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Farmington, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 92
t back by Colonel Carlin, in command at the Knob, who, instead of forwarding troops, despatched the cars back to Mineral Point, with orders for the whole force there to report at once to him, as he was seriously threatened from the direction of Farmington. The train before going down ran up the road from Mineral Point to Blackwell's station, just at the bridge, in order to pick up the wounded and secure such baggage as the enemy had left. Mr. Kling says he found the bridge entirely destroyed, n was making every preparation in his power to give them a warm reception. His force consisted of the Twenty-first, Thirty-third, and Thirty-eighth Illinois, and a detachment of Indiana Cavalry. One company of the latter he had sent out toward Farmington, to ascertain the whereabouts and force of the rebels. There were rumors that Jeff. Thompson's force consisted of not less than ten thousand men, and one report came in just before Mr. Kling left, that they were but six miles off. Mr. Kling st
De Soto, Jefferson County, Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 92
ving done so speedily retired. Mr. Kling states that he and the express messenger forded Big River a short distance below the site of the bridge, and walked to De Soto, a distance of nine miles, where they found a transportation train on which they proceeded to this city. They left at De Soto the five companies of the Eighth WiDe Soto the five companies of the Eighth Wisconsin regiment, which were sent down the road Tuesday afternoon. When Mr. Kling left Pilot Knob Tuesday morning, an attack from the rebels was momentarily expected. Colonel Carlin was making every preparation in his power to give them a warm reception. His force consisted of the Twenty-first, Thirty-third, and Thirty-eighth thousand men, and one report came in just before Mr. Kling left, that they were but six miles off. Mr. Kling states that all of the bridges, from Mineral Point to De Soto, were deserted, the troops having been called on to Pilot Knob, and that it is in the power of the enemy to do the road an incalculable amount of injury. Jeff. T
Princeton, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 92
ebel force was a gang of Indians, or persons disguised as such, who, during the fight, kept up a great shouting. The sick and wounded of Captain Elliot's company were brought up to the city with him, and have a short leave of absence. The remainder of his company, fifty-two in number, are at Victoria. The following is the list of killed and wounded:--Killed, George G. Foster, Orderly Sergeant of Company E, from Galesburg, Ill., shot in the head, and killed instantly. Wounded, Captain I. H. Elliot, Company E, from Princeton, Ill., shot in the arm; Thomas Royce, Company E, from Lamoille, shot in the shoulder; W. Evans, Company E, from Polo, shot in the leg; David Kitchen, Company E. from Abington, shot in the hip; Prince G. Rigsley, Company E, from Abington, shot in the side and through the hip; Albert Kaufman, Company E, from Princeton, shot with buckshot in the head, breast, and arm; A. C. Miller, Company K, from Abington, shot through the arm, and escaped back to Pilot Knob.
Abington (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 92
, shot in the arm; Thomas Royce, Company E, from Lamoille, shot in the shoulder; W. Evans, Company E, from Polo, shot in the leg; David Kitchen, Company E. from Abington, shot in the hip; Prince G. Rigsley, Company E, from Abington, shot in the side and through the hip; Albert Kaufman, Company E, from Princeton, shot with buckshog; David Kitchen, Company E. from Abington, shot in the hip; Prince G. Rigsley, Company E, from Abington, shot in the side and through the hip; Albert Kaufman, Company E, from Princeton, shot with buckshot in the head, breast, and arm; A. C. Miller, Company K, from Abington, shot through the arm, and escaped back to Pilot Knob. g; David Kitchen, Company E. from Abington, shot in the hip; Prince G. Rigsley, Company E, from Abington, shot in the side and through the hip; Albert Kaufman, Company E, from Princeton, shot with buckshot in the head, breast, and arm; A. C. Miller, Company K, from Abington, shot through the arm, and escaped back to Pilot Knob.
