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North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 61
he high and responsible position to which he has been called. Lieut.-Col. Toland, from the part he executed during the entire engagement, demonstrated fully that he has courage to fight and ability to command. During the engagement the peculiar whistling of Minie balls was heard at that part of the column where Cols. Piatt and Toland were commanding. There were found two Mississippi rifles, which were aimed at our worthy commanders; but our colonels were protected, while Col. Davis of North Carolina fell, engaged in sustaining an unholy rebellion. The enemy's loss was thirty killed and fifty wounded. We regret to know that four of our men were killed and eight wounded. The killed are as follows: George Robinson, Company A; home Amelia, Clermont County, Ohio, Joseph Harvey, Company H; Cincinnati, O., Jeremiah Hullinger, Allen County, O., and Jefferson Black, Cir-cleville, Auglaize County, Ohio; both of Company I. Seriously wounded: John Essex, Isaac Z. Bryant, Henry A. Masse
Amelia, Clermont County, Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 61
nie balls was heard at that part of the column where Cols. Piatt and Toland were commanding. There were found two Mississippi rifles, which were aimed at our worthy commanders; but our colonels were protected, while Col. Davis of North Carolina fell, engaged in sustaining an unholy rebellion. The enemy's loss was thirty killed and fifty wounded. We regret to know that four of our men were killed and eight wounded. The killed are as follows: George Robinson, Company A; home Amelia, Clermont County, Ohio, Joseph Harvey, Company H; Cincinnati, O., Jeremiah Hullinger, Allen County, O., and Jefferson Black, Cir-cleville, Auglaize County, Ohio; both of Company I. Seriously wounded: John Essex, Isaac Z. Bryant, Henry A. Massey. Slightly: Second Lieut. R. B. Underwood, B. A. Harper, J. G. Young, Jacob Genagi, Henry W. Price, and G. R. Wait. We hope every report from the Thirty-fourth Ohio, Piatt Zouaves, may be better, until rebellion shall be crushed and peace and harmony res
Cole River (United States) (search for this): chapter 61
s command, of the Thirty-fourth regiment, about five hundred and fifty men, while Lieut.-Col. Enyart had three hundred of the First Kentucky, and two hundred Home Guards of Virginia. The forces moved together until they reached Peytona, on the Cole River, where they separated, Col. Enyart going up the Cole River. Col. Enyart did not meet the enemy in force at any place, but his men did meet and ford swollen rivers, and marched on short rations, and were anxious to meet with the running enemy ofCole River. Col. Enyart did not meet the enemy in force at any place, but his men did meet and ford swollen rivers, and marched on short rations, and were anxious to meet with the running enemy of old Virginia. Col. Enyart did not join Col. Piatt until they met on the Kanawha, on their return. Col. Piatt's command immediately proceeded thence to Boone Court House, and encamped that night one mile beyond. The next day, after proceeding some sixteen miles, they came up with the advance guard of the enemy, consisting of cavalry, when a brisk fire was exchanged, the cavalry retreating. After the retreat of cavalry the battalion was immediately put in order of battle. The advance guard o
Portsmouth, Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 61
aves had with the rebels near Chapmansville, Va. camp Enyart, Kanawha, Oct. 2. Eds. Com.: The Zouave Thirty-fourth regiment, Ohio, have had a chance to show their metal. This was on Wednesday, on Kanawha Gap, near Chapmansville, Va. After marching forty-two miles, they came upon the enemy, who were behind breastworks, but could not stand our boys' steady fire, for they retreated in utter consternation, their Col. J. W. Davis, of Greenbrier, Va., (but the traitor is a native of Portsmouth, Ohio,) being mortally wounded. We killed twenty, took three prisoners, a secesh flag twenty feet long, with Fiftren Stars, four horses, one wagon, ten rifles, (one of which I claim,) twelve muskets, and commissary stores, (very low.) We lost three killed, nine wounded; one since died. The rout of the enemy was complete, although they had a brave and a skilful commander, and strong position, with two days information of our intentions. They fled the moment their commander fell. The fight
Auglaize (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 61
ere aimed at our worthy commanders; but our colonels were protected, while Col. Davis of North Carolina fell, engaged in sustaining an unholy rebellion. The enemy's loss was thirty killed and fifty wounded. We regret to know that four of our men were killed and eight wounded. The killed are as follows: George Robinson, Company A; home Amelia, Clermont County, Ohio, Joseph Harvey, Company H; Cincinnati, O., Jeremiah Hullinger, Allen County, O., and Jefferson Black, Cir-cleville, Auglaize County, Ohio; both of Company I. Seriously wounded: John Essex, Isaac Z. Bryant, Henry A. Massey. Slightly: Second Lieut. R. B. Underwood, B. A. Harper, J. G. Young, Jacob Genagi, Henry W. Price, and G. R. Wait. We hope every report from the Thirty-fourth Ohio, Piatt Zouaves, may be better, until rebellion shall be crushed and peace and harmony restored. Cole. The fight of the Piatt Zouaves. The following letter is exclusively devoted to the fight which the Piatt Zouaves had with
