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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Bennington, Vt. (Vermont, United States) (search for this): chapter 86
ry thing ready for service at a moment's notice. The reports from my scouts during the night induced me to believe that the enemy might attack us during the day. I also went forward and suggested to the Quartermaster of the Thirteenth that the train be well closed up and kept so; after which nothing of importance occurred, until I arrived at Justice Bennington's, where I learned that Second Lieutenant Laughlin, of rebel Johnson's command, had come in home, and lived one mile north of said Bennington's, and had a lot of McClurg's goods in his house. I at once detached Captain Crockett and his company, to bring in the Lieutenant and search his place. The Captain had not been gone more than five minutes before I saw a courier coming from the front. I at once called Capt. Crockett back. The courier arrived from Maj. Bowen, stating that he had been attacked, and needed assistance. I at once ordered Capts. Montgomery and Switzler forward at full speed to the relief of Major Bowen. I
Rolla, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 86
tion near Henrytown on the 13th. The party detailed to scout the battlefield, and see that the dead were all buried, have returned, and report the whole number of the enemy killed sixty-two, instead of twenty-seven, as per my official report; also, the four mortally wounded have since died. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your most obedient servant, Clark Wright, Major Com. Fremont Battalion Cavalry. To Brig.-Gen. J. B. Wyman, Com. Brigade. Missouri Democrat account. Rolla, Oct. 16, 1861. The ambulances looked for from Springfield, came in to-day, bringing thirty-one of the men wounded in the Wilson Creek fight. Mr. Burns, of Springfield, and two ladies also came along in company with the ambulances. These people report that a sharp engagement took place Sunday morning between two companies of cavalry, belonging to Major Wright's battalion, attached to Wyman's expedition, and about three hundred mounted rebels, in which sixty of the latter were killed a
Pulaski (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 86
de him bite the dust. I append a partial list of the prisoners, with their names, rank, and residence: Henry Laughlin, Second Lieutenant, Company A, Johnson's regiment; A. H. Elbert, Second Sergeant, Company B; J. H. Bond, Fourth Sergeant, Company B; J. M. Nichols, Fifth Sergeant, Company B; W. E. Williams, Fifth Corporal, Company D; B. W. Giver, First Sergeant, Company E; J. M. Hunter, Second Sergeant, Company E; S. D. Keeny, First Corporal; Le Marze, private; J. J. Lane, private, Pulaski County; J. H. B. Clark, private; W. Winningham, private; J. R. Laughlin, private; S. Clark, private; H. M. Dickinson, private. All of which is respectfully submitted. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Clark Wright, Major Corn. Fremont Battalion. To Gen. Wyman Commanding. Burial of the dead.--Supplemental report. Headquarters camp McClurg, October 16, 1861. General: Enclosed please find Supplemental Report of the action near Henrytown on the 13t
Lebanon, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 86
Doc. 82. battle near Lebanon, Mo. Report of Major Wright. Headquarters camp----, October 13, 1861. General: At seven o'clock A. M., on the 18th, my command struck tents at Camp Conant, on Tavern Creek, and formed into column in rear of the train. I immediately passed along the line, and requested the officers to keep the men well closed up, and allow none to leave their places, but to keep every thing ready for service at a moment's notice. The reports from my scouts during the night induced me to believe that the enemy might attack us during the day. I also went forward and suggested to the Quartermaster of the Thirteenth that the train be well closed up and kept so; after which nothing of importance occurred, until I arrived at Justice Bennington's, where I learned that Second Lieutenant Laughlin, of rebel Johnson's command, had come in home, and lived one mile north of said Bennington's, and had a lot of McClurg's goods in his house. I at once detached Captain Cro
Tavern Creek (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 86
Doc. 82. battle near Lebanon, Mo. Report of Major Wright. Headquarters camp----, October 13, 1861. General: At seven o'clock A. M., on the 18th, my command struck tents at Camp Conant, on Tavern Creek, and formed into column in rear of the train. I immediately passed along the line, and requested the officers to keep the men well closed up, and allow none to leave their places, but to keep every thing ready for service at a moment's notice. The reports from my scouts during the night induced me to believe that the enemy might attack us during the day. I also went forward and suggested to the Quartermaster of the Thirteenth that the train be well closed up and kept so; after which nothing of importance occurred, until I arrived at Justice Bennington's, where I learned that Second Lieutenant Laughlin, of rebel Johnson's command, had come in home, and lived one mile north of said Bennington's, and had a lot of McClurg's goods in his house. I at once detached Captain Cro
