cavalry, then threatened by the enemy, and with them to cut their way through to Lexington and hold it at all hazards. The next morning saw the Irish Brigade with its face set towards Lexington. We started with forty rounds of ammunition and three days rations, and advanced for nine days without meeting the energy, foraging upon the country in the mean time for support. As we moved along, war smooth
and by the side of Corcoran, of the glorious Sixty-ninth--that loyal wall of true Irish hearts — restored to the country which he has honored. (Cheers.) Let me now plainly and briefly relate the circumstances of a little affair that happened to us in Missouri. Just outside the limits of Jefferson City, overlooking the broad Missouri, were encamped two regiments, over which floated twin banners — banners which have been twins in the past, and may they ever be so in the future — the harp of Ireland and the stars of America. (Applause.) Under these twin banners lay as rollicking and happy a regiment as was ever collected together. It was the Irish Brigade of Chicago. At the hour of midnight, it received an order to march to the relief of Col. Marshall's Cavalry, then threatened by the enemy, and with them to cut their way through to Lexington and hold it at all hazards. The next morning saw the Irish Brigade with its face set towards Lexington. We started with forty rounds of ammu<
Warrensburg (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 215
found Col. Marshall's Cavalry and a few Home Guards, and I wish, for our sakes, there had been fewer. I have a very poor opinion of Home Guards. I have found them invincible in peace and invisible in war. (Laughter.) They are generally content to stay at home under the shadow of the paternal mansion and let the country take care of itself. I say, we found a few of these Home Guards there. On the 10th of September, a letter arrived from Col. Peabody, saying that he was retreating from Warrensburg, twenty-five miles distant, and that Price was pursuing him with ten thousand men. A few hours afterward, Colonel Peabody, with the Thirteenth Missouri, entered Lexington. We then had two thousand seven hundred and eighty men in garrison and forty rounds of cartridges. At noon of the 11th we commenced throwing up our first intrenchments. In six hours afterward, the enemy opened their fire. Col. Peabody was ordered out to meet them. The camp then presented a lively scene; officers wer
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