Boone Court House (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 61
Guards of Virginia. The forces moved together until they reached Peytona, on the Cole River, where they separated, Col. Enyart going up the Cole River. Col. Enyart did not meet the enemy in force at any place, but his men did meet and ford swollen rivers, and marched on short rations, and were anxious to meet with the running enemy of old Virginia. Col. Enyart did not join Col. Piatt until they met on the Kanawha, on their return. Col. Piatt's command immediately proceeded thence to Boone Court House, and encamped that night one mile beyond. The next day, after proceeding some sixteen miles, they came up with the advance guard of the enemy, consisting of cavalry, when a brisk fire was exchanged, the cavalry retreating. After the retreat of cavalry the battalion was immediately put in order of battle. The advance guard of fifteen men was led forward by Adjt. Clarke, proceeding along the road. Scouts were sent out on either side of the road to meet and repulse the sharpshooters o
West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 61
Doc. 59 1/2. skirmish near Chapmansville, Va., September 25, 1861. The correspondent of the Cincinnati Gazette gives the following account of this skirmish: camp Enyart, October 1, 1861. The necessities for aid in Western Virginia led the Government to order the Thirty-fourth regiment into the field before the brigade of Zouaves was completed. This to the officers was a great disappointment, as the drill is peculiar, rendering their cooperation a very important element of their efficiency and success. Yet, like true soldiers, they responded to the call with the regiment completed, and marched for Western Virginia with a notice of six hours, and reached Camp Enyart Thursday the 19th of September. The officers, believing that the best drill they could give the Zouaves would be to let them go through their peculiar tactics with a rebel army for interested spectators, and learning that the enemy was in force about fifty miles from their camp, took up their line of march
Chapmansville (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 61
Doc. 59 1/2. skirmish near Chapmansville, Va., September 25, 1861. The correspondent of the Cincinnati Gazette gives the following account of this skirmish: camp Enyart, October 1, 1861. The necessities for aid in Western Virginia led uaves. The following letter is exclusively devoted to the fight which the Piatt Zouaves had with the rebels near Chapmansville, Va. camp Enyart, Kanawha, Oct. 2. Eds. Com.: The Zouave Thirty-fourth regiment, Ohio, have had a chance to show their metal. This was on Wednesday, on Kanawha Gap, near Chapmansville, Va. After marching forty-two miles, they came upon the enemy, who were behind breastworks, but could not stand our boys' steady fire, for they retreated in utter consternatioonel lay mortally wounded, deserted by all his men but one. Our whole column finally marched into the little town of Chapmansville, formerly Headquarters of the enemy, and camped for the night. In my next I may describe our homeward march — or,
Greenbrier (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 61
lusively devoted to the fight which the Piatt Zouaves had with the rebels near Chapmansville, Va. camp Enyart, Kanawha, Oct. 2. Eds. Com.: The Zouave Thirty-fourth regiment, Ohio, have had a chance to show their metal. This was on Wednesday, on Kanawha Gap, near Chapmansville, Va. After marching forty-two miles, they came upon the enemy, who were behind breastworks, but could not stand our boys' steady fire, for they retreated in utter consternation, their Col. J. W. Davis, of Greenbrier, Va., (but the traitor is a native of Portsmouth, Ohio,) being mortally wounded. We killed twenty, took three prisoners, a secesh flag twenty feet long, with Fiftren Stars, four horses, one wagon, ten rifles, (one of which I claim,) twelve muskets, and commissary stores, (very low.) We lost three killed, nine wounded; one since died. The rout of the enemy was complete, although they had a brave and a skilful commander, and strong position, with two days information of our intentions. They
Peytona (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 61
em go through their peculiar tactics with a rebel army for interested spectators, and learning that the enemy was in force about fifty miles from their camp, took up their line of march early Monday morning, having been in camp but three days. Col. Piatt had under his command, of the Thirty-fourth regiment, about five hundred and fifty men, while Lieut.-Col. Enyart had three hundred of the First Kentucky, and two hundred Home Guards of Virginia. The forces moved together until they reached Peytona, on the Cole River, where they separated, Col. Enyart going up the Cole River. Col. Enyart did not meet the enemy in force at any place, but his men did meet and ford swollen rivers, and marched on short rations, and were anxious to meet with the running enemy of old Virginia. Col. Enyart did not join Col. Piatt until they met on the Kanawha, on their return. Col. Piatt's command immediately proceeded thence to Boone Court House, and encamped that night one mile beyond. The next day, aft
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