hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 1,000 0 Browse Search
Doc 512 0 Browse Search
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) 394 0 Browse Search
Missouri (Missouri, United States) 218 0 Browse Search
Columbus, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) 197 17 Browse Search
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) 197 9 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 196 16 Browse Search
Hilton Head (South Carolina, United States) 170 2 Browse Search
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) 158 0 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 150 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 247 total hits in 123 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Evansville (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 49
the hill three miles in our advance. Early in the morning they were cut off and fired into by about five hundred of the enemy, and they fell into ambush; but not knowing that they were entirely cut off, and by such a force, George Weinder, of Evansville, started to Headquarters for reinforcements, but had gone but a few rods when a heavy volley from the roadside was poured upon him, and he fell dead. Then at the earnest solicitation of a private, who has performed some daring feats with the e, uttering the most horrid imprecations concerning Yankees and abolitionists. Looking out of one eye slightly opened, he saw when they were gone, then arose and came to camp. One of the foemen, however, did turn aside to pursue Ira Duncan, of Evansville, cheering for Jeff. Davis. But he not being of the proper material either to run from or surrender to a single traitor, when his pursuer was within a few feet of him, turned round, and they both at the same moment raised their guns to their fa
Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 49
Captain Lamb; Company K, Captain McCutcheon; and Company H, under Lieutenant Werner, all of the Fifteenth Indiana Volunteers. Lieutenant Driscoll of the Third Ohio Volunteers, volunteered to lead a scouting party, consisting of ten Indiana and ten Ohio riflemen. Lieutenant Bedford, acting Captain of our scouts, volunteered to accompany the expedition. The cavalry was taken from Captain Bracken's Indiana company. Slept the first night on our arms, with half the command awake at a time, with noone of them previously, as he said, uttering a short prayer for his victim, whose chest was then burst open by his annihilating Minie ball; the other man's gun failing to discharge, they took the two living secesh prisoners, and recaptured the two Ohio boys. Indeed, I believe there were a few men of the Twenty-fourth Ohio who came up and rendered slight service at the conclusion of the action. This afternoon the remains of Junod and Weinder were carried in by their companions in peril, they
Randolph (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 49
B, Fourteenth Indiana, and Lieutenant John T. Wood of Company H, Twenty-fifth Ohio, whose steady coolness and daring example had great force in keeping the deployed line unbroken, and in causing so destructive a fire to be poured upon the enemy. I have the honor to be, Colonel, very respect-fully, your obedient servant, David J. Higgins, Capt. Co. C, Twenty-fourth Ohio Infantry, Commanding Scout. Geo. S. Rose, Assistant Adj.-Gen. Report of Lieut.-Col. Owen. camp Elk water, Randolph Co., Va., September 18, 1861. Col. G. D Wagner, Commanding Fifteenth Regiment Indiana Volunteers: sir: In accordance with your order to proceed on the Manlia Turnpike until I met the enemy, but not to bring on a general engagement, I marched my command of two hundred and eighty-five infantry and four dragoons, (the latter designed to be used as messengers,) on Sunday, the 8th September, at noon, out of camp, under the guidance of Dr. Singer, a Union Virginian, who, having formerly practised
Cheat River (United States) (search for this): chapter 49
t station, which point was occupied by Lieut. Junod, Company E, Fourteenth Indiana. The enemy surrounded Junod's command consisting of thirty-five men, with a force five hundred strong, and killed Lieut. Junod and one private; the others have all come into camp. I soon found that Capts. Brooks and Williamson were driving the enemy to my right flank. I then despatched two companies--one from the Fourteenth Indiana, Co. A, Capt. Foote, and one from the Twenty-fourth Ohio, Capt.----, up Cheat River, to cut off the enemy's retreat. My captains met the enemy two miles above the bridge, scattering them and killing several; captured two prisoners, and retaking one of the wagoners taken early in the morning. The enemy's force on my right flank consisted of the Twenty-fifth Virginia, Col. Heck, Twenty-third, Thirty-first and Thirty-seventh, and also one battalion of Virginians under command of Col. Taliafero. The force which met Capt. Higgins and Lieuts. Green and Wood, consisted of th
Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 49
inian, who, having formerly practised in this and adjoining counties, was thoroughly acquainted with all the localities. The infantry consisted of portions of Company B, Captain Wing, Third Ohio; Company A, Captain Rice; Company C, Captain Comparet; Company E, Captain Lamb; Company K, Captain McCutcheon; and Company H, under Lieutenant Werner, all of the Fifteenth Indiana Volunteers. Lieutenant Driscoll of the Third Ohio Volunteers, volunteered to lead a scouting party, consisting of ten Indiana and ten Ohio riflemen. Lieutenant Bedford, acting Captain of our scouts, volunteered to accompany the expedition. The cavalry was taken from Captain Bracken's Indiana company. Slept the first night on our arms, with half the command awake at a time, with no fires and perfectly silent. After picketing wherever the cross roads pointed out by Dr. Dyer seemed to demand it, we proceeded at four o'clock P. M., on the 9th instant, toward the Confederate camp at Marshall's store, carefully scou
