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Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 8
taken at Fort Hatteras discloses the fact that the commanding officers there have been three months standing in the same relation to the general staff of the army, as, it is notorious, several of our general officers have stood to the staff in Washington Lieut. Sharpe, another prisoner, is a citizen of Norfolk. He, like Mr. Barron, wore the United States naval uniform. Other than these, I believe that none of the prisoners have ever been officers of the regular army or navy establishment, thoed strength of our coast defences amounted to. What does the entrance of the Yankees into our waters amount to? It amounts to this: The whole of the eastern part of the State is now exposed to the ravages of the merciless vandals. Newbern, Washington, Plymouth, Edenton, Hertford, Elizabeth City, are all now exposed, besides the whole of the adjacent country. The strength of the Yankee forces already landed is not definitely known. It is supposed to be about eight thousand men. Our State
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
manding the naval force for the defence of North Carolina and Virginia, and Colonel Martin, commandi. S. Navy, Com'g Naval Forces Virginia and North Carolina. William F. Martin, Colonel Seventh Light commanding naval defences of Virginia and North Carolina; Wm. F. Martin, Colonel Seventh regiment ona, Tar River boys; deeply The Coast of North Carolina. lacerated wound, involving deltoid muscl. 5. Matthias Sawyer, aged 23, a native of North Carolina, North Carolina defenders; contused wound bance. 6. Logan Metts, aged 18, native of North Carolina, Lenoir braves; slight flesh-wound of middding the commander, Barron, and one of the North Carolina Cabinet, one thousand stand of arms, and stember 1, 1861. To the Adjutant-General of North Carolina: sir: I beg leave to report that after a sort of natural outwork of the coast of North Carolina, and it has been the principal rendezvous ke in an hour. It is the key to the whole North Carolina coast; it is the backdoor to Norfolk and t[21 more...]
Beaufort, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
annel is buoyed out, any vessel may carry fifteen feet water over it with ease. Once inside, there is a safe harbor and anchorage in all weathers. From there the whole coast of Virginia and North Carolina, from Norfolk to Cape Lookout, is within our reach, by light draft vessels, which cannot possibly live at sea during the winter months. From it offensive operations may be made upon the whole coast of North Carolina to Bogue Inlet, extending many miles inland to Washington, Newbern, and Beaufort. In the language of the chief engineer of the rebels, Colonel Thompson, in an official report, it is the key of the Albemarle. In my judgment it is a station second in importance only to Fortress Monroe on this coast. As a depot for coaling and supplies for the blockading squadron, it is invaluable. As a harbor for our coasting trade, or inlet from the winter storm, or from pirates, it is of the first importance. By holding it, Hatteras light may again send forth its cheering ray to th
Stuart (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
agen; George Peabody, Lieutenant R. B. Lowry; and tug Fanny, Lieutenant Pierce Crosby, all of the United States Navy. The transports Adelaide and George Peabody towing schooners with surf-boats on them, and the Monticello and Pawnee surf-boats only. Major-General Butler took passage in this ship; the transports having parts of two regiments, and one company of regulars, under the command of Colonels Max Weber and Hawkins, and Captain Larnard, United States army. At — P. M., passed Cape Henry, and discharged pilot; light airs from south and east, with a ground swell. Tuesday, 27th--Light airs from south and east, with a heavy ground swell. At half-past 9, A. M., Cape Hatteras light in sight, rounded the shoals off Hatteras, and at five P. M. anchored at the southward of the cape — the squadron in company. Hoisted out the surf-boats, and made preparations for landing troops in the morning. Wednesday 28th--Southerly winds; heavy surf rolling on the beach. Calling the m
North America (search for this): chapter 8
upon honor, that Lieutenant-Colonel Francis Weiss, of the above regiment, headed us in the assault on Fort Clark, near Camp Hatteras, on Wednesday, August 28th, between the hours of three and five o'clock in the afternoon; that he was the first one who entered, taking the secession flag from the rampart, and securing two six-pounders and five thirty-two pounders, during a very heavy fire between the enemy and our fleet for more than one hour and a half, in behalf of the United States of North America. We further testify that nobody except this body, respectfully signed, ever before us entered the above-named fort, and declare herewith, upon oath, that the flag which was taken personally by Lieut.-Col. F. Weiss is the true and right one which waved upon the fort, and was given them back by the United States Navy upon representation of this regiment, as a token of respect and acknowledgment for the important service so rendered. We further declare, upon oath if necessary, that if
