hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 1,000 0 Browse Search
Doc 512 0 Browse Search
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) 394 0 Browse Search
Missouri (Missouri, United States) 218 0 Browse Search
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) 197 9 Browse Search
Columbus, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) 197 17 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 196 16 Browse Search
Hilton Head (South Carolina, United States) 170 2 Browse Search
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) 158 0 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 150 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 35 total hits in 14 results.

1 2
Four Locks (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 229
Doc. 217. affair near Williamsport, Md. Captain Robinson's official report. Headquarters Co. D, First Reg. Va. Brigade, U. S. Volunteers, Four Locks, near Williamsport, Md., Dec. 9, 1861. Col. S. H. Leonard, Commanding Williamsport and Vicinity, Md.: sir: I have the honor to report that, on Friday afternoon, the 6th inst., my pickets at Dam No. 5 and Back Creek were fired on by the enemy, by cavalry at the former place, and infantry at the latter. The sergeants in charge of each of those pickets immediately communicated with me here, and I despatched reinforcements to both places; but after some shots had been exchanged all remained quiet during the remainder of that day and night. The sergeant at dam No. 5 reported three wounded on the side of the enemy, but none of our men were hurt at either place. On Saturday afternoon, about half-past 3 o'clock P. M., I was apprised of the advance of the enemy in strong force in the direction of Dam No. 5. I immediately took my
Williamsport (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 229
Doc. 217. affair near Williamsport, Md. Captain Robinson's official report. Headquarters Co. D, First Reg. Va. Brigade, U. S. Volunteers, Four Locks, near Williamsport, Md., Dec. 9, 1861. Col. S. H. Leonard, Commanding Williamsport and VicWilliamsport, Md., Dec. 9, 1861. Col. S. H. Leonard, Commanding Williamsport and Vicinity, Md.: sir: I have the honor to report that, on Friday afternoon, the 6th inst., my pickets at Dam No. 5 and Back Creek were fired on by the enemy, by cavalry at the former place, and infantry at the latter. The sergeants in charge of each Williamsport and Vicinity, Md.: sir: I have the honor to report that, on Friday afternoon, the 6th inst., my pickets at Dam No. 5 and Back Creek were fired on by the enemy, by cavalry at the former place, and infantry at the latter. The sergeants in charge of each of those pickets immediately communicated with me here, and I despatched reinforcements to both places; but after some shots had been exchanged all remained quiet during the remainder of that day and night. The sergeant at dam No. 5 reported three wc., Gilbert Robinson, Captain Commanding Post. An eye-witness gives the following account of the attack: Williamsport, Md., Sunday, December 8, 1861. I have just returned from Dam No. 5, about seven miles above this on the Potomac, whe
at that point, were the only men we had present; but they were reinforced this morning about two o'clock by Company C, Capt. Wm. H. Jackson, of the Thirteenth Massachusetts, Col. Leonard, who left this place last night about ten o'clock. The rebels opened the battle by throwing shell and canister in rapid succession. They had four or five ten-pound rifled cannon, and one large Parrott gun; but when they had ceased firing at dark last evening, had succeeded in doing nothing but destroy Mr. Stanhope's house, which stood close by the river on this side. They also threw several cannon balls into several other small buildings which stood in the neighborhood of Stanhope's house. Our men had no artillery, and returned the fire occasionally with small arms. Some of our men were in and about the buildings toward which the enemy's shot was directed, but most of Capt. Jackson's company were stationed along a fence running parallel with the river, on the brow of the hill on this side of the
William H. Jackson (search for this): chapter 229
ginia First, who were on picket duty at that point, were the only men we had present; but they were reinforced this morning about two o'clock by Company C, Capt. Wm. H. Jackson, of the Thirteenth Massachusetts, Col. Leonard, who left this place last night about ten o'clock. The rebels opened the battle by throwing shell and cany, and returned the fire occasionally with small arms. Some of our men were in and about the buildings toward which the enemy's shot was directed, but most of Capt. Jackson's company were stationed along a fence running parallel with the river, on the brow of the hill on this side of the river. There was also a large hill on the d with shell and canister at daylight this morning. It was at once as brisk and unceasing as it had been yesterday, but was immediately returned vigorously by Capt. Jackson's company, who had by this time arrived and taken their position on the top of the hill. As soon, however, as the rebels had discovered their position this mo
