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Broad River (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
The draft of this plan was made by G. C. Plicque, of the engineers attached to the Port Royal expedition. The batteries were situated--one, a strong, admirably-built fortification, called Fort Walker, mounting 23 guns, on the one side of the Broad River, (here about 2 1/2 miles wide,) and two other batteries, behind less elaborate earthworks, on the opposite side of the river. Of the latter, one mounted 15 guns, and was named Fort Beauregard, and the other 4 guns. The plan of the attack wasion. The light vessels which I hoped to have made use of, were destroyed on the desertion of the forts by the rebels. The post-offices were visited, and a number of documents, letters, &c., obtained. I have covered Scull Creek, the mouth of Broad River, and have cut off this communication between Charleston and Savannah. Respectfully, your obedient servant, S. F. Dupont, Flag-officer Commanding United States Atlantic Squadron. Letter of the Secretary of war. Navy Department, Was
Bluffton (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
a cannon, by which hot shot was driven on the powder without the wet wad preceding it. The rest of the story is briefly told. Late on Thursday night the garrison of Fort Walker had collected at the landing, in the hope of being able to reach Bluffton by water. Luckily, several small Confederate steamers were within hail. But here a ludicrous mistake occurred. The retreating troops imagined the little steamers to be Yankee gunboats; while the crews of the steamers were convinced that the twere a body of disembarked Yankees. Acting upon this double delusion, a deal of mutual reconnoitring was made, and it was only after a vast variety of strategic approaches that they reached the conclusion that it was all right. A quick trip to Bluffton followed. Thence the regiment marched to Hardeeville, seventeen miles distant. The road along which they dragged their exhausted frames was filled with a heterogeneous throng of fugitives of all conditions, carriages, carts, and conveyances of
Pembina (North Dakota, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
ory. To make a long story short, he is perfect master of his profession in my opinion, second to none, and so considered by all on board the Unadilla. On the morning of the 7th November at nine o'clock the signal was made from the flag-ship to get under way, a signal we had been watching anxiously for some time. I never saw an anchor come up livelier in my life. We then started up the bay in the following order: Wabash, Susquehanna, Seminole, Mohican, Pawnee, Unadilla, Ottawa, Seneca, Pembina, Augusta, Bienville, Curlew, Penguin, Pocahontas, Isaac Smith, and R. B. Forbes. The two batteries are called Forts Beauregard and Walker. The former on the right, on Bay Point, the other on the left, on Hilton Head. The former mounting eighteen guns, and the other twenty-two, and big ones, too--ten-inch columbiads and eighty pounders, rifled. We commenced on Fort Beauregard and so round to Fort Walker, keeping under weigh and going round, first one fort and then the other. The ball
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
only dangerous ones. It admits the largest class of vessels; it is easily defended; it is in the heart of South Carolina; it is twenty miles from Savannah, and thirty from Charleston; it has room enough for the navies of the world; it is a Fortress Monroe in South Carolina. Negroes are pouring in; they believe their condition is to be bettered. The white men have all fled. Vessels go up to Beaufort to-day. This will be carried by Capt. Steedman, of the Bienville, who followed the Wabashfectionate son, Owen. Letter from the Unadilla. The following is an extract from a private letter of an officer of the gunboat Unadilla: off Hilton head, Port Royal, S. C., U. S. Gunboat Unadilla, Nov. 9, 1861. <*> On leaving Fortress Monroe our after engine broke down, breaking one of the valve seats, the partition between the steam and the exhaust. We were then taken in tow by the R. B. Forbes, assisting with our one engine after disconnecting. On our way down we encountered
Port Royal Sound (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
gaged. If Gen. Ripley had been appointed a general in command two months sooner, every thing would have been in a better state of preparation. But these two previous months were wasted in doing nothing for our defence. Within the time left to him, Gen. Ripley did all that untiring energy and skill could accomplish, to put our coast in a state of preparation. The two islands of Hilton Head and Bay Point, with their extreme limits, constitute the two points which guard the entrance to Port Royal Sound, about three miles in width. On these two points two forts were erected--Fort Walker on Hilton Head, and Fort Beauregard on Bay Point. The time we possessed enabled us to make them only earthworks, without any protection from shells or bombs. The island of Hilton Head was commanded by Gen. Drayton. The officers immediately superintending the artillery and conducting the fire of Fort Walker, were Col. Wagoner, Major Arthur Huger, and Capt. Yates, of the regular service, especially
