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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 146
South Carolina Thirty years ago. On the 4th of July, 1832, Independence day was celebrated at Charleston by two separate meetings: one the Unionists, the other the Nullifiers. Colonel Hayne, the Southern champion who was so discomfited in the tilt with Webster, spoke to the Nullification meeting, and Drayton, a distinguished Unionist member of Congress, father of Gen. Drayton who commanded at the Port Royal forts during the recent bombardment, to the Unionists. At the conclusion of Drayton's powerful and splendid oration, the following beautiful ode was chanted by a full choir: Hail, our country's natal morn! Hail, our spreading kindred born! Hail, thou banner, not yet torn! Waving o'er the free! While this day in festive throng, Millions swell the patriot's song, Shall we not the note prolong? Hallowed jubilee! Who would sever Freedom's shrine? Who would draw the invidious line? Though by birth one spot be mine, Dear is all the rest-- Dear to me the South's fair land; Dear the
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 146
South Carolina Thirty years ago. On the 4th of July, 1832, Independence day was celebrated at Charleston by two separate meetings: one the Unionists, the other the Nullifiers. Colonel Hayne, the Southern champion who was so discomfited in the tilt with Webster, spoke to the Nullification meeting, and Drayton, a distinguished Unionist member of Congress, father of Gen. Drayton who commanded at the Port Royal forts during the recent bombardment, to the Unionists. At the conclusion of Drayton's powerful and splendid oration, the following beautiful ode was chanted by a full choir: Hail, our country's natal morn! Hail, our spreading kindred born! Hail, thou banner, not yet torn! Waving o'er the free! While this day in festive throng, Millions swell the patriot's song, Shall we not the note prolong? Hallowed jubilee! Who would sever Freedom's shrine? Who would draw the invidious line? Though by birth one spot be mine, Dear is all the rest-- Dear to me the South's fair land; Dear the
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 146
ation, the following beautiful ode was chanted by a full choir: Hail, our country's natal morn! Hail, our spreading kindred born! Hail, thou banner, not yet torn! Waving o'er the free! While this day in festive throng, Millions swell the patriot's song, Shall we not the note prolong? Hallowed jubilee! Who would sever Freedom's shrine? Who would draw the invidious line? Though by birth one spot be mine, Dear is all the rest-- Dear to me the South's fair land; Dear the central mountain band, Dear New England's rocky strand, Dear the prairied West. By our altars pure and free, By our laws' deep-rooted tree, By the past's dread memory, By our Washington-- By our common kindred tongue! By our hopes-bright, buoyant, young, By the tie of country strong, We will still be one. Fathers! have ye bled in vain? Ages, must you droop again? Maker, shall we rashly stain, Blessings sent by Thee? No! receive our solemn vow, While before thy throne we bow, Ever to maintain as now, “Union--Liberty!
John A. Washington (search for this): chapter 146
ration, the following beautiful ode was chanted by a full choir: Hail, our country's natal morn! Hail, our spreading kindred born! Hail, thou banner, not yet torn! Waving o'er the free! While this day in festive throng, Millions swell the patriot's song, Shall we not the note prolong? Hallowed jubilee! Who would sever Freedom's shrine? Who would draw the invidious line? Though by birth one spot be mine, Dear is all the rest-- Dear to me the South's fair land; Dear the central mountain band, Dear New England's rocky strand, Dear the prairied West. By our altars pure and free, By our laws' deep-rooted tree, By the past's dread memory, By our Washington-- By our common kindred tongue! By our hopes-bright, buoyant, young, By the tie of country strong, We will still be one. Fathers! have ye bled in vain? Ages, must you droop again? Maker, shall we rashly stain, Blessings sent by Thee? No! receive our solemn vow, While before thy throne we bow, Ever to maintain as now, “Union--Liberty!