Doc. 217. affair near Williamsport, Md. Captain Robinson's official report. Headquarters Co. D, First Reg. Va. Brigade, U. S. Volunteers, Four Locks, near Williamsport, Md., Dec. 9, 1861. Col. S. H. Leonard, Commanding Williamsport and Vicinity, Md.: sir: I have the honor to report that, on Friday afternoon, the 6th inst., my pickets at Dam No. 5 and Back Creek were fired on by the enemy, by cavalry at the former place, and infantry at the latter. The sergeants in charge of each of those pickets immediately communicated with me here, and I despatched reinforcements to both places; but after some shots had been exchanged all remained quiet during the remainder of that day and night. The sergeant at dam No. 5 reported three wounded on the side of the enemy, but none of our men were hurt at either place. On Saturday afternoon, about half-past 3 o'clock P. M., I was apprised of the advance of the enemy in strong force in the direction of Dam No. 5. I immediately took my
Gilbert Robinson (search for this): chapter 229
Doc. 217. affair near Williamsport, Md. Captain Robinson's official report. Headquarters Co. D, First Reg. Va. Brigade, U. S. Volunteers, Four Locks, near Williamsport, Md., Dec. 9, 1861. Col. S. H. Leonard, Commanding Williamsport and Vicithe Dam, at which place they left behind them a considerable quantity of intrenching tools. I have the honor, &c., Gilbert Robinson, Captain Commanding Post. An eye-witness gives the following account of the attack: Williamsport, Md., Su. When the firing was first commenced, about four o'clock last evening, by the rebels on the other side of the river, Capt. Robinson's Company, of Col. Lehman's regiment, the Virginia First, who were on picket duty at that point, were the only men wef their artillery, and the second shell they threw struck a large barn on the brow of the hill, a little to the right of Robinson's men, belonging to John Sterling, which immediately took fire and was burned to the ground. Some of the Massachusetts
S. H. Leonard (search for this): chapter 229
Doc. 217. affair near Williamsport, Md. Captain Robinson's official report. Headquarters Co. D, First Reg. Va. Brigade, U. S. Volunteers, Four Locks, near Williamsport, Md., Dec. 9, 1861. Col. S. H. Leonard, Commanding Williamsport and Vicinity, Md.: sir: I have the honor to report that, on Friday afternoon, the 6th inst., my pickets at Dam No. 5 and Back Creek were fired on by the enemy, by cavalry at the former place, and infantry at the latter. The sergeants in charge of each off Col. Lehman's regiment, the Virginia First, who were on picket duty at that point, were the only men we had present; but they were reinforced this morning about two o'clock by Company C, Capt. Wm. H. Jackson, of the Thirteenth Massachusetts, Col. Leonard, who left this place last night about ten o'clock. The rebels opened the battle by throwing shell and canister in rapid succession. They had four or five ten-pound rifled cannon, and one large Parrott gun; but when they had ceased firing a
e quantity of intrenching tools. I have the honor, &c., Gilbert Robinson, Captain Commanding Post. An eye-witness gives the following account of the attack: Williamsport, Md., Sunday, December 8, 1861. I have just returned from Dam No. 5, about seven miles above this on the Potomac, where a sharp skirmish has been going on all day. When the firing was first commenced, about four o'clock last evening, by the rebels on the other side of the river, Capt. Robinson's Company, of Col. Lehman's regiment, the Virginia First, who were on picket duty at that point, were the only men we had present; but they were reinforced this morning about two o'clock by Company C, Capt. Wm. H. Jackson, of the Thirteenth Massachusetts, Col. Leonard, who left this place last night about ten o'clock. The rebels opened the battle by throwing shell and canister in rapid succession. They had four or five ten-pound rifled cannon, and one large Parrott gun; but when they had ceased firing at dark
James Kenney (search for this): chapter 229
has been no firing on either side. The enemy's shells, this evening, were directed toward Sterling's house, which stood a little in the rear of the barn, but they did not succeed in hitting it. None of our men were killed or wounded, save James Kenney, of Company C, of the Massachusetts Thirteenth, who received two pretty severe flesh wounds in the thigh and in the calf of the leg. He was wounded while coming up the hill from the river, where he had taken his position during the night, withmy were flying thick and fast about it; but he will soon be on his way to Boston, from whence he hails. It is not known how many the rebels lost, but several were seen to fall, and taken into a couple of houses which stand on the Virginia side. Kenney was wounded by a Minie ball, which seemed to be the only kind of small shot the rebels used. The firing of small arms was very brisk on both sides during the whole day. We expect some artillery here daily, but the rebels have removed from the
John Sterling (search for this): chapter 229
however, as the rebels had discovered their position this morning, they elevated the range of their artillery, and the second shell they threw struck a large barn on the brow of the hill, a little to the right of Robinson's men, belonging to John Sterling, which immediately took fire and was burned to the ground. Some of the Massachusetts boys, who had been enjoying a nap on the hay-mow during the after part of the night, had just left the barn when the shell struck it. Mr. Sterling had barelMr. Sterling had barely time to get his horses and cattle from it, and lost his entire crop of grain. The cannonading ceased about nine o'clock this morning, but was renewed again about four this evening, and kept up till dark, since which time there has been no firing on either side. The enemy's shells, this evening, were directed toward Sterling's house, which stood a little in the rear of the barn, but they did not succeed in hitting it. None of our men were killed or wounded, save James Kenney, of Company
1 2