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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 178
Southern Confederacy but once; but the circumstances were such as to distinctly impress the man's character, as revealed by that authentic medium, natural language, upon my mind. A few days before the inauguration of General Taylor, a lady of Washington who had been a schoolmate of his daughter, invited us to accompany her on a visit of welcome to her old friend. The greeting between them was most cordial; and being introduced to the family of the President elect under such auspices, having nn this land of transition and of contrasts, to hear the simple-hearted old general talk of his impressions, feelings, and purposes, amid the intrigues of office-hunters, and the ostentation of fashionable and the excitement of political life at Washington on the eve of his inauguration. Not a man of that eager and restless throng seemed more unconscious and unpretending than the one about to be installed as the head of the nation. There was an almost ludicrous contrast between the homely costu
Prairie Du Chien (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 178
h auspices, having no political object to gain by the acquaintance, we soon became on terms of familiar intercourse with the good old man, and improved opportunities to converse with him, not so much because of his antecedents and actual position, nor on account of any special interest which he himself inspired upon a superficial observation, but because a friend with whom I had been in the habit of discussing character had often entertained me with an account of a delightful sojourn at Prairie du Chien in midwinter, when, during a Western tour, he was the guest of General Taylor, whose conscientious and modest as well as patient and intrepid character he had learned to regard with the highest respect and affection. It was one of those anomalous social experiences nowhere realized except in this land of transition and of contrasts, to hear the simple-hearted old general talk of his impressions, feelings, and purposes, amid the intrigues of office-hunters, and the ostentation of fash
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 178
ired soldier, whose eyes were cast down, and whose hands were listlessly folded — to challenge, as it were, with his fluent self-confidence the uneloquent but intrepid man of action, and make him feel how alien to his habits and capacity was the arena to which popular enthusiasm had lifted him. In a word, Jefferson Davis then and there appeared like the incarnation of rhetorical impudence; the style of the man was presumptuous and aggressive, and no delicacy of perception or fine instinct of humanity tempered his arrogant ambition; while the modest, patient, faithful old hero made the inference and the impression more vivid and repulsive; and the recent and recreant career of Jefferson Davis — the bombastic mendacity, as well as the impudent and vulgar tone of his public communications — make this little episode foreshadow that impersonation of reckless audacity which confronts, with brazen aggressiveness, the free people of the United States.--Y., in the Boston Transcript, Oct.
J. M. Taylor (search for this): chapter 178
ium, natural language, upon my mind. A few days before the inauguration of General Taylor, a lady of Washington who had been a schoolmate of his daughter, invited usrie du Chien in midwinter, when, during a Western tour, he was the guest of General Taylor, whose conscientious and modest as well as patient and intrepid character h was made chairman of this committee,--his previous domestic relations with General Taylor suggesting him as an acceptable medium ; though, had the public been as welhe result of the ballot, and state the same to the successful candidate. General Taylor's want of oratorical accomplishments, his aversion to display, his modest dration. Instead thereof, Jefferson Davis, entering the hotel parlor, where General Taylor was seated, with the aspect of a kindly, honest old farmer, paused about eie former relations of the parties, (Davis having by a runaway match married General Taylor's daughter, who died a few months after,) and the utter novelty of the good
ired soldier, whose eyes were cast down, and whose hands were listlessly folded — to challenge, as it were, with his fluent self-confidence the uneloquent but intrepid man of action, and make him feel how alien to his habits and capacity was the arena to which popular enthusiasm had lifted him. In a word, Jefferson Davis then and there appeared like the incarnation of rhetorical impudence; the style of the man was presumptuous and aggressive, and no delicacy of perception or fine instinct of humanity tempered his arrogant ambition; while the modest, patient, faithful old hero made the inference and the impression more vivid and repulsive; and the recent and recreant career of Jefferson Davis — the bombastic mendacity, as well as the impudent and vulgar tone of his public communications — make this little episode foreshadow that impersonation of reckless audacity which confronts, with brazen aggressiveness, the free people of the United States.--Y., in the Boston Transcript, Oct.
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 178
A Reminiscence of Jeff. Davis.--I never saw the so-called President of the so-called Southern Confederacy but once; but the circumstances were such as to distincpeople as Chief Magistrate. It was doubtless with a courteous intent that Jefferson Davis was made chairman of this committee,--his previous domestic relations withrmance only quiet courtesy and respectful consideration. Instead thereof, Jefferson Davis, entering the hotel parlor, where General Taylor was seated, with the aspener at the bar. The difference of age and the former relations of the parties, (Davis having by a runaway match married General Taylor's daughter, who died a few monacity was the arena to which popular enthusiasm had lifted him. In a word, Jefferson Davis then and there appeared like the incarnation of rhetorical impudence; the impression more vivid and repulsive; and the recent and recreant career of Jefferson Davis — the bombastic mendacity, as well as the impudent and vulgar tone of his
Washington on the eve of his inauguration. Not a man of that eager and restless throng seemed more unconscious and unpretending than the one about to be installed as the head of the nation. There was an almost ludicrous contrast between the homely costume and manners, the simple tastes and habits, and the frank and modest conversation of the central figure, and the reserve or pretension of those surrounding him. He seemed literally dragged along in the procession of political aspirants, as Lamb complained was his fate in the march of the new world. More like a martyr than a victor, he bore his faculties so meekly, that it seemed as cruel to the man to wrest him from his native sphere, as inappropriate and undesirable for the country to place in the Presidential chair one whose aptitudes were almost exclusively for the post of a frontier soldier or thrifty agriculturist. It needed no prescient insight to anticipate that he would become the tool of designing politicians, or the vict