Springfield, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 86
. Missouri Democrat account. Rolla, Oct. 16, 1861. The ambulances looked for from Springfield, came in to-day, bringing thirty-one of the men wounded in the Wilson Creek fight. Mr. Burns, of Springfield, and two ladies also came along in company with the ambulances. These people report that a sharp engagement took place Sunday morning between two companies of cavalry, belonging tthe most brilliant little exploits of the present campaign. Curious enough, the wounded from Springfield happened to be present, and eye-witnesses of the battle. It is from their point of view thatdifferent points, did not come in time to take part in the action, nor was it necessary. The Springfield men moved forward, accompanied some distance on the way by the cavalry. A truck broke down a companies of infantry, en route for their camp. Our loss was one killed--Henry Tucker, of Springfield, belonging to Wood's Kansas Rangers. He and one other belonging to Captain Wood's company we
ne company of Major Bowen's cavalry, (at his request,) and took position in the centre, as you found us on arrival. I observed at that time that the enemy were moving to the right. I ordered Capt. Crockett forward to support then, (knowing that they outnumbered us.) I then event to the right myself, found that Captains Switzler and Montgomery had formed a junction, and succeeded in flanking the enemy, and held them at bay. The enemy were commanded by Captains Lorrels, Wright, Thurman, Bell, Fain, and Hawthorn, and were drawn up in line of battle. My two companies threw themselves into line, and were ordered to receive their fire, return it steadily, and then charge with their sabres, and never allow the enemy time to reload their pieces, all of which order was carried out to the letter, with a coolness and determination that evinced true bravery, in both officers and men, and struck terror along the whole line. They could not stand such a charge, so prompt, so uniform, and so deter
M. Nichols, Fifth Sergeant, Company B; W. E. Williams, Fifth Corporal, Company D; B. W. Giver, First Sergeant, Company E; J. M. Hunter, Second Sergeant, Company E; S. D. Keeny, First Corporal; Le Marze, private; J. J. Lane, private, Pulaski County; J. H. B. Clark, private; W. Winningham, private; J. R. Laughlin, private; S. Clark, private; H. M. Dickinson, private. All of which is respectfully submitted. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Clark Wright, Major Corn. Fremont Battalion. To Gen. Wyman Commanding. Burial of the dead.--Supplemental report. Headquarters camp McClurg, October 16, 1861. General: Enclosed please find Supplemental Report of the action near Henrytown on the 13th. The party detailed to scout the battlefield, and see that the dead were all buried, have returned, and report the whole number of the enemy killed sixty-two, instead of twenty-seven, as per my official report; also, the four mortally wounded have since die
George Bell (search for this): chapter 86
e of one company of Major Bowen's cavalry, (at his request,) and took position in the centre, as you found us on arrival. I observed at that time that the enemy were moving to the right. I ordered Capt. Crockett forward to support then, (knowing that they outnumbered us.) I then event to the right myself, found that Captains Switzler and Montgomery had formed a junction, and succeeded in flanking the enemy, and held them at bay. The enemy were commanded by Captains Lorrels, Wright, Thurman, Bell, Fain, and Hawthorn, and were drawn up in line of battle. My two companies threw themselves into line, and were ordered to receive their fire, return it steadily, and then charge with their sabres, and never allow the enemy time to reload their pieces, all of which order was carried out to the letter, with a coolness and determination that evinced true bravery, in both officers and men, and struck terror along the whole line. They could not stand such a charge, so prompt, so uniform, and so
Frank Lewis (search for this): chapter 86
stating that he had been attacked, and needed assistance. I at once ordered Capts. Montgomery and Switzler forward at full speed to the relief of Major Bowen. I ordered the train corralled, and Captain Crockett to remain with his company to guard it until relieved by the infantry. I then despatched a courier to you for men to guard the train and support our cavalry; after which I went forward to the scene of action. I found Major Bowen some two miles forward, and one-half mile south of Mr. Lewis', on the Lebanon road. I immediately had a conference with Major Bowen, and we mutually agreed to the disposition of our forces and plan of attack. The rebels at the time occupied a high ridge immediately in our front, one-half mile south of us. The presumption was that we would have no immediate relief from the infantry in time to secure the rebels, and an immediate attack was resolved on. The disposition was as follows: Capt. Montgomery's company was already on the right, and ordered C
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