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California (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
transportation, and the progress made in embarking was very slow. I at once took charge at this point, caused a line to be stretched across the river by which to propel the boats, and forwarded troops in the following order, to wit: Part of California regiment not already crossed, the Rhode Island and New York batteries, the New York Tammany regiment, and the Nineteenth Massachusetts. With the latter regiment I proceeded to the island. I learned that General Baker had been killed, and founeconnoissance on the right, and Captain Markoe, Second Lieutenant Williams, and myself advanced with Companies A and D of the California regiment. Company A got in front on rising ground, in skirmishing order, Company D following in line. The California battalion, to make the story clear, were drawn up on the left of the open field; the Massachusetts Fifteenth and Tammany on the right, and the Massachusetts Twentieth nearer the centre. Colonel Coggswell took charge of the artillery. Only fou
Sullivan's Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
were cut from the coats of the officers. Lieut.-Col. Palfrey's report. Headquarters 20TH Reg. Mass. Vol. Camp Benton, Poolesvile, Md. Thursday, Oct. 24, 1861. To His Excellency Governor Andrew: Governor: It is my painful duty to make the following report: On the morning of the 21st, Col. Lee, with Major Revere and Adjutant Pierson, conducted the whole or the greater part of Companies A, C, D, E, G, H, and I, of the above regiment, to a point on the Virginia shore opposite Sullivan's Island, a little below Conrad's Ferry. The command numbered something over three hundred men. They were accompanied or followed by other troops, the Massachusetts Fifteenth, Col. Devens, among them. They were soon attacked by the enemy, who outnumbered them greatly. The attack continued to be made at intervals, and most of the fighting was in the afternoon. They were very severely treated, and the following is the result, as nearly as I can state it: Missing, believed to be prisoners o
Colorado (Colorado, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
rried away a corner of the first: H. Q. Corps of [Here the bullet struck and a word is missing.] Edwards' Ferry, October 21, 1861. Col. E. D. Baker, Corn. of Brigade: Colonel: In case of heavy firing in front of Harrison's Island, you will advance the California regiment of your brigade, or retire the regiments under Cols. Lee and Devens, now on the [almost rendered illegible by blood] Virginia side of the river, at your discretion — assuming command on arrival. Very respectfully, Col., your most obt. servt., Chas. P. Stone, Brigadier-General Commanding. The second order which follows, was delivered on the battle-field by Col. Coggswell, who said to Col. Baker, in reply to a question what it meant, All right, go ahead. Thereupon Col. Baker put it in his hat without reading. An hour afterward he fell: Headquarters Corps of observation, Edwards' Ferry, Oct. 22--11.50. E. D. Baker, Commanding Brigade: Colonel: I am informed that the force of the enemy is about
Goose Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
road until they should come to the vicinity of a battery which was known to be on that road, and then turn to the left and examine the heights between that and Goose Creek, and see if any of the enemy were posted in the vicinity, find out their numbers as nearly as possible, their disposition, examine the country with reference tod that I wished no advance made unless the enemy were of inferior force, and under no circumstances to pass beyond Leesburg, or a strong position between it and Goose Creek, on the Gum Spring road, i. e., the Manassas road. Colonel Baker was cautioned in reference to passing artillery across the river; and I begged if he did do soroad, you will not follow far, but seize the first good position to cover that road. Their design is to draw us on, if they are obliged to retreat, as far as Goose Creek, where they can be reinforced from Manassas, and have a strong position. Report frequently, so that when they are pushed, Gorman can come up on their flank.