South Carolina Thirty years ago. On the 4th of July, 1832, Independence day was celebrated at Charleston by two separate meetings: one the Unionists, the other the Nullifiers. Colonel Hayne, the Southern champion who was so discomfited in the tilt with Webster, spoke to the Nullification meeting, and Drayton, a distinguished Unionist member of Congress, father of Gen. Drayton who commanded at the Port Royal forts during the recent bombardment, to the Unionists. At the conclusion of Drayton's powerful and splendid oration, the following beautiful ode was chanted by a full choir: Hail, our country's natal morn! Hail, our spreading kindred born! Hail, thou banner, not yet torn! Waving o'er the free! While this day in festive throng, Millions swell the patriot's song, Shall we not the note prolong? Hallowed jubilee! Who would sever Freedom's shrine? Who would draw the invidious line? Though by birth one spot be mine, Dear is all the rest-- Dear to me the South's fair land; Dear the
nionists, the other the Nullifiers. Colonel Hayne, the Southern champion who was so discomfited in the tilt with Webster, spoke to the Nullification meeting, and Drayton, a distinguished Unionist member of Congress, father of Gen. Drayton who commanded at the Port Royal forts during the recent bombardment, to the Unionists. At thGen. Drayton who commanded at the Port Royal forts during the recent bombardment, to the Unionists. At the conclusion of Drayton's powerful and splendid oration, the following beautiful ode was chanted by a full choir: Hail, our country's natal morn! Hail, our spreading kindred born! Hail, thou banner, not yet torn! Waving o'er the free! While this day in festive throng, Millions swell the patriot's song, Shall we not the note prolonDrayton's powerful and splendid oration, the following beautiful ode was chanted by a full choir: Hail, our country's natal morn! Hail, our spreading kindred born! Hail, thou banner, not yet torn! Waving o'er the free! While this day in festive throng, Millions swell the patriot's song, Shall we not the note prolong? Hallowed jubilee! Who would sever Freedom's shrine? Who would draw the invidious line? Though by birth one spot be mine, Dear is all the rest-- Dear to me the South's fair land; Dear the central mountain band, Dear New England's rocky strand, Dear the prairied West. By our altars pure and free, By our laws' deep-rooted tree, By
Nannie Webster (search for this): chapter 146
South Carolina Thirty years ago. On the 4th of July, 1832, Independence day was celebrated at Charleston by two separate meetings: one the Unionists, the other the Nullifiers. Colonel Hayne, the Southern champion who was so discomfited in the tilt with Webster, spoke to the Nullification meeting, and Drayton, a distinguished Unionist member of Congress, father of Gen. Drayton who commanded at the Port Royal forts during the recent bombardment, to the Unionists. At the conclusion of Drayton's powerful and splendid oration, the following beautiful ode was chanted by a full choir: Hail, our country's natal morn! Hail, our spreading kindred born! Hail, thou banner, not yet torn! Waving o'er the free! While this day in festive throng, Millions swell the patriot's song, Shall we not the note prolong? Hallowed jubilee! Who would sever Freedom's shrine? Who would draw the invidious line? Though by birth one spot be mine, Dear is all the rest-- Dear to me the South's fair land; Dear the
July 4th, 1832 AD (search for this): chapter 146
South Carolina Thirty years ago. On the 4th of July, 1832, Independence day was celebrated at Charleston by two separate meetings: one the Unionists, the other the Nullifiers. Colonel Hayne, the Southern champion who was so discomfited in the tilt with Webster, spoke to the Nullification meeting, and Drayton, a distinguished Unionist member of Congress, father of Gen. Drayton who commanded at the Port Royal forts during the recent bombardment, to the Unionists. At the conclusion of Drayton's powerful and splendid oration, the following beautiful ode was chanted by a full choir: Hail, our country's natal morn! Hail, our spreading kindred born! Hail, thou banner, not yet torn! Waving o'er the free! While this day in festive throng, Millions swell the patriot's song, Shall we not the note prolong? Hallowed jubilee! Who would sever Freedom's shrine? Who would draw the invidious line? Though by birth one spot be mine, Dear is all the rest-- Dear to me the South's fair land; Dear the