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Difficult Creek (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 246
I must not forget the prompt manner in which General Reynolds came up from Difficult Creek, some four miles off, as soon as he heard the cannonading. He arrived tooe. Nothing of special importance occurred until about one mile west of Difficult Creek, when the scouting parties reported that a considerable force of the enemyGeneral J. F. Reynolds, with the First brigade, was directed to move on to Difficult Creek, to be ready to support Ord in the event of his meeting a force stronger ts brigade. I stopped for a few moments with Brigadier-General Reynolds at Difficult Creek, and, having directed him to be in readiness to move forward rapidly in ca solid body, and but few stragglers remaining on the road. They halted at Difficult Creek, as an alarm was communicated to the officers, but it proved to be unfounded, and the forces proceeded. Difficult Creek is a narrow stream, with a heavy stone bridge, which had been erected by the local authorities of Virginia. The posit
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 246
battery well served. The wounded officers, Lieutenant-Colonel Kane, and Capt. Niles, of the Kane Rifles; Captain Bradbury, of the Sixth, and Captains Dick and Galway, of the Ninth Pennsylvania reserve volunteer corps, were conspicuous, leading their men when wounded. Others there were, as you can well imagine, equally brave, but it would be invidious to attempt to select them. The prisoners report that the brigade engaged against us was composed of the Kentucky Rifles, an Alabama, a South Carolina, and a Virginia regiment, with a six-gun battery, all under the command of General Stuart. I must not forget the prompt manner in which General Reynolds came up from Difficult Creek, some four miles off, as soon as he heard the cannonading. He arrived too late, it is true, to take part in the affair, but the certainty that he would come with his brigade, insured a victory, and stimulated our men to earn it. With respect, sir, your obedient servant, E. O. C. Ord, Brigadier Genera
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 246
and grape took effect in the most vital parts, indicating with what unvarying precision and accuracy the enemy shot. Corporal B----, who was one of the number who accompanied me to the field, put himself to some trouble to ascertain the number of the dead, which he says was thirty-four. Passing on further down, we saw a caisson which had been set on fire by a bomb from the enemy, causing immediate explosion, which, I am told, caused the instant death of two men of the Sumter Artillery, of Georgia. The head of one of them was entirely severed from the body, that of the other cut off just above the nose. I never saw such a sight before. Our killed was thirty-four, and as many wounded. The enemy are supposed to have sustained but a small loss--three killed and thirty or forty wounded. The Federal victory is owing, of course, to the superiority of their position; we could not get our battery in position for action, at least but one or two pieces. Some sixteen of our artillery horse
Palmetto (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 246
ers, and well-nigh outflanked on our left, we were ordered to fall back to a more advantageous position. The regiment fell back in good order and re-formed, and was shortly afterward withdrawn from the field. The Kentuckians fought well on the left, the Virginians and Alabamians bravely on the right, but the heavy loss sustained by South Carolinians, in the centre, shows conclusively that she was in the heat of the fight, and that her suffering was as severe as any other regiment engaged. Palmetto. --Richmond Dispatch, Jan. 8. Rebels killed and wounded. The Norfolk Day Book, in its account of the fight, makes out the following losses: Regiments.Killed.Wounded.Missing.Total. Eleventh Virginia516122 Tenth Alabama15453090 Sixth South Carolina1844567 S. Carolina Artillery413--17 First Kentucky125834   Total4314344230 These figures are more likely to be below the real number than up to it. Gen. Ord's men found sixty-nine dead rebels on the battle-field, and as the
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 246
irection of Dranesville. The First Rifles, Pennsylvania reserve, Lieutenant-Colonel Kane, have been Colonel John S. McCalmont, (Tenth regiment Pennsylvania reserve corps;) Colonel C. F. Jackson, Nintry; Lieutenant E. D. Reid, Twelfth regiment Pennsylvania reserve corps; Captain W. M. Painter, assis Lieutenant A. B. Sharpe, (Seventh regiment Pennsylvania volunteer reserve corps,) aide-de-camp; andrst Lieutenant S. B. Smith, (Tenth regiment Pennsylvania volunteer reserve corps,) acting assistant McCalmont, of the Tenth regiment infantry, Pennsylvania reserve; Lieutenant-Colonel T. L. Kane, First Rifles, Pennsylvania reserve; Captain Easton, artillery, Pennsylvania reserve; Lieutenant and Adjt Henry B. McKean, Sixth regiment infantry, Pennsylvania reserve, more particularly attracted my attr thrifty agriculturists in Connecticut and Pennsylvania. Gunnell himself had gone away, leaving thour men — their enthusiasm and discipline. Pennsylvania may be proud of her sons. There may be gre[6 more...]