Hilton Head, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
of Capt. Gilmore. The following is Capt. Gilmore's report of the first reconnaissance of Hilton Head: Official Document.--First Reconnoissance of Hilton Head Island, S. C., made on Friday, Nov. 7, 1861, by Capt. Q. A. Gilmore, Chief Engineer E. C., escorted by the Seventh Connecticut Regiment, Col. Terry. office of Chief E Nov. 8. Brig.-Gen. Wright, Commanding Forces on Hilton Head, S. C.: sir: In obedience to your directions of this date, to proceed on a reconnoissance of Hilton Head Island, or so much thereof as I could examine, returning to Headquarters on the same day, I have to report a completion of the day's operations under the escort prcountering any of the enemy or any white person whatever. From what I can gather from negroes, there are no rebel troops on any of the northern portions of Hilton Head Island. About three hundred of them, with some wounded, passed over the road last night, about the time we were disembarking. They were under the influence of
Seabrook Landing (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
roper to exercise great caution against surprise, and accordingly requested Col. Terry to cover the advance of the main body of escort by skirmishers. Over a very considerable portion of the route we took to Seabrook Point, the one running through the woods beyond Gen. Drayton's plantations, as distinguished from the one near the shore, skirmishers could not be deployed, as both sides of the road are lined by an impenetrable jungle. Our progress was necessarily quite slow. We reached Seabrook Landing about two o'clock P. M., without encountering any of the enemy or any white person whatever. From what I can gather from negroes, there are no rebel troops on any of the northern portions of Hilton Head Island. About three hundred of them, with some wounded, passed over the road last night, about the time we were disembarking. They were under the influence of a terrible panic — knapsacks, haversacks, canteens, cartridge-boxes, &c., &c., were found scattered over the road, and on th
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 36
ion, Port Royal, S. C., Nov. 8, 1861. To the Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.: sir: I have the honor to report that the force under my command embar T. W. Sherman, Brigadier-General Commanding. Adjutant-General U. S. A., Washington, D. C. Commodore Dupont's reports. flag-ship Wabash, off Hilton head, Prt Royal harbor, November 6, 1861. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington: sir: The Government having determined to seize and occupy one or more imprt Royal harbor, Nov. 8, 1861. The Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington: sir: I have the honor to inform you that yesterday I attacked the batteri Atlantic Squadron. Letter of the Secretary of war. Navy Department, Washington, Nov. 16. sir: It is with no ordinary emotion that I tender to you and youhe Pocahontas. The subjoined private letter was addressed to his father in Washington, by a non-commissioned officer on board the United States steamer Pocahontas,
Augusta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
make a long story short, he is perfect master of his profession in my opinion, second to none, and so considered by all on board the Unadilla. On the morning of the 7th November at nine o'clock the signal was made from the flag-ship to get under way, a signal we had been watching anxiously for some time. I never saw an anchor come up livelier in my life. We then started up the bay in the following order: Wabash, Susquehanna, Seminole, Mohican, Pawnee, Unadilla, Ottawa, Seneca, Pembina, Augusta, Bienville, Curlew, Penguin, Pocahontas, Isaac Smith, and R. B. Forbes. The two batteries are called Forts Beauregard and Walker. The former on the right, on Bay Point, the other on the left, on Hilton Head. The former mounting eighteen guns, and the other twenty-two, and big ones, too--ten-inch columbiads and eighty pounders, rifled. We commenced on Fort Beauregard and so round to Fort Walker, keeping under weigh and going round, first one fort and then the other. The ball opened at
Saint Helena Island, S.C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
nt of Fort Beauregard was equally a necessity. The garrison were exhausted, and in momentary danger of being cut off. When Colonel Dunovant ordered a retreat, tears of mortification and indignation filled the eyes of Capt. Elliott at the sad necessity. The retreat was admirably conducted, and rendered entirely successful by the prudent energy of Capt. Hanckel, one of Gen. Ripley's aids, who had got together some twelve flats at Station Creek, by which the troops passed safely over to St. Helena Island. From there they passed to Beaufort Island, and reached the train at Pocotaligo without the loss or injury of a man. In this fort none were killed, and but five were wounded, and two of these were wounded by negligence in loading a cannon, by which hot shot was driven on the powder without the wet wad preceding it. The rest of the story is briefly told. Late on Thursday night the garrison of Fort Walker had collected at the landing, in the hope of being able to reach Bluffton by w
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