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St. Louis (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 94
The acts of individual gallantry are so numerous in the whole command that it would be impossible to give to each an appropriate mention; but I do not hesitate to say that every corps behaved with the coolness and courage of veteran troops. It affords me pleasure to mention that Hon. Daniel McCook, (father of Gen. McCook,) as an amateur soldier, gun in hand, volunteered and rendered much service during the engagement. I also mention like services rendered by Benjamin G. Owen, Esq., of St. Louis. Both of these gentlemen were greatly exposed during the action. I am informed by authority deemed reliable, that the enemy's forces consisted of the following troops, viz. :--the Thirteenth and Nineteenth Mississippi regiments; the Eighth Virginia regiment of Infantry; Colonel Ashby's regiment of Cavalry; and Rogers' Richmond battery of six pieces and one thirty-two-pounder columbiad, commanded by Gen. Evans in person. Bolivar Heights was taken at half-past 1 P. M. I directed our t
Berlin, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 94
fferent effects produced by the James and Hotchkiss shell before I close. The Hotchkiss was used entirely during that part of the action before the enemy finally retreated. The James was that used in shelling Loudon Heights. The former did not fail in producing the effect desired but once, and that was caused by a failure to explode, and not by any separation of the leaden band from the projectile. The latter, (the James,) however, in this as well as other actions — at Pritchard's Mills, Berlin, and Point of Rocks, at which I have used them, and the results of which I have reported to you heretofore — worked very badly. Of the five shells that I threw at the enemy on Loudon, two failed to explode; and, as an instance of what great deviation is caused by the lead flying off from the shell, which is always the case with this projectile, I need only remark that, with the same elevation, one shell struck half way up the mountain, the other clean over it. The leaden band would sometime
Enfield (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 94
as chased by a mounted officer while he was assisting one of the wounded Wisconsin boys off. He turned and shot his pursuer through the breast. The officer proved to be Colonel Ashby, the commander of the rebels, which accounted for the lull in the battle alluded to. We have since learned that he was not killed, but will probably have to keep in the house for some time. There were many other similar scenes. We have heard there were one hundred and fifty of them killed and wounded. The Enfield rifle is the piece that tells. I heard one of the rebels exclaim: I wish to God we had their guns! We found the men they had killed in their charge upon the Wisconsin Company A, stripped and stabbed through and through with bayonets. That is the way they desecrate the dead. So much for the chivalrous Virginians! We vowed vengeance if we ever met with them again. We camped upon the field, lying down just as we were, and it needed no rocking to put us to sleep. At midnight we were ar
Wisconsin (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 94
pkins' battery, which was upon the Maryland Heights east of the ferry. Two Wisconsin companies, led by Captain Henry Bertram, made a desperate charge upon the enend left, considerably in advance of the piece, and deployed obliquely. The Wisconsin men, commanded by Captain H. Bertram, were on the left; the Massachusetts men from the woods, and we were forced to fall back to our former position. The Wisconsin company was considerably cut up, but we escaped, with the single exception ofall was chased by a mounted officer while he was assisting one of the wounded Wisconsin boys off. He turned and shot his pursuer through the breast. The officer pro are the only two hurt, and the doctor says they are not very seriously. The Wisconsin boys suffered most. They had six killed, ten wounded, and one is missing. C) this morning. Now I assure you this is the truth of the whole matter. The Wisconsin boys complain of the Massachusetts men for running first, who themselves are
Maryland Heights (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 94
ghts, also opened with shell. This was immediately replied to, and subsequently silenced, by a section of the Rhode Island First battery, which, on Monday morning, 14th inst., had been withdrawn from its position at Bolivar and stationed on Maryland Heights. At half-past 9 A. M. an order from Col. Geary arrived to take my piece immediately over the river and report to him. Previous to doing so, by order of Major Gould, of the Thirteenth Massachusetts Volunteers, I had telegraphed to Point of Renty-four pounder which we took. It is no wonder we had to fight, and the greatest wonder is how we held our own. They also had artillery on Loudon Mountain, which kept pouring in shot and shell upon us, and at one time our own artillery on Maryland Heights shelled us, as we were falling back, thinking we were the enemy. There were many side scenes. Stimpson had a hand-to-hand fight with one of the cavalry, whom he bayoneted, illustrating the bayonet drill in which the company has been exer
