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Union City (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
n arriving at the depot it was found that all the rolling stock had been sent off. A large quantity of contraband supplies, marked for the rebel States, was found in the depot, and immediately seized. They were marked for Fort Gibson, Memphis, Union City, and New Orleans. The whole value of the seizure is over twenty thousand dollars. Amongst these goods seized were about six hundred barrels of flour, one hundred barrels of lard, one hundred and sixty bags of coffee, a large quantity of leafirst Illinois, and the American Zouave regiment, from Cape Girardeau, were poured in, increasing our force to about five thousand effective men. From the most reliable reports recently received at that point there is no rebel force short of Union City and Columbus, and no immediate attack on Paducah is apprehended. Gen. C. F. Smith is now commanding at Paducah. At Cairo the greatest military activity prevails. A very large force is being rapidly formed in and quartered either here, at B
Columbus, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
thousand people are left. The most perfect terror of a battle and of the burning of the city seemed to prevail. In the mean time our troops were reinforced rapidly. On Saturday part of Colonel Oglesby's Eighth regiment, the Forty-first Illinois, and the American Zouave regiment, from Cape Girardeau, were poured in, increasing our force to about five thousand effective men. From the most reliable reports recently received at that point there is no rebel force short of Union City and Columbus, and no immediate attack on Paducah is apprehended. Gen. C. F. Smith is now commanding at Paducah. At Cairo the greatest military activity prevails. A very large force is being rapidly formed in and quartered either here, at Bird's Point, or at the new camp on the Kentucky side, called Camp Holt. This last-named camp was established yesterday, and a heavy battery erected so as to command the Ohio and Mississippi opposite Bird's Point. Fortifications are also being rapidly thrown up h
Bird's Point, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
and Columbus, and no immediate attack on Paducah is apprehended. Gen. C. F. Smith is now commanding at Paducah. At Cairo the greatest military activity prevails. A very large force is being rapidly formed in and quartered either here, at Bird's Point, or at the new camp on the Kentucky side, called Camp Holt. This last-named camp was established yesterday, and a heavy battery erected so as to command the Ohio and Mississippi opposite Bird's Point. Fortifications are also being rapidly thand no immediate attack on Paducah is apprehended. Gen. C. F. Smith is now commanding at Paducah. At Cairo the greatest military activity prevails. A very large force is being rapidly formed in and quartered either here, at Bird's Point, or at the new camp on the Kentucky side, called Camp Holt. This last-named camp was established yesterday, and a heavy battery erected so as to command the Ohio and Mississippi opposite Bird's Point. Fortifications are also being rapidly thrown up here.
Tennessee River (United States) (search for this): chapter 31
the railroad about seven miles. No enemy was discovered; but, as Pillow was reported in large force advancing, a large bridge and trestle work were burned in order to prevent his taking us by surprise. A large log dwelling-house was discovered to be burning down when our troops arrived. It had been set on fire by the rebels, lest our troops might take quarters in it. The report became current in Paducah that a large force of rebels from Tennessee were momentarily expected down the Tennessee River per steamboat. The gunboat Conestoga was sent up that river some thirteen miles to watch movements, and also to capture any boats running into rebel territory. She gave an excellent account of herself, although she met with no enemy in force. Early on Friday a steamer was seen approaching, which, as soon as she got in sight of the Conestoga, took to her heels. The Conestoga gave her chase, and she was soon run ashore, her officers and crew scampering over the bluffs. She turned out
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
A large log dwelling-house was discovered to be burning down when our troops arrived. It had been set on fire by the rebels, lest our troops might take quarters in it. The report became current in Paducah that a large force of rebels from Tennessee were momentarily expected down the Tennessee River per steamboat. The gunboat Conestoga was sent up that river some thirteen miles to watch movements, and also to capture any boats running into rebel territory. She gave an excellent account offerson, a small stern wheel boat, with a heavy load of tobacco, valued at eight thousand dollars. On the next day she captured a stern wheeler, a fine boat, the John Gault; also a small dinkey, called the Pocahontas, belonging to John Bell, of Tennessee. These prizes are all safely moored at Cairo. The battery of the telegraph was not found. The wires had been cut by the rebels a few miles beyond the burned railroad bridge. Several large coils of telegraph wire were seized at Paducah by