Raleigh (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
n troops marched out, and having formed in line on the ramparts, the Stars and Stripes were raised and saluted. The troops were then removed to the Adelaide, and spent the night in the bay, leaving only forces enough in the fort to hold it. The next morning the prisoners were transferred to the Minnesota outside of the bay, and started for New York. --N. Y. Herald. Secession account. A correspondent of the Petersburg (Va.) Express, gives the following account of the attack: Raleigh, N. C., Friday, Aug. 30, 1861. dear Express: Sad are my feelings. The news from our coast of yesterday and to day is of a very sad character. Our coast is certainly in possession of the Yankees. They entered Hatteras Inlet on yesterday and took possession of our batteries and men there. From accounts, I suppose their entrance was effected with very little trouble. We had only one regiment, consisting of eight hundred men, stationed there and at Ocracoke Inlet. This was the Seventh regi
Edenton (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
arolina have been led to believe, through the Executive Department of the State, that our coast was in a very strong state of defence. How this has happened I know not, nor will I attempt to guess. But we see now what the boasted strength of our coast defences amounted to. What does the entrance of the Yankees into our waters amount to? It amounts to this: The whole of the eastern part of the State is now exposed to the ravages of the merciless vandals. Newbern, Washington, Plymouth, Edenton, Hertford, Elizabeth City, are all now exposed, besides the whole of the adjacent country. The strength of the Yankee forces already landed is not definitely known. It is supposed to be about eight thousand men. Our State is now plunged into a great deal of trouble, which certainly could have been avoided had the proper steps been taken. It was said publicly by a member of the Convention, during the late session, that if the Government had had nothing to do with the coast defence, but
Petersburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ter, felt greatly relieved, and were marched into the fort as the secession troops marched out, and having formed in line on the ramparts, the Stars and Stripes were raised and saluted. The troops were then removed to the Adelaide, and spent the night in the bay, leaving only forces enough in the fort to hold it. The next morning the prisoners were transferred to the Minnesota outside of the bay, and started for New York. --N. Y. Herald. Secession account. A correspondent of the Petersburg (Va.) Express, gives the following account of the attack: Raleigh, N. C., Friday, Aug. 30, 1861. dear Express: Sad are my feelings. The news from our coast of yesterday and to day is of a very sad character. Our coast is certainly in possession of the Yankees. They entered Hatteras Inlet on yesterday and took possession of our batteries and men there. From accounts, I suppose their entrance was effected with very little trouble. We had only one regiment, consisting of eight hund
Annapolis (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ame. At the surrender we officiated in the ceremonies, after which the prisoners were brought to this vessel, and next day, the 30th instant, placed them on board the Minnesota, which vessel sailed at 2.30 P. M. for New York, and we left for Annapolis with Major-General Butler, U. S. A., and the wounded prisoners. I hope my endeavors in the case may meet your full approbation, and beg to recommend to your consideration the conduct of Lieut.-Com. R. B. Lowry, associated with me on this wor to be thoroughly convinced that they were all to be hanged — they have not yet found out what unconscionable liars their leaders are. In addition to the six hundred and ninety-two mentioned above, there are a dozen or so who are to be taken to Annapolis in the Adelaide, and quite a number severely wounded are to be cared for at the forts for the present. Fort Hatteras--the first work erected — appears to have been built rather to prevent small gunboats from entering the inlet than as a defe
Plymouth, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
of North Carolina have been led to believe, through the Executive Department of the State, that our coast was in a very strong state of defence. How this has happened I know not, nor will I attempt to guess. But we see now what the boasted strength of our coast defences amounted to. What does the entrance of the Yankees into our waters amount to? It amounts to this: The whole of the eastern part of the State is now exposed to the ravages of the merciless vandals. Newbern, Washington, Plymouth, Edenton, Hertford, Elizabeth City, are all now exposed, besides the whole of the adjacent country. The strength of the Yankee forces already landed is not definitely known. It is supposed to be about eight thousand men. Our State is now plunged into a great deal of trouble, which certainly could have been avoided had the proper steps been taken. It was said publicly by a member of the Convention, during the late session, that if the Government had had nothing to do with the coast defe
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