Charles Town (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 94
nfantry and artillery soon took position upon the heights from which my pickets had been driven. Their three pieces of artillery were stationed on and near the Charlestown road, where it crosses Bolivar Heights. They had one thirty-two-pounder columbiad, one steel rifled thirteen-pounder, and one brass six-pounder, all of which wion of Hallstown. If any cavalry had been attached to my command the enemy could have been cut to pieces, as they did not cease their flight until they reached Charlestown, a distance of six miles. Immediately after the capture of the heights, Major Tyndale arrived with a reinforcement of five companies of my regiment from Poind cavalry regiment of Colonel Ashby. The rebels had six pieces of artillery-four of them upon Loudon Heights south, and two upon Bolivar Heights west, upon the Charlestown road, midway between the Potomac and the Shenandoah Rivers, and a mile and a half back of the ferry. The rebels first drove in our pickets from Bolivar Heights
Bolivar, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 94
th, my pickets stationed on the heights above Bolivar, extending from the Potomac to the Shenandoah Harper's Ferry, were driven into the town of Bolivar by the enemy, who approached from the west in and rallied my pickets upon the main body in Bolivar. In a short time the action became generalent which occurred at Harper's Ferry and Bolivar, Virginia, on Wednesday, 16th instant: On Sundanst., had been withdrawn from its position at Bolivar and stationed on Maryland Heights. At half-por several hours. Their cavalry charged into Bolivar, but were driven back by the Third Wisconsin l shout for the Union, stormed the heights of Bolivar, drove the enemy in the wildest confusion fro A few of their cavalry also appeared back of Bolivar, but were promptly shelled and dispersed by t forward to the centre, which was the town of Bolivar. We moved up the turnpike, meeting one of th bushels of wheat that was in a mill there at Bolivar. On the top of the hill nine men had an ol
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 94
giment of Cavalry; and Rogers' Richmond battery of six pieces and one thirty-two-pounder columbiad, commanded by Gen. Evans in person. Bolivar Heights was taken at half-past 1 P. M. I directed our troops to rest there until evening, when we fired a farewell shot into Hallstown, and as there was no longer any necessity to remain on that side of the Potomac, our errand having been crowned with the fullest success, I marched my command to the ferry, and in five hours it was safely landed in Maryland. There being no immediate apprehension of the enemy there, I ordered the Wisconsin companies to report to Colonel Ruger, their commander, in Frederick, and returned to this place with part of my regiment and the two guns of the New York battery, leaving Captain Tompkins' guns with Major Gould for a few days; also one company from my own regiment. Yours, &c., John W. Geary, Colonel Commanding Twenty-eighth Regiment P. V. Lieutenant Martin's report. Headquarters Twenty-Eighth re
Cornfield Point (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 94
s of Companies A, D, F, and G, of the Twenty-eighth Pennsylvania; C, I, and K, Thirteenth Massachusetts; A, C, and H, Third Wisconsin, aided by two amateurs, (Judge Daniel McCook and Benjamin G. Owens of Illinois,) were attacked by twenty-five hundred or more of the rebels, including the celebrated cavalry regiment of Colonel Ashby. The rebels had six pieces of artillery-four of them upon Loudon Heights south, and two upon Bolivar Heights west, upon the Charlestown road, midway between the Potomac and the Shenandoah Rivers, and a mile and a half back of the ferry. The rebels first drove in our pickets from Bolivar Heights, and then began a cross fire upon us, which lasted for several hours. Their cavalry charged into Bolivar, but were driven back by the Third Wisconsin boys, aided by shells from Capt. Tompkins' battery, which was upon the Maryland Heights east of the ferry. Two Wisconsin companies, led by Captain Henry Bertram, made a desperate charge upon the enemy's guns and t
Frederick, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 94
fullest success, I marched my command to the ferry, and in five hours it was safely landed in Maryland. There being no immediate apprehension of the enemy there, I ordered the Wisconsin companies to report to Colonel Ruger, their commander, in Frederick, and returned to this place with part of my regiment and the two guns of the New York battery, leaving Captain Tompkins' guns with Major Gould for a few days; also one company from my own regiment. Yours, &c., John W. Geary, Colonel Commandok. The Virginians followed, but were unable, as the retreating enemy had a big start, to overtake them. Four of the Wisconsin men were killed, and eight or ten of the Massachusetts men wounded. The killed and wounded were brought here (to Frederick) this morning. Now I assure you this is the truth of the whole matter. The Wisconsin boys complain of the Massachusetts men for running first, who themselves are charged in turn with cowardice. Colonel Geary had command of the Federals, and
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