hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 1,000 0 Browse Search
Doc 512 0 Browse Search
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) 394 0 Browse Search
Missouri (Missouri, United States) 218 0 Browse Search
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) 197 9 Browse Search
Columbus, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) 197 17 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 196 16 Browse Search
Hilton Head (South Carolina, United States) 170 2 Browse Search
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) 158 0 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 150 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 111 total hits in 35 results.

1 2 3 4
Roanoke Island (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 74
y the Susquehanna, as she is about leaving for Hampton Roads to coal. Norfolk day Book account: Captain Carrsville, of the Craville Guards, Third Georgia regiment, gives us the following statement: Colonel Wright left Camp Georgia, Roanoke Island, on Thursday, midnight, and arrived at Chicamacomico on Friday, October 4th. Col. Wright made the attack on the Federals at nine o'clock in the morning, by firing shell from two ten-pound howitzers from on board the transport Cotton Plant, wh, consisting of three hundred tents, carriage boxes, haversacks, canteens, cooking utensils, provisions, etc., together with their private wardrobe, which they were in too great haste to take with them. The entire expedition then returned to Roanoke Island, where they arrived on Sunday night at twelve o'clock. The Day Book gives the following particulars: The Twentieth Indiana regiment was drawn up on shore, preparatory to giving our forces battle, probably to frighten them off; but seein
Hampton Roads (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 74
nds, that, before the boat was near enough to take them, they both plunged into the surf, and, while the boat was picking Haver out of the water, Charles White was drowned. Although a good swimmer, he was so exhausted for want of food, and by the exertions put forth to gain his liberty, that he sank, to rise no more, which was rather a hard fate to meet after succeeding so well in freeing himself from the enemy. I must close this, to send by the Susquehanna, as she is about leaving for Hampton Roads to coal. Norfolk day Book account: Captain Carrsville, of the Craville Guards, Third Georgia regiment, gives us the following statement: Colonel Wright left Camp Georgia, Roanoke Island, on Thursday, midnight, and arrived at Chicamacomico on Friday, October 4th. Col. Wright made the attack on the Federals at nine o'clock in the morning, by firing shell from two ten-pound howitzers from on board the transport Cotton Plant, when about one mile from the shore. As soon as the col
Croatan Sound (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 74
steamer Monticello. To Captain J. L. Lardner, Commanding U. S. steamer Susquehanna, off Cape Hatteras, N. C. New York Herald narrative. Hatteras Inlet, October 7. On the morning of the 4th inst., about daylight, the lookouts of Colonel Brown's encampment, consisting of about eight hundred men of the Twentieth Indiana regiment, located some thirty miles above Fort Hatteras, reported six rebel steamers, with schooners and flat-boats in tow, all loaded with troops, coming out of Croatan Sound, and steering straight for the encampment. The colonel immediately despatched a courier to inform Colonel Hawkins, at Fort Hatteras, of his situation, stating that he would retreat to the light-house on the Cape, and there make a stand. The steamers landed about fifteen hundred men three miles above Colonel Brown, and then came on down, throwing shells into the tents, destroying them, also a house which had been used as a hospital, killing what sick remained therein. They then passe
Pamlico Sound (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 74
nded. Hundreds of the rebels were seen to wade out into the sound up to their necks, and when they would hear a shell coming they would crouch down under the water, and remain as long as they could, and then poke up their heads and listen for the approach of the next messenger of death, and repeat the operation. A more perfect trap could not well have been arranged for their destruction. The belt of land where they were discovered is not more than a third of a mile wide, and separates Pamlico Sound from the ocean. Their steamers attempted to come in close enough to take them off; but a shell or two sent ploughing after them induced them to keep at a safe distance, and their troops were left to their fate. As soon as night set in the Monticello ceased firing. During the night they must have embarked, as the following morning discovered no traces of their presence. It is very unfortunate that Colonel Hawkins did not march up the beach under the cover of the guns of the Monticello
Cape Hatteras (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 74
obedient servant, J. L. Lardner, Captain. To Flag-officer L. M. Goldsborough, &c., &c. Report of Commander Braine. United States ship Monticello, off Cape Hatteras, October 5, 1861. sir: I have the honor to inform you that, in obedience to your order of this morning, I stood through the inner channel of Hatteras shoalsobedient servant, Lieutenant D. L. Braine, Commanding United States steamer Monticello. To Captain J. L. Lardner, Commanding U. S. steamer Susquehanna, off Cape Hatteras, N. C. New York Herald narrative. Hatteras Inlet, October 7. On the morning of the 4th inst., about daylight, the lookouts of Colonel Brown's encampme at anchor to protect the troops against such superior numbers as were supposed to be in pursuit of them. He at the same time ordered the Monticello to double Cape Hatteras, and proceed close along the shore, and see if he could discover any traces of the enemy. He had proceeded but a short distance when the rebels were discovere