Vincennes (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 49
chments of companies before named, the slaughter of rebels was terrible. They were stupid, or spell-bound, or in some way mysteriously affected, so that they fired only an occasional shot, and that but poorly aimed, while our boys, and especially Lieut. Greene, with his gallant twenty-five of the Old Post Guards, with a spirit and vim only exhibited by hoosier boys, (or buckeyes,) pursued them, strewing the pass and the mountains with their slain. On the previous evening Capt. Coon, of Vincennes, with detachments from the different regiments, (sixty men in all,) had been sent some seven miles to the southeast, and to our rear, to picket a bridle path leading from a point on the pass three miles west of us, across to Wagner's camp. Early in the morning he found himself cut off by the twenty-five hundred rebels before mentioned, they being widely scattered over the mountains between here and the camp. Then and there he called up his command, and put the question: Shall we cut our
Cheat Mountain (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 49
Doc. 48. operations in Cheat Mountain, Va. Report of Gen. Reynolds. Headquarters First Brigade I. Vts, who made their way to the right and rear of Cheat Mountain, took a position on the road leading to Huttonv, advanced by the Staunton Pike on the front of Cheat Mountain, and threw two regiments to the right and rear of Cheat Mountain, which united with the three regiments from the other column of the enemy. (The two posts, Water, and threw him into the rear and right of Cheat Mountain, the companies retiring to the pass at the footGeneral. Colonel Kimball's report camp Cheat Mountain Summit, W. V., September 14, 1861. Brig.-Gen. JGeneral. Report of D. J. Higgins. camp Cheat Mountain Summit, September 17, 1861. Col. N. Kimball, Co Letter from an Indiana volunteer. camp Cheat Mountain Summit, Sept. 13, 4 o'clock P. M. Within the thirty-six hours we have had stirring times on Cheat Mountain. But the Star-Spangled Banner still waves, and
wo miles above the bridge, scattering them and killing several; captured two prisoners, and retaking one of the wagoners taken early in the morning. The enemy's force on my right flank consisted of the Twenty-fifth Virginia, Col. Heck, Twenty-third, Thirty-first and Thirty-seventh, and also one battalion of Virginians under command of Col. Taliafero. The force which met Capt. Higgins and Lieuts. Green and Wood, consisted of the First Tennessee, Col. George Manny; the Seventh Tennessee, Col. R. Hadden, the Fourteenth Tennessee, Col. Forbes, mustering in all three thousand, commanded by Gen. Anderson. The aggregate of the enemy's force was near fifty-five hundred; ours, which engaged and repulsed them, was less than three hundred. We killed near one hundred of the enemy, and wounded a greater number, and have thirteen prisoners. We recaptured all our teamsters and others whom the enemy had captured in the morning. We have lost a few noble fellows, killed, among whom is Lieu
Report of Lieut.-Col. Owen. camp Elk water, Randolph Co., Va., September 18, 1861. Col. G. D Wagner, Commanding Fifteenth Regiment Indiana Volunteers: sir: In accordance with your order to proceed on the Manlia Turnpike until I met the enemy, but not to bring on a general engagement, I marched my command of two hundred and eighty-five infantry and four dragoons, (the latter designed to be used as messengers,) on Sunday, the 8th September, at noon, out of camp, under the guidance of Dr. Singer, a Union Virginian, who, having formerly practised in this and adjoining counties, was thoroughly acquainted with all the localities. The infantry consisted of portions of Company B, Captain Wing, Third Ohio; Company A, Captain Rice; Company C, Captain Comparet; Company E, Captain Lamb; Company K, Captain McCutcheon; and Company H, under Lieutenant Werner, all of the Fifteenth Indiana Volunteers. Lieutenant Driscoll of the Third Ohio Volunteers, volunteered to lead a scouting party, con
r, at noon, out of camp, under the guidance of Dr. Singer, a Union Virginian, who, having formerly practised in this and adjoining counties, was thoroughly acquainted with all the localities. The infantry consisted of portions of Company B, Captain Wing, Third Ohio; Company A, Captain Rice; Company C, Captain Comparet; Company E, Captain Lamb; Company K, Captain McCutcheon; and Company H, under Lieutenant Werner, all of the Fifteenth Indiana Volunteers. Lieutenant Driscoll of the Third Ohio V the cross roads pointed out by Dr. Dyer seemed to demand it, we proceeded at four o'clock P. M., on the 9th instant, toward the Confederate camp at Marshall's store, carefully scouring the laurel bushes. Immediately after the main body, with Captain Wing, in the advance guard, emerged from a dense thicket which lined each side of the road. Our scouts commenced firing, having come so close to the enemy, and so suddenly, that a hand-to-hand scuffle ensued between private Edwards of the Fifteent
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...