Galesburg (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 92
t on the enemy. Jeff. Thompson himself admitted twenty killed. In the rebel force was a gang of Indians, or persons disguised as such, who, during the fight, kept up a great shouting. The sick and wounded of Captain Elliot's company were brought up to the city with him, and have a short leave of absence. The remainder of his company, fifty-two in number, are at Victoria. The following is the list of killed and wounded:--Killed, George G. Foster, Orderly Sergeant of Company E, from Galesburg, Ill., shot in the head, and killed instantly. Wounded, Captain I. H. Elliot, Company E, from Princeton, Ill., shot in the arm; Thomas Royce, Company E, from Lamoille, shot in the shoulder; W. Evans, Company E, from Polo, shot in the leg; David Kitchen, Company E. from Abington, shot in the hip; Prince G. Rigsley, Company E, from Abington, shot in the side and through the hip; Albert Kaufman, Company E, from Princeton, shot with buckshot in the head, breast, and arm; A. C. Miller, Company K
Polo, Ogle County, Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 92
rebel force was a gang of Indians, or persons disguised as such, who, during the fight, kept up a great shouting. The sick and wounded of Captain Elliot's company were brought up to the city with him, and have a short leave of absence. The remainder of his company, fifty-two in number, are at Victoria. The following is the list of killed and wounded:--Killed, George G. Foster, Orderly Sergeant of Company E, from Galesburg, Ill., shot in the head, and killed instantly. Wounded, Captain I. H. Elliot, Company E, from Princeton, Ill., shot in the arm; Thomas Royce, Company E, from Lamoille, shot in the shoulder; W. Evans, Company E, from Polo, shot in the leg; David Kitchen, Company E. from Abington, shot in the hip; Prince G. Rigsley, Company E, from Abington, shot in the side and through the hip; Albert Kaufman, Company E, from Princeton, shot with buckshot in the head, breast, and arm; A. C. Miller, Company K, from Abington, shot through the arm, and escaped back to Pilot Knob.
Princeton, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 92
ebel force was a gang of Indians, or persons disguised as such, who, during the fight, kept up a great shouting. The sick and wounded of Captain Elliot's company were brought up to the city with him, and have a short leave of absence. The remainder of his company, fifty-two in number, are at Victoria. The following is the list of killed and wounded:--Killed, George G. Foster, Orderly Sergeant of Company E, from Galesburg, Ill., shot in the head, and killed instantly. Wounded, Captain I. H. Elliot, Company E, from Princeton, Ill., shot in the arm; Thomas Royce, Company E, from Lamoille, shot in the shoulder; W. Evans, Company E, from Polo, shot in the leg; David Kitchen, Company E. from Abington, shot in the hip; Prince G. Rigsley, Company E, from Abington, shot in the side and through the hip; Albert Kaufman, Company E, from Princeton, shot with buckshot in the head, breast, and arm; A. C. Miller, Company K, from Abington, shot through the arm, and escaped back to Pilot Knob.
Hughes (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 92
ttered up and. down the road for a distance of fifteen miles. He says the men fought bravely and inflicted the severest punishment on the enemy. Jeff. Thompson himself admitted twenty killed. In the rebel force was a gang of Indians, or persons disguised as such, who, during the fight, kept up a great shouting. The sick and wounded of Captain Elliot's company were brought up to the city with him, and have a short leave of absence. The remainder of his company, fifty-two in number, are at Victoria. The following is the list of killed and wounded:--Killed, George G. Foster, Orderly Sergeant of Company E, from Galesburg, Ill., shot in the head, and killed instantly. Wounded, Captain I. H. Elliot, Company E, from Princeton, Ill., shot in the arm; Thomas Royce, Company E, from Lamoille, shot in the shoulder; W. Evans, Company E, from Polo, shot in the leg; David Kitchen, Company E. from Abington, shot in the hip; Prince G. Rigsley, Company E, from Abington, shot in the side and thro
Potosi, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 92
ridge, and the condition of affairs at Pilot Knob and along the railroad. Mr. Kling left Pilot Knob on Tuesday morning, on the regular train, at nine o'clock, the regular time of departure. On reaching Mineral Point, a station a few miles above Potosi, they got news of the attack upon the guard at the Big River bridge, and the burning of the bridge by a large force of rebels under Jeff. Thompson. The news was brought to Mineral Point station by a number of wounded soldiers belonging to the fog there too late, were driven back by the rebels. Mr. Kling states that as soon as the train arrived at Mineral Point, the major in command there, belonging either to the Thirty-third or Thirty-eighth Illinois regiment, ordered the train back to Potosi, three miles off, for reinforcements. In a short time the reinforcements, consisting of three companies, came along on the train, and were about to push on up the road, when a council of war was called and it was decided to go down to Pilot Knob
Mineral Point (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 92
morning, on the regular train, at nine o'clock, the regular time of departure. On reaching Mineral Point, a station a few miles above Potosi, they got news of the attack upon the guard at the Big Rlate, were driven back by the rebels. Mr. Kling states that as soon as the train arrived at Mineral Point, the major in command there, belonging either to the Thirty-third or Thirty-eighth Illinois rlin, in command at the Knob, who, instead of forwarding troops, despatched the cars back to Mineral Point, with orders for the whole force there to report at once to him, as he was seriously threatened from the direction of Farmington. The train before going down ran up the road from Mineral Point to Blackwell's station, just at the bridge, in order to pick up the wounded and secure such baggaKling left, that they were but six miles off. Mr. Kling states that all of the bridges, from Mineral Point to De Soto, were deserted, the troops having been called on to Pilot Knob, and that it is in
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