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 74
70. the Chicamacomico engagement. Official report of Captain Lardner. the following are the official reports of the engagement near Hatteras Inlet: United States steam frigate Susquehanna, off Hatteras Inlet, October 6, 1861. sir: Late in the afternoon of the 4th instant, I received information that the enemy had lan. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, J. L. Lardner, Captain. To Flag-officer L. M. Goldsborough, &c., &c. Report of Commander Braine. United States ship Monticello, off Cape Hatteras, October 5, 1861. sir: I have the honor to inform you that, in obedience to your order of this morning, I stood through t enclose herewith the memorandum of the amount of ammunition expended to-day. I am, respectfully, your obedient servant, Lieutenant D. L. Braine, Commanding United States steamer Monticello. To Captain J. L. Lardner, Commanding U. S. steamer Susquehanna, off Cape Hatteras, N. C. New York Herald narrative. Hatteras Inlet
Chicamacomico (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 74
sir: Late in the afternoon of the 4th instant, I received information that the enemy had landed in large force at Chicamacomico and Kine Keet, and that the Indiana regiment, posted there, was in full retreat before them. Also, that our three tus the following statement: Colonel Wright left Camp Georgia, Roanoke Island, on Thursday, midnight, and arrived at Chicamacomico on Friday, October 4th. Col. Wright made the attack on the Federals at nine o'clock in the morning, by firing shell fbelow Kinnykeet, to intercept the retreat of the Federalists. Kinnykeet is eight miles below the light-house, toward Chicamacomico. They were unable to land, owing to the shoal water, though they did every thing they could to acccomplish that objeve below the high-water mark. Our men had to drag their field-howitzers through this sand twelve miles--that is from Chicamacomico to Hatteras Light; and during the chase, one member of the Georgia regiment died from exhaustion in pursuing the Yank
Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 74
helling also two sloops. We continued firing deliberately upon them from half-past 1 P. M. until half-past 3 P. M., when two men were discovered on the sea-beach making signals to us. Supposing them to be two of the Indiana regiment, we sent an armed boat and crew to bring them off, covering them at the same time with our fire. Upon the boat nearing the beach they took to the water. One of them was successful in reaching the boat--Private Warren O. Haver, Company H, Twentieth regiment of Indiana troops. The other man--Private Charles White, Company H, Twentieth regiment Indiana troops — was unfortunately drowned in the surf. Private Haver informs me that he was taken prisoner on the morning of the 4th; that he witnessed our shot, which was very destructive. He states that two of our shells fell into two sloops loaded with men, blowing the vessels to pieces and sinking them. Also that several of the officers were killed and their horses seen running about the track. He had ju
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 74
troops, from the Cotton Plant, having effected a landing, put out down the beach in pursuit of the flying Yankees; but they, being entirely too fleet of foot for them, escaped to Hatteras Light-house, where they were reinforced. At the time of the retreat of the Yankees, had it been high tide, they would not have escaped, as the sand was of such a nature as to utterly preclude the possibility of running, save below the high-water mark. Our men had to drag their field-howitzers through this sand twelve miles--that is from Chicamacomico to Hatteras Light; and during the chase, one member of the Georgia regiment died from exhaustion in pursuing the Yankees. His remains were brought to Norfolk by the Junaluska. A sergeant-major of the Indiana regiment shot the horse of Col. Wright of the Georgia regiment from under him, which appeared to be the only evidence of bravery evinced by the whole party. Col. Wright captured this man, and for his bravery treated him very courteously.
Thomas Jones (search for this): chapter 74
the transport Cotton Plant, when about one mile from the shore. As soon as the colonel opened fire, they began to retreat. The howitzers were commanded by Lieutenant J. R Sturgis, with forty men. When the colonel saw they were about to retreat, he embarked the guns of his three companies on board of a flat-boat, for the purpose of effecting a landing and putting chase after them. Company H, commanded by Capt. Nesmit, Company E, commanded by Captain Griffin, and Company N, commanded by Captain Jones, were landed immediately, leaving the remaining portion of the Third Georgia regiment, and the North Carolina regiment, some four or five miles in the rear, on board the other vessels of the fleet. The three companies that landed consisted of two hundred and ten men, while the enemy, from their muster-rolls, were about one thousand two hundred strong. When the colonel landed, he had signalled the remaining portion of the Georgia Third to advance, and, when near shore, they commenced
1 2 3 4