Darnestown (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
saster, and make preparations for moving them as rapidly as possible. Orders arrived from General McClellan to hold the Island Virginia shore at Edwards' Ferry at all risks, indicating at the same time that reinforcements would be sent, and immediately additional means of intrenching were forwarded, and General Gorman was furnished with particular directions to hold out against any and every force of the enemy. During that time, General Hamilton with his brigade was on the march from Darnestown. Before I left to go to the right I issued orders to intercept him, and instructed him to repair to Conrad's Ferry, where orders awaited him to so dispose of his force as to give protection to Harrison's Island and protect the line of the river. At three A. M. Major-General Banks arrived and took command. A report of division for the following days will be made out speedily. I cannot conclude without bearing testimony to the courage, good discipline, and conduct of all the troops of
Vaughan (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
would make every effort to push Gorman's troops carefully forward to discover the best line from that ferry to the Leesburg and Gum Spring road, already mentioned; and the position of the breastworks and hidden battery, which prevented the movement of troops directly from left to right, were also pointed out to him. The means of transportation across, of the sufficiency of which he (Baker) was to be judge, was detailed, and authority given him to make use of the guns of a section each of Vaughan's and Bunting's batteries, together with French's mountain howitzers, all the troops of his brigade and the Tammany regiment, besides the Nineteenth and part of the Twentieth regiments of Massachusetts Volunteers, and I left it to his discretion, after viewing the ground, to retire from the Virginia shore under the cover of his guns and the fire of the large infantry force, or to place our reinforcements in case he found it practicable and the position on the other side favorable. I stated
Leesburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
he enemy is about four thousand, all told. If you can push them, you may do so as far as to have a strong position near Leesburg, if you can keep them before you, avoiding their batteries. If they pass Leesburg and take the Gum Springs road, you wiLeesburg and take the Gum Springs road, you will not follow far, but seize the first good position to cover that road. Their design is to draw us on, if they are obliged to retreat, as far as Goose Creek, where they can be reinforced from Manassas, and have a strong position. Report frequeat Harrison's Island. The point of transit was about five miles above Edwards' Ferry, and nearly an equal distance from Leesburg. The island is a low, fertile strip of land, several miles in length, so dividing the river that the Maryland channel ig was going on above. It seems that Colonel Devens had in the morning moved with a small detachment in the direction of Leesburg, shortly after his forces had crossed, had advanced one mile, there met the enemy's skirmishers in feeble force, and had
Rhode Island (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
from General Stone. I arrived there about half-past 1 o clock P. M., and found among the troops at the point of crossing great confusion, no competent officer seeming to have been left in charge of the transportation, and the progress made in embarking was very slow. I at once took charge at this point, caused a line to be stretched across the river by which to propel the boats, and forwarded troops in the following order, to wit: Part of California regiment not already crossed, the Rhode Island and New York batteries, the New York Tammany regiment, and the Nineteenth Massachusetts. With the latter regiment I proceeded to the island. I learned that General Baker had been killed, and found every thing in confusion, our column being entirely routed and in precipitate retreat, throwing away their arms, deserting their killed and wounded, and leaving a large number of prisoners in the hands of the enemy. I at once took command, arrested as far as possible the progress of the rout,
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
ing taken to annoy the vicinity of the battery on the right. Messengers from Harrison's Island informed me, soon after the arrival of Colonel Baker opposite the island, that he was crossing his whole force as rapidly as possible, and that he had caused an additional flat-boat to be rafted from the canal into the river, and had provided a line to cross the boats more rapidly. In the morning a skirmish took place between two companies of the Twentieth Massachusetts and about one hundred Mississippi riflemen, during which a body of the enemy's cavalry appeared. Colonel Devens then fell back in good order on Colonel Lee's position. Presently he again advanced, his men behaving admirably, fighting, retiring, and advancing in perfect order, and exhibiting every proof of high courage and good discipline. Had the cavalry scouting party, sent him in the morning, been with him then, he could have had timely warning of the approach of the superior force which afterward overwhelmed his reg
Leesburg (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
Bluff, Edwards' Ferry, Harrison's Island, and Leesburg. fought October 21, 1861. General Stone's e and draw out the intentions of the enemy at Leesburg, I went to Edwards' Ferry, at one o'clock P. to the island, having been within one mile of Leesburg, and there discovering in the edge of a wood to make a reconnoissance in the direction of Leesburg from Edwards' Ferry, I directed General Gormaoceeded to examine the space between that and Leesburg, sending back to report that thus far he coul the first, and connected by a good road with Leesburg. Capt. Candy, assistant adjutant-general, anng as far as it was safe on the right, toward Leesburg, and on the left toward the Leesburg and Gum Leesburg and Gum Spring road. I also informed Col. Baker that Gen. German, opposite Edwards' Ferry, should be reinfodiscover the best line from that ferry to the Leesburg and Gum Spring road, already mentioned; and tce, and under no circumstances to pass beyond Leesburg, or a strong position between it and Goose Cr[3 more...]
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