Fort Gibson (Oklahoma, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
men and children ran out and cheered for Jeff. Davis. The women seemed crazed with excitement. A musket went off by accident in the rear ranks. The first impression was that the troops had been fired into; but not a head was turned, and the column moved steadily on. On arriving at the depot it was found that all the rolling stock had been sent off. A large quantity of contraband supplies, marked for the rebel States, was found in the depot, and immediately seized. They were marked for Fort Gibson, Memphis, Union City, and New Orleans. The whole value of the seizure is over twenty thousand dollars. Amongst these goods seized were about six hundred barrels of flour, one hundred barrels of lard, one hundred and sixty bags of coffee, a large quantity of leather, several hundred boxes of starch, soap and candles, several hogsheads of bacon, boxes of boots and shoes, and a large quantity of rations. Drays were busily employed on Friday and Saturday in hauling them to the wharf boat
Paducah (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
Doc. 31. the occupation of Paducah, Ky., by Gen. N. S. Grant, September 6. Cairo, Ill., September 11. t movements. Your correspondent has been absent at Paducah, which must be my apology for not writing sooner. received orders to convoy a large body of troops to Paducah. The Ninth Illinois regiment, formerly commanded bmed majestically up La Belle Riviere. We reached Paducah about eight o'clock Friday morning. The disembarkatake quarters in it. The report became current in Paducah that a large force of rebels from Tennessee were moeveral large coils of telegraph wire were seized at Paducah by our troops. The stampede of the inhabitants from Paducah was astonishing and immense, and ere this scarcely a hundred families are left here, out of a populUnion City and Columbus, and no immediate attack on Paducah is apprehended. Gen. C. F. Smith is now commanding at Paducah. At Cairo the greatest military activity prevails. A very large force is being rapidly formed i
Cairo, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
Doc. 31. the occupation of Paducah, Ky., by Gen. N. S. Grant, September 6. Cairo, Ill., September 11. A correspondent of the St. Louis Democrat, gives the subjoined account of the occupation: The last few days have been distinguished bntity of rations. Drays were busily employed on Friday and Saturday in hauling them to the wharf boats, to be shipped to Cairo. On arrival, Commodore Rogers immediately took possession of the telegraph office. He was refused admittance, but the also a small dinkey, called the Pocahontas, belonging to John Bell, of Tennessee. These prizes are all safely moored at Cairo. The battery of the telegraph was not found. The wires had been cut by the rebels a few miles beyond the burned railrty and Columbus, and no immediate attack on Paducah is apprehended. Gen. C. F. Smith is now commanding at Paducah. At Cairo the greatest military activity prevails. A very large force is being rapidly formed in and quartered either here, at Bir
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
burned railroad bridge. Several large coils of telegraph wire were seized at Paducah by our troops. The stampede of the inhabitants from Paducah was astonishing and immense, and ere this scarcely a hundred families are left here, out of a population of from fifteen to twenty thousand people. On Friday and Saturday Main street was perfectly choked with carriages and vehicles, containing families and household furniture, leaving the city for points back in the country. Many went over to Illinois. A perfect panic seemed to possess them, which no assurance of our officers or troops could allay. They had got the idea into their heads that Pillow was advancing on us, that in case of an attack the town would be shelled and burned by our gunboats. General Grant, on his arrival with his command, immediately issued a proclamation, assuring the people of safety and protection, and General Paine, left in command, issued the most strict orders to his troops, prohibiting them under the mo
Cape Girardeau (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
they would be protected, and the poor creatures, relieved of their fright, would thank them. Still the exodus kept on, and it is now thought that out of a population of some fifteen thousand, not three thousand people are left. The most perfect terror of a battle and of the burning of the city seemed to prevail. In the mean time our troops were reinforced rapidly. On Saturday part of Colonel Oglesby's Eighth regiment, the Forty-first Illinois, and the American Zouave regiment, from Cape Girardeau, were poured in, increasing our force to about five thousand effective men. From the most reliable reports recently received at that point there is no rebel force short of Union City and Columbus, and no immediate attack on Paducah is apprehended. Gen. C. F. Smith is now commanding at Paducah. At Cairo the greatest military activity prevails. A very large force is being rapidly formed in and quartered either here, at Bird's Point, or at the new camp on the Kentucky side, called C
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