Centreville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 246
oad in our then rear, my front being toward Centreville. This I did because, from the occasional a a limber, scattered along the road towards Centreville, and in the woods on both sides. I beg to y about five hundred yards in front, on the Centreville road. Here I stopped to observe the practiing what force might be thrown forward from Centreville to support the troops we had encountered, Ipresent, as two or three regiments had left Centreville at three A. M., and they, the Kentucky and ill and Falls Church. Northeastwardly from Centreville, and some miles from the Fairfax road, it ion with the forces in upper Virginia and at Centreville by a good military road, and the Loudon and R. Y. Rebel account of the fight. Centreville, December 24, 1861. Yesterday morning a n wagons, we set out about four o'clock for Centreville, distant, the way we went, not less than twe were willing to go the entire distance to Centreville; the reply was yes! with emphasis. So on
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 246
ounded; also, a large number of the enemy's wounded, left by them on the ground. With great respect, I am sir, your obedient servant, E. O. C. Ord, Brig.-Gen. Commanding Third Brigade, P. R. V. C. Brig.-Gen. Lorenzo Thomas. Adjutant General U. S. A., Washington, D. C. List of the men recommended for reward for gallant conduct at the battle of Dranesville, December 20, 1861, by Captain H. Easton, of battery A, First Pennsylvania Artillery: Quartermaster's Sergeant John H. Sphar; Ordees, we are friends-South Carolinians. On which side are you? asked Colonel Taylor. For the Union, and immediately after the Colonel gave the command to fire, and a volley was poured into the Kentuckians from the Ninth Infantry, regulars, U. S. A. The engagement then became general, and our four regiments, with Capt. Cutts' four guns, were soon actively engaged. The Yankees had every advantage of position. There were several houses along the Leesburg turnpike, and back of it a hill upon
Fall's Church (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 246
ia press account. Langley's, Va., Dec. 21, 1861. The Pennsylvania reserve division, under the command of General McCall, occupies an extensive and rather pretty piece of country beyond Langley's church and tavern, the encampments stretching toward Lewinsville. It is the right wing of the great Potomac Division, and in the advance. The position it holds was the last point abandoned by the enemy, and was taken by Gen. McClellan immediately after the occupation of Munson's Hill and Falls Church. Northeastwardly from Centreville, and some miles from the Fairfax road, it is not directly menaced by the rebel forces at Manassas. Its position is an important one, however, for it secures the Chain Bridge, protects the Potomac, prevents a flanking movement from Leesburg, and, with Banks at Edwards' Ferry, and on guard from Seneca Falls to Harper's Ferry, saves Maryland from an invasion. The inside picket lines of our army are some distance from Langley's, and join those from the cen
Washington (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 246
twelve mules, our killed, (seven,) and wounded, (sixty,) among whom are four captains. Some of our wounded had to be brought the whole distance on stretchers, while I am informed the Pennsylvania ambulances for this division are lying empty at Washington. Lists of killed and wounded, and reports of regimental commanders, are herewith enclosed. It is impossible to remember all who were conspicuous, especially as the fighting occurred in thickets, and was scattered over so much ground. Captainy the Yankees were very kind to our wounded, in bringing them to the house; they also left with them a good many bandages, to be used in dressing their wounds. They said the Potomac was not more than three and a half or four miles distant, and Washington twenty-two. I was speaking with two ladies, one of whose names was Miss Day. She was very sprightly; said that her father had been taken the day before — both her father, Dr. Day, and a Mr. Day. They were charged, she said, with fighting agai
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 246
oint abandoned by the enemy, and was taken by Gen. McClellan immediately after the occupation of Munson's Hill and Falls Church. Northeastwardly from Centreville, and some miles from the Fairfax road, it is not directly menaced by the rebel forces at Manassas. Its position is an important one, however, for it secures the Chain Bridge, protects the Potomac, prevents a flanking movement from Leesburg, and, with Banks at Edwards' Ferry, and on guard from Seneca Falls to Harper's Ferry, saves Maryland from an invasion. The inside picket lines of our army are some distance from Langley's, and join those from the centre of the division. Beyond this, there is an open country, not occupied by any military force, including a small village called Dranesville, and extending some three or four miles beyond, in the direction of Leesburg, to a position in the neighborhood of Hunter's Mills, where a rebel entrenchment has been erected, and extended lines of rifle pits and heavy artillery works ar
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